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Dashboards

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
Dashboards
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 28, 2003 10:04 PM
Looking at some of the pics posted on this board, I can't believe how well the dash boards are detailed. How the heck do you do that?


  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 28, 2003 11:27 PM
real little men get in side and do the work for us. No not realy just takes time and some good eye sight. One i dont have the time nor the eye sight so i skip all the fine little detail like that just make it a dark color and they will never see it..:)
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: West of Chicago
Posted by garyo on Monday, December 29, 2003 7:05 AM
I usually just "wash" the gauges in a lighter color than the interior color (or dashboard color) then use a "Sharpie" to get the detail. Never been able to use a brush.
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Right Here
Posted by vinnietbird on Monday, December 29, 2003 8:49 AM
On round gauges,I always drill them out,detail the dash with whatever colors I'm going to use ,Bare Metal Foil,etc.,then,I put gauge decals in there respective locations from behind.I just carefully glue the decal in with the paper back,no water involved.And if there is good glove compertment lines ( I always scribe mine to make the lines crisp),I run a little blackwash through the lines .I'll sometimes dillute the black paint ,or use a dark shade of grey so it doesn't look like black stripes on my dash.Flats and semi-flats for contrast.I dont use glosses on my dash boards.Oh,I forgot to tell you,After the decals are glued in and dry,you can add a little drop of clear glue to the front of the decal to give it the appearance of gauge lenses.GOOD LUCK.
"The HEMI turns on where everything else turns off"
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 12:01 PM
I usually just work carefully, trying to utilize existing engraving or getting creative. Here's a dash I did for my '63 Galaxie custom. I took a photo of the speedo from the internet and reduced it in photoshop and them printed it off on photo paper on my printer. Then cut it out, glued in place and put a few drops of clear enamel over it. the small gauges on either side of the speedo are detail master gauges. I brush painted the silver insert, used a photo etch heater control and radio, and the clock is the same process as the speedo. Then I used The Detailer blackwash over the silver insert to give it depth.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 12:53 PM
thats nice Ron realy nice work. You want to do a dash for me i will send you the money and dash to cover every thing you do there.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 2:42 PM
For a while there I thought maybe there was a super secret store you got such great looking dashes at...but it seems like out right painting of the dash boards is not the way to do it. Even with the ideas posted here, there are still probably a hundred other was to detail a dash!

Thanks.




  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: West of Chicago
Posted by garyo on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 3:25 PM
Last night I surfed some automotive sites for dashboard guages. Downloaded the JPEG artwork.
* Put into a photo editor (Paintshop Pro, but any will do). Reduced them down to the size to fit in the dashboard
* Printed them out on my photo printer.
* Cut them out with #11 and just stuck them in with a little glue backing.

The while numbers on black background is still pretty hard to see, but black numbers on white works real well.

Beat the heck out of painting.
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 5:37 PM
Neat idea for the gauge faces. Maybe these darn computers have a use after all.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

Trevor

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 03, 2004 9:44 AM
I use a very fine Testors detail brush for painting in buttons, knobs and switches. You just have to take your time. Also, look online for pictures of the interior of the car you are modeling. Getting little, easily overlooked details right can really make the dash look good.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:01 PM
You can find some great photos of dash clusters on e-Bay in the used auto parts section.
WF
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:12 PM
If you are using a photo program and find that the guage images are fuzzy, try this: Load the gauge photo into the program, now resize the photo ( make it as large as you like). Use the photoshop tools to clean up the images or simply black out most of the gauge and use the text tool to make new crisp digits. You can create your own gauge designs as well. Any color combination, even neon needles. You will be amazed at how clean , crisp, and legible your gauges appear when you now reduce the size to scale and print on photo paper.
I did this last night with a '68 Plymouth cluster, then I removed the plastic from the dash and installed a piece of clear acetate with the new photo reduced cluster. I amazed myself, it really looks good.
WF
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 03, 2004 11:49 PM
Walter,

Can you post a pic of it? I'd like to see it.


  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: West of Chicago
Posted by garyo on Sunday, January 04, 2004 10:22 AM
Have to try your retouching trick in a photo editor. I just resized the orginal image and printed, but the white on black gauges were not real sharp. Your Idea should make it better. Thanks
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 04, 2004 11:55 AM
I hope this works. Go to my fotki album: http://images5.fotki.com/v52/free/d2d0c/1/162316/582864/Dashtutorial-or.jpg and check out the info I just posted there. When on the page, click on "see version of original uploaded photo" ( or something like that) at the bottom).. My before and after photos would have been better if I printed on photo paper before I scanned the article.
WF
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 04, 2004 11:57 AM
Here, try this link instead.http://public.fotki.com/announcerguy/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 04, 2004 6:37 PM


Hey Walter,

I inserted the link from your great tutorial on the dashboard detailing. Hope this was okay?


  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 10:30 PM
hey paul, one little neat trick i like to do , is to take a tooth-pick, dip it in orange paint and paint the gauge needles with it. it brings out a lot of detail, and is very visable from outside the modelThumbs UpThumbs Up

Dave http://public.fotki.com/FIREMODELMAN/

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 11:24 PM
i think a maganfing glass with the light might be a good investment too!!!
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Foothills of Colorado
Posted by Hoser on Thursday, January 08, 2004 11:22 AM
For kit guages, I've had good luck using artists pencils (silver, white, red and orange). I've found it's a bit more forgiving than dry-brushing, just keep the point sharp. Use 5-minute epoxy for the lenses - clear acrylic makes the colors run.
"Trust no one; even those people you know and trust." - Jack S. Margolis
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 08, 2004 5:26 PM
Yes. I am trying all of the ideas.


  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 16, 2004 5:26 PM
How can we I make the carpet effect in the interior?
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 16, 2004 8:38 PM
Flocking. There are several posts on how to do it some where here.


  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Tuesday, January 20, 2004 11:14 PM
Garyo's method works really well. And, after you place the photo instruments in the opening, put a drop or two of clearcoat over it to make a glossy, glass-like appearance (if you don't have a clear plastic lens for the guage(s).

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 21, 2004 11:41 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by mishalah

Garyo's method works really well. And, after you place the photo instruments in the opening, put a drop or two of clearcoat over it to make a glossy, glass-like appearance (if you don't have a clear plastic lens for the guage(s).


Yeah, that works great! I use Future, but the same results can be had from other products. It really does look like a glass lens!
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Illinois
Posted by hot ford coupe on Saturday, January 24, 2004 10:14 AM
One thing I used to do on my aircraft guage panels was to take the original panel, drill out the guage faces to the bezel( make sure you have a good picture of your dash or panel so you can easily reproduce which guage goes where) then thin the guage area to about .010 or less. I then glue a very thin piece of clear plastic behind the outer thinned out panel. The photo reduced guages can then be attached to the clear plastice frome behind. You then have what looks like glass over your guage faces. Looks a lot more realistic than clear paine over the guages. Also, you need high power magnification and strong light for the other detail. I use the magnifiers I bought for my dental practice, in 3.5, 5.5 and 8 power. I can really see up close with those. Hope this helps.
Hot Ford CoupeWink
I'm hopelessly addicted to building models. Not finishing them, just building them.
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Trondheim, Norway
Posted by Slabbedask on Saturday, January 24, 2004 4:03 PM
Model Car Garage makes a lot of nice photoreduced instrument faces. Either with or without bezels. I use their Moon instrument faces in almost all of my Hot Rods and they look great. On other models I just airbrush the instruments with matt black(or another backing colour) and paint the details using the dry-brushing technique. A drop of five minute epoxy makes a convincing glass, and gives a bit of depth to it as well.
You're never too old to have a happy childhood...! http://public.fotki.com/slabbedask/

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