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Flocking

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Twin Cities, MN
Flocking
Posted by colinm on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 7:30 PM
I've got a question about flocking.

The way I originally learned how to use flocking was to paint the interior where you wish to apply the flocking with a matching flat paint then add the flocking material before the paint dries.

I'm currently having a problem with the Acrylic paint I'm using, it's drying too fast -- before I can add the flocking. Banged Head

I've heard about another method where one would use a clear-drying glue instead of paint, like Testers glue for clear parts. Has anyone heard of that or tried it Question Question Question
"So I bought it, brought it home, and built my first tangerine-scented glue bomb" - Patrick Mulligan from 'Starting Line' -- August 2002 issue of Scale Auto.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 8:31 PM
I have heard of that but haven't tried it ..

MoparMan
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Orange County, CA
Posted by SoCalCarCulture on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:17 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by colinm
I'm currently having a problem with the Acrylic paint I'm using, it's drying too fast -- before I can add the flocking. Banged Head


Try doing a section at a time rather than the whole interior, that way you should be able to apply the flocking while the paint is still wet.
Dave Lindsay http://www.socalcarculture.com
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:23 PM
can i get flocking at any fabric store?

jared
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Orange County, CA
Posted by SoCalCarCulture on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 10:00 PM
Craft stores usually carry it but from my experience some of the best out there is Ken's Kustom Fuzzi-Fur, it comes in 42 colors and seems finer than most of the others. I've never seen it clump as some of the cheaper products will. One more tip, if you're trying to match a color mix flocking colors together and shake until you get the color you need. Sometimes it takes mixing multiple colors to get the match you want.

Ken's Kustom Fuzzi-Fur

Dave Lindsay http://www.socalcarculture.com
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Orange County, CA
Posted by SoCalCarCulture on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 10:02 PM
here's the correct link to Ken's Fuzzi-Fur in the above post...

http://www.scaledreams.com/KEN'S.HTM
Dave Lindsay http://www.socalcarculture.com
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 10:22 PM
i use regular elmers glue brushed on, kens is the best stuff to use though. never had trouble either.

Dave http://public.fotki.com/FIREMODELMAN/

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 10:29 PM
I totally agree with you guys. I've used nearly all the brands over time & Ken's is by far the best. & I have always used Elmers glue. I recommend to water it down a little so it's not so thick ( you don't need any clumps!). & if you mess up it's so much easier to strip. You can literally pick at a corner & peel away.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Twin Cities, MN
Posted by colinm on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 7:17 AM
Thanks for all the advice guys.

I think Testors Clear Parts Cement and Elmer’s glue are pretty much the same thing. The Testors may be a bit thinner though and easier for this application.

Another question for those of you who have used the Elmer’s technique. Since the Elmer’s glue and clear parts cement dry somewhat glossy is there a chance of having a glossy tone show through under the flocking when using this method?
"So I bought it, brought it home, and built my first tangerine-scented glue bomb" - Patrick Mulligan from 'Starting Line' -- August 2002 issue of Scale Auto.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 20, 2003 3:32 AM
I use the Testors Clear Parts Cement. I just brush it on and sprinkle the flocking from a salt shaker.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 21, 2003 4:27 PM
never tried flocking before, but after reading these posts I think I'll try it. Any cautions or tips before I try?
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 21, 2003 8:53 PM
Bigdoghoyle, just try it out on some spare parts first to get the hang of it, but it is pretty easy to work with and the results are great.
The only other thing I can say is hold your breath when your face is near it. If you breath out near it it gets airbrone very easily.
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 22, 2003 10:49 PM
If you use flat ENAMEL paint it doesn't dry as fast as acrylic and is easier to apply the flocking.Smile hope this tip works for you.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Dayton, OH
Posted by mach12003 on Sunday, November 23, 2003 9:11 AM
Does everyone use flocking on all your kits or just the open top cars? I've never tried it before but can see where it would add a great deal of realism to a convertible.

Next convertible I build will get flocking..... Big Smile

Eric
Eric Cole More Pics Here: http://photobucket.com/albums/y197/justdande/
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Monday, November 24, 2003 12:23 AM
hey colinm, if you use enough of the flocking you wont see any of the glue under it, but if you dont get it 'packed down' good you will see some spots show through.

Dave http://public.fotki.com/FIREMODELMAN/

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Twin Cities, MN
Posted by colinm on Monday, November 24, 2003 8:51 AM
Yeah, I usually use Enamel rather than Acrylic for flocking. But only had a flat black (obviously doing a black interior) in Acrylic and hadn't had the opportunity to get to the LHS to get some Enamel.

Tried the clear parts cement / Elmers glue method and wasn't too pleased with the results. I probably didn't pack the flocking down good enough. The paint technique seems to work best for me so I'll stick with that (with Enamel paint though).

Thanks to everyone for their suggestions Approve. At the very least I tried something new and that's the best way I've learned new techniques. Smile
"So I bought it, brought it home, and built my first tangerine-scented glue bomb" - Patrick Mulligan from 'Starting Line' -- August 2002 issue of Scale Auto.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 25, 2003 9:04 PM
I use Tamiya's paints and it works well for me.... but i do one side ata time, usually!!
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Orange County, CA
Posted by SoCalCarCulture on Thursday, November 27, 2003 7:51 PM
One advantage to using acrylics as a base is that if you goof-up or change your mind they can be removed with a little windex and you can start over.

I see one person mentioned using a salt shaker to apply the flocking, I've always used a strainer to apply mine, it helps break up any clumping that may occur and gives a more even look to the application.
Dave Lindsay http://www.socalcarculture.com
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 1:11 PM
What I do is I paint the floor the flat color of the flocking I am going to apply. Then, after ti dries, I brush on regular Elmer's glue. After that, I use a food strainer to sift the flocking on. I then let it dry. Finally, I just brush off the extra. Works great every time. HTH, MarkSmile
  • Member since
    September, 2010
Posted by BrianR on Saturday, November 29, 2003 9:56 AM
Using the strainer seems to give a "finer" grain to the flocking. I used to just dump it on and press it down but I kinda like the look of the sifted flocking better. Hey, it's usually not visible anyway (except in convertibles) so it's all for the building pleasure anyway.
Brian
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 3:59 PM
I use old spice bottles that I add a small peice of screen to for my flocking is kinda like a built in strainer that way works great for me ..
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 8:31 AM
Hey guys, just thought I'd put in my 2 cents, but it ain't worth a nickel, hehe. But seriously, any of you big scale modelers out there(1/12 or larger) try this: "Flock" using plain ol felt from the craft store. It looks very real. The only thing to remember is to put masking tape on one side so it holds it's shape when you cut it. Then, use rubber cement to hold it in. You may need to adjust in places for thickness, but it works great. Got that tip from of all places a radio control car magazine! Thanks for readin' and happy hobbyin!
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 10:32 AM
i generally use flat enamels and do one side at a time. keep working at it though there are really alot of great tips here to try.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Southern Maryland
Posted by Likittysplit on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 10:50 AM
Hey Grim, I'm working on the Mono 1/12th Camaro and thought about felt, but came to the conclusion that it would look too out of scale... regular flocking looks great, especially on the lower door panels.

Proud owner of a 1:1 1997 Camaro Z/28 30th Anniversary edition and 2004 Monte Carlo SS supercharged Dale Earnhardt, Sr. "Intimidator" edition.

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: north georgia
Posted by roadhawg on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 6:00 PM
only tip ive got for using flocking is make sure your fresh paint job is covered up. the stuff works great but the workbench looks like a cat exploded.

I went to a "gentleman's club" because the sign said they had all the hottest models. I thought it was a hobby shop. Man, was I ever disappointed.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Ambler, PA
Posted by revshag on Sunday, January 04, 2004 7:17 PM
I've only used flocking once and it seemed to go pretty well. I sprayed the floor with a thick coat of Krylon flat black. I had a large container that I stuck the part in and dumped the flocking over it. the I pressed it in to get in on real good. I dusted the loose stuff off and the excess was all in the container. When I was done I poured it back into the original container. It worked pretty well.

Chris
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Fairfield, Ohio
Posted by Drackopolis on Monday, January 05, 2004 6:02 PM
I mask off the areas that aren't getting carpet and then airbrush the paint onto the part a little heavy and wet. then i place the part in a small box (tape it to the box bottom), add the desired color of flocking and shake it until the part is completely covered.
Once the exposed paint is completely covered i remove the part from the box and add just a tad bit of pressure to the surface to ensure a good tack and let it dry.

I do it like this because i got tired of having flocking all over the floor when i was done, lol. this way it all stays contained. using the airbrush and covering the whole part in a few passes gives me the time i need to attach the flocking and gives me consistancy across the part being flocked.
Besides, using a paint brush takes forever and i have to manage my time between many different projects.
Those i get paid for come first...
Rev. James D. Baker www.bakerministries.org
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by kevlar86 on Monday, January 05, 2004 8:19 PM
Great tips guys!! thanks for sharing Thumbs UpThumbs Up Smile
Kevin check out My photoalbum http://photobucket.com/albums/v648/kevlar86/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 12, 2004 11:13 AM
I use an arts & crafts white glue thined with water and it works quite well. Tried the paint techniques once and didn't like the results. I do paint the area with the complimentary color (flat not gloss) before applying the white glue. I use a sifter and popsicle stick to evenly spread the flocking.

HTH

Gerry
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 12, 2004 10:31 PM
I thinned Elmer's 50-50. Works okay!


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