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help with detailing black interiors...

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  • Member since
    June 2005
help with detailing black interiors...
Posted by James Cozart on Thursday, June 16, 2005 1:02 AM
my black interiors always turn out so plain and boring, so I've resorted to white interiors, which, IMO,look better and show more detail.

however,my current project, a replica of the "Las Vegas" 69 Camaro convert, has a black interior.

I dont really buy a/m stuff other than plug wire, and rims, so i would prefer tips for things to do with paint, to help bring my black interiors up a notch...

I've been painting my dash,pkg shelf, and seats in flat, and the tubs,door panels, etc, in a semi-gloss, and it helps a little but not much...
James Cozart.... Chevy guy with a Camaro addiction, and a closet affliction for Mopars!!
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Thursday, June 16, 2005 8:04 AM
Have you tried washing the interior with a color that is one shade lighter than black?

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, June 16, 2005 8:30 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by James Cozart

my black interiors always turn out so plain and boring, so I've resorted to white interiors, which, IMO,look better and show more detail.

however,my current project, a replica of the "Las Vegas" 69 Camaro convert, has a black interior.

I dont really buy a/m stuff other than plug wire, and rims, so i would prefer tips for things to do with paint, to help bring my black interiors up a notch...

I've been painting my dash,pkg shelf, and seats in flat, and the tubs,door panels, etc, in a semi-gloss, and it helps a little but not much...



To add to what BigTallDad suggests, have you thought of looking at a real car's black interior? A bit of time with a camera can be pretty helpful here.

Think a bit of the various materials that an interior of say, a modern car, is made. There will be hard plastic for the dash/instrument panel, usually ABS, perhaps trimmed with a bit of soft PVC (Vinyl), PVC or leather for the steering wheel covering, Vinyl and/or cloth for the seat upholstery, soft Vinyl for the side panels (including the "kick" panels below the dash in front of the doors), some sort of cloth (often a flannel material) for the package tray, and of course, carpet on the floor (which may or may not extend up the side panels a few inches).

For the various plastic or vinyl parts of the interior, I like to use a semi-gloss black, perhaps mixing a bit of gloss black with semi-gloss to make the seat vinyl just a bit shinier (but not "glinty shiny"!) than the dash or instrument panel, same with the steering wheel, particularly the rim. If the seat has cloth inserts, these should be dead flat (not many shiny interior cloth patterns these days!), perhaps flat black with just a drop of gray in it to lighten it just a tad for contrast. Carpeting should be dead flat black unless you are going to use flocking on it.

This is an area of a car where Modelmaster Acryl paints really work, as they can be brushed on, especially black, with no caking or serious buildup--the stuff dries extremely thin and smooth. If the seats of the 1:1 are all vinyl or leather, using a bit of natural skin oil (wipe your finger on the side of your nose or forehead!), rubbed into semi-gloss black will give a subtle shiny highlight to the raised detailing on the seat, giving depth and character to the finish as well.

Hope this helps just a bit!

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Louisville, KY
Posted by jroc1989 on Thursday, June 16, 2005 8:54 AM
Do you work with chrome foil? A lot can be achieved with it as well. Here's a shot of a black interior I did for a '75 Camaro with chrome foil, flocking, a photo etched guage bezel, and the skin oil thing that biscuitbuilder mentioned:

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Colorado
Posted by bertu on Thursday, June 16, 2005 10:18 AM
Good to see other peope in the same boat as me ... spicing up plain interiors.

I have had good success with drybrushing some of the surface detail. I haven't used washes yet, but I presume the effect is similar. I usually dip a brush into some gray or silver paint and then wipe the brush on paper until is nearly clean, that is it leaves only a minimal amount of paint on the paper. Then lightly brush over the detail such as vents, ashtray, radio etc. I tend to hold the brush such that the side touch the surface, not the tip. The effect is that the remaining paint sticks to the edges of the detail, thus highlighting them. I found it quite important to use a color that is not too far away from the main color, so a dark gray or silver for black for instance.

Also, as others suggested, some chrome foil works wonders.

Finally, on my last project (Dodge Viper) I painted the gauges bright white and then put a drop of Future (or clear coat) on them to make them shiny. Looks really cool and makes them stand out like in a real race car.

You could also customize the interior by adding a second tone to some panels or the seats. Again, depends on the car you are trying to model ...

Hope this helps a bit,

- Bertu
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Thursday, June 16, 2005 10:31 AM
To me, drybrushing achieves the opposite effect that washing provides: drybrusing highlights the raised areas and washing gets into the recesses.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Boston, MA
Posted by nkhandekar on Thursday, June 16, 2005 11:04 AM
Black is often very dark blue, brown (sometimes even purple!). So when you are drybrushing or applying washes try using different colours. If you read books on how to paint in oils, you can pick up hints on how to get good shadows and highlights (read as washes and drybrushing) with colours you never thought of ...e.g. I was painting a Union 76 sign and I used dark red for the shadow and yellow for the highlights...it made the orange POP.
"There is water at the bottom of the ocean" Talking Heads http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Milwaukee
Posted by JakeCouture on Thursday, June 16, 2005 11:55 AM
Drybrushing, washes, foiling, and PE or other aftermarket stuff all help to add realism to the many details in the interiors. Also, a lot of texture can be applied simply with paint. For cloth seats, I usually blot a little paint on after the base coat has been applied.

Also, very few things in like are ever true black. Most modern interiors are made up entirely of varying shades of gray. I deal with this issue a lot at work (custom picture framing), where people want to use a black frame to "bring out the black" in a photograph or painting. Aside from the fact that a frame or mat should never "bring out the color" of anything, the "black" that you think you see in a photo or painting is never as black as the black of a frame. Similarly, the "black" of the carpeting, the seats, the dash vinyl, the dash plastic, the door panels, the package shelf, the headliner, the sterring wheel, etc. are all different shades of gray. We all paint these parts either semi-gloss, flat, or gloss black, and they often look good, but not quite as realistic as tones of gray.

And that's just for the basic colors. For mild weathering, or to add contrasting or highlighted colors, "black" interior components can be washed or detailed with a very dark shade of blue, or a lighter shade of gray.

Recently I detailed a Blazer promo, and I painted the interior flat black, anthracite, graphite, charcoal, stone gray, light gray, and dark gray.


In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups. There are the police who investigate crimes, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories. Doink Doink! Jake Couture
  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Boston, MA
Posted by nkhandekar on Thursday, June 16, 2005 2:23 PM
jake, that interior looks great. It's just asking for some candy wrappers, food crumbs, windscreen ads coffee cups and cassette cases (maybe a pen/pencil or two). Well done.

(BTW, when I frame a B&W photo I never use black. I always go for a very very dark brown frame and denglass)
"There is water at the bottom of the ocean" Talking Heads http://public.fotki.com/nkhandekar/
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Thursday, June 16, 2005 4:48 PM
Cassette cases? What are those?

Just kidding. On a blazer, I'd expect to see empty beer cans, fast-food bags, and a box or two of ammo.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, June 16, 2005 7:02 PM
I prefer to use different shades of black as well as other materials & textures. This gives an overall "photographic" effect. Usually for a black interior I use Semi-gloss, matt, flat and sometimes metallic. I also use different clear coats to further expand the pallette (flat, semi-gloss, etc.).

Other textures can include carpet material, velour door panels, wood, etc.

Here are some interior pictures of my 1:12 '69 Camaro. Have fun!

Stevie









  • Member since
    August 2004
Posted by 7055 on Friday, July 8, 2005 6:41 PM
I like how you have the keys sitting on the dash Stevie, That looks very nice! Bow
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, July 9, 2005 5:28 AM
those are some very good tips all y'all.

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