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Painting deep-set gauges?

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  • Member since
    May 2008
Painting deep-set gauges?
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 12, 2005 10:06 PM
How do you paint the gauge detail on gauges that are sunken deeply into the dash, like those on a 68 vette? I've tried pins, toothpicks, and safety pins, but I can seem to get everything looking OK. Any suggestions?
  • Member since
    May 2004
  • From: Charlotte, NC
Posted by ragtop63 on Thursday, May 12, 2005 10:15 PM
I havent tried this yet. I recently went to a show in Newton, KS, where a guy had the most awesome gauges in his Cuda dash. He told me he drilled out the molded gauges, painted the dash, then printed out small gauge faces on his computer. He then added some color detail with pencils and glued them on the back of the dash. They were set pretty deep and looked great. I am going to try this on my '66 Nova Prostreet kit that's in the works. It may also work for you!

Ragtop is now in Charlotte! Check out my builds!

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 12, 2005 11:15 PM
oh, i get it! I will try that! i'll tell you how it works out!
  • Member since
    November 2003
Posted by scalespeedworks on Friday, May 13, 2005 1:40 AM
I've done the printed gauges and I like the look.

I tried it with a sharp pin and for the size it actually looks pretty good. Nobody's going to be close enough to notice they're just blobs so I don't care. I think I could do it neater next time.


Ron http://www.scalespeedworks.com http://public.fotki.com/lauron/rons/model_cars/
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 13, 2005 5:13 AM
Scale that looks very good to me . Ill take that anyday!!!!
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 13, 2005 9:37 AM
That looks good to me! I think I'm going to try that. Thanks for the tip!
  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: RIGHT HERE, where 'er you?
Posted by koda360 on Friday, May 13, 2005 9:41 AM
Another tip, if the dash is molded in black plastic, and you want white face gauges, paint the face flat white, use a needle to scrape the paint off the raised surfaces (numbers ect) after it's dry. Then you just need to paint the indicator needle red or orange. Apply a few drops of Microscale Crystal Clear for the clear cover and wahlah...
"Dream as if you'll live forever, live as if you'll die today" James Dean
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Reedsville, Wisconsin
Posted by Nathan on Friday, May 13, 2005 9:42 AM
I use prismacolor artist pencils they come in every color imanginable and are on sale at hobbylobby right now

 My Fotki Album Still under construction

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 13, 2005 10:03 AM
Also, to get a very nice (and realistic!) lens over the top of any instrument face on a dashboard, a bit of clear 5-minute epoxy will do that, and that can be worked with to give just a bit of "domed effect" on the gauge (very few instrument faces except in years past) were truly flat glass or plastic) which can really make a detailed instrument stand out.

Biscuitbulder
  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: RIGHT HERE, where 'er you?
Posted by koda360 on Friday, May 13, 2005 2:34 PM
Crystal Clear will do the same, don't think it'll dome though. Gonna have to try that epoxy. Great tip bb1.
"Dream as if you'll live forever, live as if you'll die today" James Dean
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 14, 2005 1:18 PM
re: glazing the instruments; when you've finished use a few coats of oil paint varnish. it doesn't craze easily and doesn't seem to have the surface tension which creates a blobby, or domed look. (i agree with biscuit, most dial covers aren't flat, but if you dome them too much, which is what happens naturally with a thicker medium such as resin, they look too domed in 1/25. so for all intents and purposes i treat dial glass as flat and hence use a thinned picture varnish.)

For painting dials, my only advice to add to the collective genius of the above would be to paint the dial first, then paint the surrounding dash afterwards. this way you're painting down to the edge of the dial, rather than trying to keep the dial colour off the surrounding dash. if you're spraying your dash (for 'modern' cars i use the vinyl repair spray from a local motor shop) then you can do the same, and mask the dials with a blob of blu-tak over each one. numerals are a bit tricky on deeply dished dashes. the only one i did was a '62 chevy dash, and i used the pin method. which does work well with practice.

enjoy your build.

Will
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 14, 2005 4:07 PM
first mask and spray in the color you want #'s .... then use a striaght pin or ultra fine brush to do the needle for the guage in red or orange etc...

let dry thouroughly.... then lightly spray the color for the back ground over top very lightly then while paint is still wet use a ultra fine bush dipped in thinner to just lightly run the back grond color by a washing action from the raised areas....

the totally dry color underneath will show then but darker color will run into the recessed low area and stay... leaving a well detailled looking guage...

to put a final touch to guages use a clear epoxy to put over top of the gauge you detailed out after all the other paint has dried a couple of days...

Walt
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 21, 2005 7:21 PM
i find that if you uze a 000liner brush,and some pointed toothpiks you can get into those tiny holes and come up with some pretty decent and convincinggauges.paint your backround color,bry brush the numbers,and pick out dials with the pointed toothpiks.finish it with some 5min.epoxy for gauge faces9use a pointed pick to flow out the epoxy and drop it in0. moose t
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 26, 2005 3:23 AM
the 69 charger (Revell) came with dash decals, then I used the Dry brush on the rest.
Waddya think?
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, June 21, 2005 3:09 PM
Paint the dash in whatever color your using. This was my process for my 68 Vette. Paint the face black and then take a fine brush clipped down to the nub and dip it lightly in white paint. Then drybrush by placing the tips of the brush down into the hole and LIGHTLY putting pressure on while rotating the handle. Then take a needle and paint the needle orange. It takes practice but it works.Alien

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