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simulating woodgrain

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  • Member since
    May, 2008
simulating woodgrain
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 11:52 PM
Any Ideas on how to simulate wood grain without using decals...


Eight Ball MoparMan Eight Ball
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Thursday, November 13, 2003 12:14 AM
hi moparman, i onced used testors flat light brown, then 'streaked' regular flat brown down the panels(or rather across) and the effect was pretty decent. hope this helps.

Dave http://public.fotki.com/FIREMODELMAN/

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Arroyo Grande, CA
Posted by MojoDoctor on Thursday, November 13, 2003 12:34 PM
That's a tough one to paint, but FIREMODELMAN Dave has the right idea. Experiment with different color combinations and practice practice practice!

Instead of decals, when I had a large area to finish like wood, I went to a house paint store and picked up several brochures that had photos of wood staining products, then cut these out and glued them to the model with white glue. A photo of wood will also work, but remember that a clear coat will probably ruin the paper, so this must be done last!

Good luck!
Matt

Matt Good judgement is the result of experience, Experience is the result of poor judgement. Mark Twain

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by dubix88 on Thursday, November 13, 2003 2:26 PM
HEY,
Check out the October 2003 issue of FSM. Go to the website and click on back issues. There i a good article in there about how to paint woodgrain.

Randy
"If a woman has to choose between saving an infants life and catching a fly ball, she would choose to save the infant without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry Semper Fidelis
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: waterloo,ia
Posted by thiodolfr on Saturday, November 15, 2003 9:40 PM
my favorite is to use wood veneer sanded down paper thin, then apply like a decal. looks just like real wood, because it is. the tricky part is getting it thin enough without breaking it.
thiodolfr
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: West of Chicago
Posted by garyo on Sunday, November 16, 2003 8:48 AM
How about contact papers?
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, November 16, 2003 7:48 PM
Thank you all I will have to try these...
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 7:07 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by garyo

How about contact papers?

I used contact paper on an older Blazer once. It worked OK, but the grain was too big.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 8:41 PM
you can try the contact paper, but i know that there is a paint out there that is wood color and than for the grain you can take a dark flat brown and thinner and it should simulate wood grain. don't over do it on the paint and thinner or you will have to much dork brown

hope it helps.

jared
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 10:26 PM
thanks again great tips all..
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Thursday, January 22, 2004 7:29 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by pacodiablo

QUOTE: Originally posted by garyo

How about contact papers?

I used contact paper on an older Blazer once. It worked OK, but the grain was too big.


I have used it on the outside for wood grain panels, but not the interior(too big). I posted this as a topic before i stumbled upon this thread. Since the was interior i guess my exterior post is ok.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by kevlar86 on Thursday, January 22, 2004 8:12 PM
I watched an episode of Monster Garage and the guy at the end of the show painted on wood grain flames by using paint and cheese cloth. It was the "nut shaker" episode. They converted a Ford f150 into a nut shaker. The flame detail was amazing. Smile
Kevin check out My photoalbum http://photobucket.com/albums/v648/kevlar86/
  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: Davison, Michigan
Posted by street36ch91 on Friday, February 27, 2004 3:34 PM
I use the dry brush method. There is an article in the October 96 issue of Scale Auto Enthuiast written by Tim Powers. I have done two woody models using this method with outstanding results. Read the article and follow his instructions and you can't miss.As soon as I can take some pics I will post them on Fotki and let you know.

Al Rogers   Flint Area Auto Modelers

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 29, 2004 11:23 AM
I've had great success with woodgraining, using Testors (or Modelmaster) "Rust", which is actually a fairly bright reddish-brown, drybrushed with Testors (or Modelmaster) "Rubber", which is a brown-black color. This does seem to approximate a walnut, or even a dark mahogany wood-grain effect.

Once done, I brush on a couple of coats of Johnson's Future Floor Polish, for a glossy effect.

Biscuitbuilder
Cool
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 01, 2004 1:07 PM
I could kick myself.
Last week I was at a sight that had a photo of small scale wood grain lumber. I was thinking if I printed the photo, I would have an excellent source to use for woodgrain interiors.
Alas, I can't remember where I saw the photo and needless to say I didn't make a copy.
Now, if someone runs across a site with a picture, please let us know and we can play with the idea.
Sad John Smile
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 04, 2004 9:34 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by dubix88

HEY,
Check out the October 2003 issue of FSM. Go to the website and click on back issues. There i a good article in there about how to paint woodgrain.

Randy


I have that issue, its basically just streaking different brown/dk. red colors lightly.
  • Member since
    January, 2004
Posted by Gerard on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 11:14 PM
I saw that FSM article and thought that the simulated grain way way too big in scale. I think real wood would have the same problem. I like the idea of a scale photo of wood grain, then apply. Wood ship modelers use woods with very tight grain to simulate coarser grain 1:1 woods, maybe an idea for us. This is an intriguing question though- depending on the scale you are working in, is the wood grain really going to be discernible?
Gerard> Currently building: 1/700 What-If Railgun Battlecruiser CG-X
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, April 25, 2004 1:30 AM
I got some real thin wooden panels from a cigar store. I got this tip in one of the magazines. A cigar store will give you the stuff. It is used as dividers for cigars in the finer cigar stores.

I had a Willy's pickup I built for slot car racing and retired it to the case. One day I took it out and trimmed the interior panels and cab and dashboard with this stuff. I also trimmed the back outer panels of the truck bed.

I just went downstairs and it still is stickin and lookin great.

The wood is paper thin, you can clear coat it to make it shine or stain it. It is real easy to break this stuff, so I suggest you put tape on the back when you cut it with an exacto knife, the carefully remove the tape after you have your shape and glue it in place.

Half the fun of this hobby, is finding "stuff" laying around and making it work for your models. This goes way back with me when I used the old hat pin with a colored head for the gear shift. We all know that one.

Have fun using some real wood.
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: north georgia
Posted by roadhawg on Sunday, April 25, 2004 6:06 AM
you can also get adhesive-backed wood veneer from Kens fuzzy fur.....
http://www.scaledreams.com/KEN%27S.HTM

I went to a "gentleman's club" because the sign said they had all the hottest models. I thought it was a hobby shop. Man, was I ever disappointed.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 4:24 PM
See if you can locate a copy of Scale Auto Number 105 October 1996 ( I don't ever throw them away, LOL) There is a great How To by Tim Powers.
  • Member since
    October, 2003
Posted by Andy Lilienthal on Thursday, April 29, 2004 8:06 AM
Just to let you know, you should be able to purchase this copy through our on-line catalog:

http://store.yahoo.net/kalmbachcatalog/scale-modeling.html
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 23, 2004 11:32 AM
I use pieces cut from photos in woodworking magazines. You get a variety of color, and it's easy to find a grain in an appropriate scale. Just cut the panel to fit and white glue in place.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, May 26, 2004 9:48 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Jared

you can try the contact paper, but i know that there is a paint out there that is wood color and than for the grain you can take a dark flat brown and thinner and it should simulate wood grain. don't over do it on the paint and thinner or you will have to much dork brown

hope it helps.

jared



Hey jared, is dork brown a new colour that we could use on our models?
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, June 17, 2004 9:30 PM
I happen to have a method that make wood that looks so real it will make your head spin.
Things you will need are: FLAT, light Beigh ENAMEL
1 small tube of Burnt Sienna artist oil paint
1 small tube of Raw Umber artist oil paint
1 high quality Red Sable paint brush, flat
1 clean rag (no thinners)

Step 1:
Paint the area you want wood with the light biegh enamel. Use a brush. Brush strokes are our friend this time. LET THE ENAMEL DRY FOR AT LEAST 4 DAYS. This is very important. If you don't let the enamel harden you'll wind up with a big mess. I would personally wait a week.
Good colors to use: Humbrol 63 (Sand) , Testors Model Master 1706 (Sand), 1735 (Wood), or if you inist on water based (not recommended) Tamiya tx-59
Step 2:
Mix the Raw Sienna and Burnt Umber paints together on a pallet. I like to use a sheet of steryn. A mix of 5 parts Raw Sienna to 1 part Burnt Umber is a good starting point. Adjust to your personal taste. Yellow Ochre paint can also be added or used to subsitute either color for a lighter shade wood.

Step 3:
Paint over the light beigh enamel with the artist oils. Cover completely.

Step 4:
This is the payoff. Using your high quality Red Sable brush, start brushing the paint OFF the model and removing the paint from the brush on the clean rag. The best method is to pinch the bristles between your thumb and forefinger on the second knuckle. Apply moderate pressure and pull the brush out of the rag. This will remove the paint and keep the bristles nice and straight. Keep removing the paint until the base enamel starts to show through the oils. It won't take long. When you like the way it looks, stop. The key is to keep the brush strokes long and straight for the length of whatever area you want grained. Also, make sure the brush is dry with no types of thinners on it for at least 24 hours prior to this operation. Same with the rag. Any trace of thinners will make the oils break down, and ruin the effect.

Step 5:
Let dry. Artist oils take a LOOOONG time to dry. More than a couple of days. I would wait at least a week before handleing the peice for any amount of time. The results are well worth the long waits required for this method.

Now, you may think you can just use a waterbased base color to bypass the initial hardening time, and you can, but the results woun't be nearly as good. Tho oils really imbed themselves in the enamel coat, giving it a very natural appearance. It's a very easy method and all your friends will be impressed.
Jim
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 20, 2004 8:07 PM
After reading this thread, i figured why not give this a try. All i used was Testors acryl paints. Leather, Tan, Black and i mixed up a shade made up of leather and tan 50/50. I'll still do some more touch up work on the dash and gauges, but here's what i have so far over the course of two days.

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Tucson Arizona
Posted by Camaross1stgen on Monday, June 21, 2004 11:08 AM
Muy Bueno! (Very Good..) and ironiocally I'm working on the same dash..now I have inspiration!

-Ray
Ray Parkman aka Raging Asian

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