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interior pillars

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  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Boston, MA
interior pillars
Posted by nkhandekar on Monday, August 29, 2005 11:14 AM
Can anyone suggest a way of installing A and B pillars on the interior. The ones moulded on the inside of the window greenhouse are just not wide enough. It seems to me that there are two ways of doing this
1. Glue the pillars to the window greenhouse
2. Glue the pillars to the interior sills.

Either way has its problems as far as I can see in getting good joins.

Can anyone help out? Thanks.
NK
"There is water at the bottom of the ocean" Talking Heads http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 29, 2005 2:09 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by nkhandekar

Can anyone suggest a way of installing A and B pillars on the interior. The ones moulded on the inside of the window greenhouse are just not wide enough. It seems to me that there are two ways of doing this
1. Glue the pillars to the window greenhouse
2. Glue the pillars to the interior sills.

Either way has its problems as far as I can see in getting good joins.

Can anyone help out? Thanks.
NK


You're not saying what car this is for, which might make a bit of difference. You say the model has window glass with side windows already molded to it? If so, that might present some problems with appearance, since almost all injection-molded clear "glass" is much thicker than scale, and might make added roof post detail look kind of strange.

I've done this in the past. Even though I did it on a '27 Model T Sedan body, the idea I came up with should work with just about any model car body.

To do what I am going to suggest, you'd want to replace the existing kit window glass with vacuum-formed glass, probably all the way around, to get thinner glass, giving you clearances to make pillars that will look right. Why would this be, you ask? Simply put, most cars have pretty narrow A-posts (the post at the sides of the windshield), and with a model car kit, the A-post doesn't have much width, and a lot of that gets taken up by the windshield glass, particularly if it's a post-1950 car with a curved or wraparound windshield. The same can be true if the C-posts (at the sides of the back window) are narrow, the kit back window glass will take up most of the space on the inside of that post as well. Clear plastic stock, such as Evergreen clear styrene, acetate, or polycarbonate can be vacuum-formed, or even heat-formed over the existing kit glass to get a compound curved winshield or back glass, or for that matter, if the car only has simple curved glass in these areas, you can just flex the clear plastic to the curve you need.

On the Model T, here is how I made the insides of the roof posts, along with "channels" to capture and hold the glass: (Keep in mind, that to do this, note that window glass in a car is framed all the way around--certainly necessary if the windshield and back glass are curved, even slightly)

I picked a thickness of Evergreen styrene strip that matched the thickness of the clear plastic I used, in my case, .020" thick. This strip also had to be narrow enough so as to not take up any more than 50% of the width of the A or B-posts. These vertical strips extended down the inside of the body, perhaps 1/8" below the bottoms of the window openings (so that the interior panels would have enough clearance for the glass, to trap it solidly in final assembly) I glued strips of this in place, on the inside of the body's existing posts, as close to the middle of the inside of the B post as I could (the Model T A-post had to have clearance for the windshield glass, so I allowed for that as well). I also glued strips of this size of Evergreen across the tops of the windows, spaced up high enough to be able to 'trap" the thin clear plastic solidly.

I then made the interior of the posts, and that across the tops of the doors and rear quarter windows, also did these same steps with the back window, from .020" Evergreen strip, but as wide as the B-post, and as wide as the A-post, taking into account the needed clearance for the windshield (windshield had to be built up off the body, then installed as a unit). Once I installed the interior strip-panels across the tops of the doors on the inside, across the tops of the quarter windows and rear window, I had a fully framed set of windows, with slots all the way around, so that I could simply slide pieces of the clear plastic stock in, from below, almost as if they were roll-down windows. In the case of the Model T, there were additional strips of thin styrene added around the completed openings to represent the garnish, or trim moldings on the inside.

Once the windows were framed, all I had to do was cut the clear plastic stock to size, and slide it up into the window openings, and presto! Windows that were clear as water, with no ripples or distortion, and I could leave one door glass partially down, as if it had been rolled part way down.

Here's a pic of the car, in primer, under construction, in which you can see (not the easiest thing to see, but it's there!) what I just described:



Now, as a thought here: Is this project a hardtop (like a 50's or 60's Impala or Bonneville hardtop?). If so, those cars don't have a full B-post, although the Trumpeter '60 Bonneville shows like it does--pillarless hardtops often did have side glass framed in chrome channel, fixed to the glass itself, which rolled up and down with the windows, so keep that in mind.

Any questions? I'd bet I, or others who've done this before, can help you out here.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Boston, MA
Posted by nkhandekar on Monday, August 29, 2005 2:47 PM
BiscuitBuilder, Thank you very much for that insight and the views of your beautiful Model T.
The car I am building is the Tamiya kit of a 1990 Celsior...better known as a Lexus. When I look at the real car the pillars have a bulky presence which isn't there in the kit. I hadn't really considered the option of cutting out all the windows and vac forming new ones, and to be honest, this may be a step too far for this project as it is going to be part of a diorama.

Please keep the suggestions coming.
"There is water at the bottom of the ocean" Talking Heads http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 29, 2005 5:09 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by nkhandekar

BiscuitBuilder, Thank you very much for that insight and the views of your beautiful Model T.
The car I am building is the Tamiya kit of a 1990 Celsior...better known as a Lexus. When I look at the real car the pillars have a bulky presence which isn't there in the kit. I hadn't really considered the option of cutting out all the windows and vac forming new ones, and to be honest, this may be a step too far for this project as it is going to be part of a diorama.

Please keep the suggestions coming.


I see. I wonder, though, if the A-posts on this particular body aren't wide enough to allow you to go ahead and detail out the insides of the roof pillars, but simply cutting away the side glass, and then proceeding with what I suggested, but just on the sides themselves? That would add just that extra, added touch of realism, perhaps even some additional "gotcha" factor to the car, and in turn, your diorama?

Food for thought?

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: East Tennessee, Hillbilly Country
Posted by crzyhorse on Sunday, September 04, 2005 7:40 PM
You could try sculpting them from "sculpey" or a similar oven-hardening clay. Just mold them to fit the inside of the kit "glass" then remove, bake & paint

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