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bare floor

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
bare floor
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 7:21 PM
ok, im in the middle of my trans am project, and im wondering how to get a bare non-carpeted floor look? the "carpet" is molded in thanks
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 11:27 PM
I would think you would have to sand the floor smooth and, based on photos or checking a real one somewhere, add strips of thin plastic strip stock to represent welds or overlapping floor panels. Then, paint it an appropriate color and weather as needed. Also, remember any wire looms that run along the floor to the rear lights or rear accesories. Hope this was helpfull and wish you good modeling!! WOLF
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, April 15, 2004 12:00 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by 67 Shelby

ok, im in the middle of my trans am project, and im wondering how to get a bare non-carpeted floor look? the "carpet" is molded in thanks


For starters, the floor of any car is exactly a mirror image of the floor pans as you see them from the bottom, so to be perfectly accurate, you might want to consider getting rid of any "interior tub", and work over the top of the chassis' floor pan to get the realism you'd probably want to see. This will mean, most likely, working into the correct floor pan the transmission hump (which can be adapted from the interior tub, with a bit of spacing with strip styrene to compensate for the distance between the chassis floor pan and the bottom edge of the hump from the interior tub. The same thing would also be true of the driveshaft tunnel--that could be scratchbuilt, if necessary from one of the larger sizes of Evergreen styrene tubing, split in half, and extended with strip styrene as needed.

The interior side panels would probably need to be scratchbuilt, but by foil-casting such details as door handles, window cranks etc., the rest likely would be only surface carving of any upholstery details on the sides. However, the side panels will need to be made taller, and it is possible that suitable extensions can be made at the bottom of the stock panels. Also aiding in this process would be that the door sills almost always protruded into the floor space a bit (actually the top side of the rocker panels. The same "extending" would need to be made on the bottom of whatever seat you plan to use, to raise it up a distance equal to the thickness of the discarded interior tub, plus whatever airspace may have been between the kit's chassis pan (upper surface) and the bottom of the interior tub.

Not a one-evening project, but not an insurmountable task, either.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 24, 2004 9:54 PM
biscuitbuilder... has you on the right track he's given you good advice here to which I'ld add

I would take your tub kinda loke he suggested and I would sribe the edges of the inside at the door panel sides where they meet the floor also front and rear on each side of the trans/ driveshaft tunnel but keep it (tunnel) with the upper doorpanel/tub section so you'ld be removing actually about a inch or so wide strip of plasic on each side of tunnel

sand tunnel smooth.... glur to floor pan bondo it and add the retails to it ... for reference you might get pics from a wrecking yard car of your subject for the low and high spot details etc..

Walt
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 28, 2004 2:19 PM
Here's something I've done on dirttrack stockers before:

Make a silicone mold of the "bottom" of the chassis by covering it with silicome sealant in a tube from a hardware store, using a toothpick to work it into the corners and details. First layer about 1/4" thick.
When that's dry, add another to get it thick enough to hold together. When that one is dry, carefully peel it off. This gives you a negative mold of the chassis pan. If the chassis had a frame molded on, now is the time to fill the channels in with more silicone, giving you a flat floor pan mold.
Now cover the new mold with a release agent. (a thin layer of vaseline works in a pinch) then repeat the proccess on this new mold giving you a possitive mold of the chassis pan.
Finally, use a body putty like plumbers A/B epoxy. Cover the interior floor of your chassis with a thin layer of putty and press the possitive mold down into it.
This makes the floor pan slightly thicker than scale, but with the body on it should never show. More importantly it is the exact reverse of the underside just like stamped steel floor pans.

Just my two cents worth...

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