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Black leather interior, what paint should I use?

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
Black leather interior, what paint should I use?
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 09, 2004 8:25 PM
Hi, I just recently got back into building model cars. It has been about 8 years since I built my last one. Anyway, I chose a "98 Saleen Mustang to do first. My problem is, the car is supposed to have black leather interior. The instructions say to use Satin black paint to paint the seats. I can't find Satin black paint anywhere. Does anyone know what paint I should use to make them look the most like real leather seats?

I would think Gloss black would make them too shiny. Any help would be much appreciated.

Mike
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: north georgia
Posted by roadhawg on Sunday, May 09, 2004 8:46 PM
use the model master "black chrome trim". its a satin black that looks a lot like black leather.

I went to a "gentleman's club" because the sign said they had all the hottest models. I thought it was a hobby shop. Man, was I ever disappointed.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 09, 2004 8:52 PM
Hey Mike,
I had come across a picture of some very nice seats made by Stoppco. I wrote him because I was so Impressed and he wrote me back telling me how to do it. So I'll be glad to share it with you. The seats looked so soft and real, like a soft leather only his was more flat. So you might want to had some gloss highlights at the end. But first he said to mix some talc powder with what ever paint you want to use ( Stoppco used a flat black and thats why I said you might want to had some highlights at the end or just use gloss black with the powder)
Then brush the mixture on. I don't have an exact ratio, but I'll try to pull up the photo for you or If you see his name on the forum. Click the email Icon and you'd be able to ask him youself. So let me know what you think and I'll try to get the picture and the ratio. Wink
Cheers!!!!!! SmileBig SmileCool
Kelley Eight BallKisses
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Sunday, May 09, 2004 8:54 PM
Here is an odd suggestion that I found to work very well.
Paint it flat black, then when it's completely dry, rub your fingers on your forehead or nose and rub that skin oil into the flat paint. No kidding!
Do not overcoat after this and you should get a good result. Please remember to practice this technique on a spare part first!

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 09, 2004 9:32 PM
Thanks for all your suggestions. I will let you know how they turn out.

BTW, lilBear, I would love to see the picture you are talking about.

Thanks again,

Mike
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Illinois
Posted by hot ford coupe on Sunday, May 09, 2004 9:56 PM
I tried to use talc with black paint and it was terrible with a capital yucchh. All it did was make a mess. The finish was flat but also very chalky. I would stick with the flat black, nose oil trick.( I used to do that in the early days) and you should be o.k.. Even better, if you know how to skiv leather, you can actually upholster the car with real leather. You can find the technique on Brian's model car site www.briansmodelcars.com in the tutuorial section by Alex Kustov. It takes a bit of practice but it works. I'm doing it now for my big deuce build but you can do it for 1/25 scale as the tutorial will show.
I'm hopelessly addicted to building models. Not finishing them, just building them.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 10, 2004 1:50 PM
If you don't have enough "natural oil" on your nose try some spray furniture polish and apply with a soft cloth over flat black. It works just as well.
WF
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 10, 2004 3:32 PM
Hey Mike,
I got that photo for you. Now you have to go to this link:
http://community.webshots.com/album/130931793mxhAUc?787
This is all Stoppco stuff but that link takes you to his "my models" folder go to
the second page of that folder and it is picture # 010. Okay That's that!! Smile
Actually it looks more like vinyl than leather but it's something to work with!! I hope you like them as much and I do though. I had to email him to ask how he did them when I saw them. But you'll have to play around with the ratio!!
Cheers!!!! Cool
Kelley Eight BallKisses
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 10, 2004 8:00 PM

another tip mike is use ordinary flat black let it dry thouroughly then with a clean dry finger tip rub it the natural oil from a finger tip will give just the right amount of gloss for a pretty good simulation of leather upholstery...

old modlers trick seldom seen any more

Walt
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 12:42 AM
I've done a couple interiors using Mazda Sparkling Black MAZ 83-88. It's not as glossy as black-and I was quite impressed with the results. I picked a small touch up rattle can at the auto parts store. Try it on an old seat.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 6:26 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by MikeTSI

Hi, I just recently got back into building model cars. It has been about 8 years since I built my last one. Anyway, I chose a "98 Saleen Mustang to do first. My problem is, the car is supposed to have black leather interior. The instructions say to use Satin black paint to paint the seats. I can't find Satin black paint anywhere. Does anyone know what paint I should use to make them look the most like real leather seats?

I would think Gloss black would make them too shiny. Any help would be much appreciated.

Mike

Mike,

Another name for "Satin Black" is "Semi-Gloss Black". ModelMaster Acryl (Testors water-borne enamel line) has a semi-gloss black that is excellent for interiors. However, you can make your own semi-gloss black from the regular Modelmaster or Testors enamel paint lines by simply mixing some gloss black with flat black. I've done that, and it works pretty well, although I prefer Acryl for interiors.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 13, 2004 2:32 PM
I took roadhawg's suggestion and I used the Black Chrome Trim from model masters and it looks pretty good. Thanks everyone for your suggestions.

mike
  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: cen. Cal. coast
Posted by lacquerjack on Friday, May 14, 2004 7:07 AM
I've had great results with the black chrome trim paint as well, and also fairly good results with the rubbed flat black although it's hard to get into the corners with your fingertips. On a vette I've been messing with for a while, I wanted several shades and textures of black so used gloss black Testors enamel with a coat of semi-gloss clear over it on the seats. It's a bit more shiny than the trim black, sort of like a thick layer of Armoral (yuck), but it looks pretty good with the other blacks inside the car and the Plasticoat black lacquer exterior. Try several of the suggested ways that have been mentioned on some strips of flat plastic and see which ones look the best to you. Good luck with your project.Big Smile
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 16, 2004 5:57 PM
I mix Apple Barrel gloss and flat together. Don't have a set ratio, just mix them to get the effect you like and it cleans up with water.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 22, 2004 8:34 AM
there's a texture paint from Premiere Hobby Products that is applyed wiyh a airbrush called Premiere upholstery Paint there's tons of colors and the finishs are fantastic there on ebay stores or email them at wcar76009@aol.com
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 23, 2004 7:45 PM
Hey Alfaman,
I hope you see this brother because you don't have an email address? Sad You can change that though if you want throug the "update profile" button!!! Cool
AnyWay. I don't really want to email the company until I see the products. I hope you have a link for some of the paints and what their textures look like. I know Me and a bunch of the builder here would surely like to check them out. I really appreciate the suggestion. So far, It sounds like a great one!!!! Thumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up
Cheers!!!!! SmileBig SmileCool
Kelley Eight BallKisses
P.S. I tried to do a search and it brought me to ebay. After that though I was lost.
So thats why I was asking. I tried but I need help!!!! Please Help Me?!! Smile,Wink, & Grin
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Canada
Posted by broncobuster on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 4:25 AM
I just mix a 50/50 mix of flat black and gloss black together, looks awesome, gives more of a vinyl affect, but use the greasy skin trick and presto LEATHER!!!!

[View:http://photobucket.com/derek_014]Keep the shiney side up.                                                                                                  Click the link to view my models.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Milwaukee
Posted by JakeCouture on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:53 AM
Has anybody else heard of this upholstery paint? Is it similar to faux fabric?
In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups. There are the police who investigate crimes, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories. Doink Doink! Jake Couture
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:58 AM
Krylon has a satin /semi-gloss rattlecan

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 11:09 AM
i use a tiny bit of spray furniture polish on a cloth to buff up the highpoints on plastic seats. it seems to work. I don't realy build modern cars, but there's a definite sheen to real modern car's leather which is very different in texture to old cars leather.
enjoy
Will
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 15, 2005 2:12 PM
Tamiya has a nice Semi-gloss I think would work for this, Mike.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 21, 2005 3:24 PM
i use gloss black then flat coat it. looks so real.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Tuesday, March 22, 2005 5:38 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by roadhawg

use the model master "black chrome trim". its a satin black that looks a lot like black leather.


Cool i have some of this but never use it, now i know what it's good for! Thanks Roadhawg.
  • Member since
    October, 2004
Posted by TJHammer on Thursday, September 08, 2005 4:13 PM
ive been playing around with "pleather" that i picked up at the upholstery store. It works well, but I cannot get the same impressions and ridges that help seats stand out. I may try leather with the tutorial guidelines, i was able to skiv the "pleather" so i guess i should be able to do the same with the real leather and follow that tutorial on making uniform indentations in the leather. Thing is, I AM TRYING TO SAVE $$ here, so the oily finger detail might be my plan, cause i just dont think real leather can achieve the detailed look as the cast molded seats in the kits...and besides, ive been waiting for my oily skin to come in handy once and for all!
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 08, 2005 9:22 PM
Use semi gloss black. I paint it overall semi gloss and then dry brush with gloss and run a little flat over it as well. One thing I haven't tried and I wonder if it might work is Testors leather paint.
  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: LIVE from Downtown Nowhere!!
Posted by lizardlust on Thursday, September 08, 2005 10:58 PM
One trick I remember reading from one of Juha Airo's works of art was to mix in just a "bit" of flat aluminum into semigloss black, then airbrush or handbrush the mixture onto the upholstered areas. You're gonna have to play with the mixture until you get the right "look", but it does add a bit of dimension and depth to the dreaded "dark cave" effect that one often gets with black interiors - flocking or felt on carpeted areas adds a nice contrast as well. NOW if I could only do exterior paint and foil like he does....
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 10, 2005 4:00 PM
I used the method with the skin oil here. In my opinion the results are marginal. What do you think?
  • Member since
    October, 2004
Posted by TJHammer on Sunday, September 11, 2005 10:39 AM
i played with all kinds of oil here in my home, with a test strip i used Pam cooking spray on a Q-Tip, olive oil, etc, furniture polish, truth is, they all work because of the oil effect . I liked something othe rthan my finger so i could regulate the oil amount. I found a double sided Q-Tip at my local Beauty Supply store with a rounded tip on one end and a pointed tip on the other, works wonders for the hard to reach areas.
Look for my final pics of my GSX in another thread. Theyll be posted soon, (mind you, its only my second model)
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 22, 2005 2:17 PM
Hi, I was advised to use the flat black paint and then polish with skin oils. Thinking about that approach I decided to try a variation, which has worked out quite well. I paint with flat paint of whatever colour leather I'm simulating, then sort of semi "dry brush" the flat paint with diluted/thinned Future Floor finish. What I mean by this is to not load up with the diluted Future; you want to put on a light coat and observe how it dries.

The dilution should leave just enough Future so that there is a slight sheen. The beauty of this is that you can vary the amount of sheen, to show show some variations in the reflections of the leather. Real leather does not have a consistent shine, but changes depending on the angle of view. I would recommend starting off with a heavily diluted mix, say 75/25 water to Future, and then build it up if more is needed. I haven't tried using alcohol instead of water to thin the Future, but it might work better as water tends to have some surface tension. If you overdo it, or don't like the result, you can always strip the Future using Windex or alcohol without affecting the flat paint too much (if it was enamel or Tamiya paint that's been allowed to cure completely).

Future is very cheap, and this method hardly uses any Future at all. Beats wearing out your thumb/finger from rubbing a skinny piece of ridged plastic, and you can apply it wherever it's needed, whereas it's hard to get your fingers into the small, scale crevices.

YMMV,
Darren
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 30, 2005 5:54 PM
Try the duplicolor bumper trim paint, and ad, your favorite persperation spot, presto, leather or vinal.Big Smile

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