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Interior color.....

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  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Northwestern PA
Interior color.....
Posted by Hemizach on Friday, June 17, 2005 9:44 AM
Does anyone know of a Beige or tan color that is common at any hobby store? I don't care who makes it, but I need it for the interior of a 1941 Willys. I was hoping it would look kind of like leather. I am only 13 years old, I don't have an airbrush so it has to be in a rattle can. Keep it basic because I am new to modifying my model cars with paint and such. Any way to make my interiors more detailed? I would also like some tips to make them more realistic.
"People need to stop complaining and go build something."
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Colorado
Posted by bertu on Friday, June 17, 2005 10:17 AM
As for colors: check out the testors line at http://www.testors.com
Most of their paints are available in any hobby shop, a subset is even carried by stores like Walmart and some grocery stores.

For interiors I have used Testors Cream enamel with good success. It looks, as you might suspect, creamy, and goes really well with 50s paint schemes, but it is gloss. The flat tan is darker and might go well for some types of floor mats.

Other tips for the interior: use different colors and shades to highlight different things. Alternate gloss, flat and semigloss. Use 'dry brushing' - lightly brush over surface detail with an almost dry paint brush, the paint sticks to the edges and creates nice highlights. Use gray or silver on black.

Oh, and I don't restrict myself to rattle cans. In fact, I hand brush almost everything so far, maybe I just enjoy the challenge. With some practice, and good sanding and polishing you can get a good smooth surface that way too. I found it easier to get a smooth even coat with flat paints, which I then cover with Future to get a the gloss coat.

Hope this helps. I'm sure others will have more tips to add detail,

- Bertu
  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Milwaukee
Posted by JakeCouture on Friday, June 17, 2005 5:57 PM
I use Testors flat tan (no. 1167) and use the tried and tru method of rubbing a little skin oil over it once it's dry to give it a leather-like sheen.
In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups. There are the police who investigate crimes, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories. Doink Doink! Jake Couture
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Friday, June 17, 2005 7:18 PM
I do the same as Eyeleveleast, minus the oil. Semi-gloss paint works well.
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Monday, July 04, 2005 1:12 PM
Some tips on how to make em more realistic. Buy clear coats and dull coats and semi-gloss coats (available as spray of brush paints). Then paint the interior and go over it with these in very light coats until you get the perfect sheen which is crucial to making the seats look "plush".

Another good tip, add seatbelts, those always look nice. Purchase 1/16 inch ribbon, if its suede ribbon then that is the absolute best. Then check out the model car gargage or detail master and buy some photoetched seatbelt hardware. Now your set.

If you're doing an interior with woodgrain, Always use one color as the base color, say a light brown. Next go over with a dry brush filled with the color that represents the grain, say a darker brown. Kind of stroke it on to get the woodgrain pattern. Then you might want to go over with a wash of the darker color. Makes it look very real every time Smile,Wink, & Grin

You could flock the interior if you so wish.

If you wanted to, you could make a little map to go in the interior. I like to take a real map, cut of a rectangular piece, then fold it to give the appearance of a folded up map in the interior.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 04, 2005 4:31 PM
go with sevens ideas he knows what hes talking about
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Monday, July 04, 2005 6:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by masu01

go with sevens ideas he knows what hes talking about


Thanks tom, your a pal Smile,Wink, & Grin
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Saint Louis, MO
Posted by dodgeon24s on Monday, July 04, 2005 9:33 PM
seven does kno wut hes talkin about he does some very nice work
current projects-56 ford pickup,ford f350,dodge deora,cadillac escalade,mitsubishi eclipse FNF email me-hummerh2_06@yahoo.com
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Monday, July 04, 2005 9:39 PM
Gee I must say I appreciate all the complimets all the sudden! like Wow. Thanks Dodgeon24s!!!!!
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Monday, July 04, 2005 10:05 PM
Also you can use Faux Fabrix or "Make it Suede" both of which are spray paints that create a good texture for certain interiors. for more information, click here
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 07, 2005 10:34 PM
Instead of saying "click here", why don't you tell us how it worked for you, unless of course you've never used it?

Cool
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Thursday, July 07, 2005 11:00 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by californiakid

Instead of saying "click here", why don't you tell us how it worked for you, unless of course you've never used it?

Cool


I haven't used it CK, I have heard of it and read about it and I was thought I would show it to him just in case he would be interested. Just trying to help.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, July 10, 2005 4:13 AM
hey cali have you ever recommended somethig without using it? i bet you have so just shut up will you????
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Saint Louis, MO
Posted by dodgeon24s on Sunday, July 10, 2005 8:24 PM
no problem anytime seven!
current projects-56 ford pickup,ford f350,dodge deora,cadillac escalade,mitsubishi eclipse FNF email me-hummerh2_06@yahoo.com
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Sunday, July 10, 2005 10:12 PM
Thanks again Masu01 and Dodgeon24s!!!!! Smile,Wink, & Grin

Anyway CK, I said click here because I wanted him to be able to see alot of different interior detailing ideas, and see how they look when done so that he would be better informed to make a decision about his interior. Not only that, but if I show him that link h can get information from some of the best and most experienced modelers.
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Saint Louis, MO
Posted by dodgeon24s on Monday, July 11, 2005 10:21 AM
i have used the feaux fabric spray paint and that stuff is amazing....kinda expensive but worth it if u want something different in your car...i have the gray feaux fabric...i really like this stuff i think you will too!
current projects-56 ford pickup,ford f350,dodge deora,cadillac escalade,mitsubishi eclipse FNF email me-hummerh2_06@yahoo.com
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 11, 2005 3:54 PM
H-Zach,
I used Model Master - Afrika Braun (they spelled it that way, I didn't)Big Smile - which is enamel and Flat Interior Tan (lacquer) on my Impala. Majority of the interior is brush painted. The lighter color is the Afrika Braun (Africa Brown maybeConfused
http://public.fotki.com/ZanderM/model_cars/p1010147.html
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Monday, July 11, 2005 6:02 PM
Some of the tips are well meant but not always appropriate.

Pre-sixties cars did not generally have seatbelts. Installing them on, let's say a box-stock 1948 Ford, would be very incorrect.

There are those who swear by flocking; to me, it's too thick/way out of scale. I've never used it, even on my regionals-winning (first place) '57 chevy convertible.

Hemi? I would suggest that you crawl first, then walk, then run. Trying to hinge doors/hoods/etc is a very ambitious task. At your age (13), it might be a bit much and lead to discouragement. You have plenty of time to refine your skills and will probably be teaching old coots (like me) a thing or two in a few short years.

Most of all, be humble.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Monday, July 11, 2005 9:54 PM
Seven? Let's keep in mind (as I mentioned earlier) the requestor is 13 years old and may not have the financial wherewithall to fund these efforts.

Yes, we all learn from mistakes, but you should not force feed your concepts about "how it is done", especially the way you would do it, on the others. Your tips should be just that... tips, not a mandate

Now, getting back to the original question, I used Krylon Khaki Beige (a gloss enamel) on this, a '48 Ford Convertible interior

I then sprayed it with a flat clear. Brushing will also work, but keep the paint thin.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Thursday, July 14, 2005 10:56 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by BigTallDad

Seven? Let's keep in mind (as I mentioned earlier) the requestor is 13 years old and may not have the financial wherewithall to fund these efforts.

Yes, we all learn from mistakes, but you should not force feed your concepts about "how it is done", especially the way you would do it, on the others. Your tips should be just that... tips, not a mandate

Now, getting back to the original question, I used Krylon Khaki Beige (a gloss enamel) on this, a '48 Ford Convertible interior

I then sprayed it with a flat clear. Brushing will also work, but keep the paint thin.


Big Tall Dad

Opening and hinging doors is not as hard as some people think, I believe it is very overated. The way I do mine is to take polyester thread and tie each end of it to a flexi-file (first pic), but if you don't have one thats okay. Then using this as a saw, simply cut open the doors on the panel lines. Its incredibly easy to get it straight because the thread follows the panel lines. Its also impossible to slip and scratch the body. And third, a tight fit is guaranteed. Sometimes the fit is so perfect, you have to make the gap wider so you will be able to close it with the added thickness of paint.
This method works incredibly well IMO. Infact I cut out all of the doors on this model in about fifteen minutes.

To see how I do the hinges, click here


This is the tool I made by tieing thread to either end of the flexi-file.

Here is how I use it to cut out the trunk.

Here the trunk has been cut out and this method leaves so little gap it almost appears as if it hasn't been cut out.

Here it is completely hinged, hood, doors and trunk, and all of the other parts easily fit around the hinges without problems.

Seven
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 18, 2005 4:59 PM
So far, what works for me without being really complicated is to use flats for carpet, semi-gloss, (aka Satin) for vinyl. Ebaymotors has a lot of pictures, so try to find the car on there for basic interior colors, or maybe just model a car that's on there so you won't have to mix and match a bunch of options, but you can if you want.

You only have to be "correct" if you want to be. Have fun, and learn new techniques. That's why you buy another car, so you can do things to it that you didn't do before.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Friday, July 22, 2005 9:51 PM
Model master makes a decent tan paint in a can.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 23, 2005 12:55 AM
This is the decidedly "low-tech, low-budget" approach...

Tamiya Flat Black paint, with seatbelts made of masking tape. I placed a piece of tape on a scrap piece of sheet styrene (you can use any clean, flat surface), brushed on some blue paint, added some silver at the end after the blue dried, cut out the appropriate size pieces I needed, and stuck 'em on the seat.



Like I said, low-tech, but looks pretty decent for minimal effort. Smile

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