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Faux Wood

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  • Member since
    May 2008
Faux Wood
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 6, 2005 7:57 PM
I'd be interested to know how people would go about reproducing the fake wood on 'woody' wagons seen from the 50's to present day. In my very limited experience I thought the effect needs a clearly fake grain (i.e- overemphasised) combined with a quite smooth, almost as glossy as the surrounding paintwork, finish.

how do you folks achieve this finish.

I've got a feeling this one could be opened to a poll.

1)paint
2)printed surfaces
3)decals

To be honest, the best attempt at faux wood was arcturus's Pinto wagon.(on a thread about here somewhere) I just wish his method of using the kitchen-surface adhesive laminates was applicable to compound curves- the biggest curse of any woody builder, i tentitiavely suggest. anyway. i'd be interested to know what you guys think.

Will

4) other....
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Saturday, May 7, 2005 5:21 AM
Here ya go

http://www.scaleautomag.com/sca/community/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15396

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 7, 2005 6:40 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by wehf100

I'd be interested to know how people would go about reproducing the fake wood on 'woody' wagons seen from the 50's to present day. In my very limited experience I thought the effect needs a clearly fake grain (i.e- overemphasised) combined with a quite smooth, almost as glossy as the surrounding paintwork, finish.

how do you folks achieve this finish.

I've got a feeling this one could be opened to a poll.

1)paint
2)printed surfaces
3)decals

To be honest, the best attempt at faux wood was arcturus's Pinto wagon.(on a thread about here somewhere) I just wish his method of using the kitchen-surface adhesive laminates was applicable to compound curves- the biggest curse of any woody builder, i tentitiavely suggest. anyway. i'd be interested to know what you guys think.

Will
4) other....


Will,

"Faux" (or imitation) wood grain was achieved by the use of Di-Noc, which was an early printed PVC (vinyl) sheet material, with pressure-sensitive adhesive on the back side, which we know today as "shelf paper" (even though Di-Noc was never paper.

Di-Noc was (as are the modern-day equivalents) smooth-surfaced, only moderately shiny, and could be printed in any sort of wood-grain pattern, any colors, even printed to look like marine planking.

I believe the first user of Di-Noc wood grained vinyl was Chrysler, when in 1947, they had discontinued the molded plywood body panels on their Town & Country convertibles, using instead standard sheet metal panels from their regular convertible line, covered in Di-Noc, while retaining real oak framing, giving the stunning looks of the Town & Country genre, but at a fraction of the cost of the all-wood 1946 bodies, and of course, much less maintenance (no need to varnish an entire body shell once or twice a year!).

Chrysler dropped the Di-Noc treatment at the end of the 1948 model year, and of course, the Town & Country wood-framed convertible after 1950, but Ford then stepped in for 1951, replacing the wood-framed station wagon tailgate with a stamped steel unit, with, you guessed it, Di-Noc trim.

Ford then dropped all use of wood for station wagon paneling for 1952, and so 1952-later Country Squire wagons used Di-Noc trim to replicate the mahogany paneling of a true "woodie", framed in real ash 1952-54, and decal-finished fiberglas framing trim from then on into the 1960's.

Textured vinyl with a wood-grain coloring and the feel of natural wood was used through from the early 1960's onward to give an effect of walnut accents on dashboards, door panels and center consoles, essentially the same as the original Di-Noc, but with a wood-grain surface texture. This material found considerable use on inexpensive home furniture on the era as well, particularly on TV and Stereo cabinets.

Interestingly (and a bit of a sidelight here!), faux wood finishes were very popular in the interiors of American mass-produced cars from about 1930-31 until this was finally dropped by Chrysler Corporation about 1951-52. Used on window and windshield garnish moldings and dash panels, this was done by the use of large decals (or decalomania's as this material was originally known), over medium to dark brown painted surfaces. That treatment looked very sharp when new, but of course, over time, with exposure to the sun (streaming in through relatively un-tinted window glass), and wear & tear, these decals deteriorated, and the processes by which they were originally applied have pretty much faded back into history. So, when people restore cars which used this method to make stamped steel sheet metal to look like wood, they do it very much as we might do on a model, by painting first a brown base coat, then using coarse cloth to wipe on the accenting colors (much as we would dry-brush the same parts on a model).

By the mid-1930's, real wood interior trim had all but disappeared from assembly-line cars, all the way up to top-of-the-line Cadillacs & Packards, replaced by the decal method, only the relatively small numbers of coachbuilt bodies still using real mahogany or walnut; for the most part, the only real wood trim still being installed being on British luxury cars.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 7, 2005 12:18 PM
so how'd you think you'd reproduce these effetcs? only biscuitbuilder could produce 'the history of woodgraining'. probably very close in obscurity to the book i have to read this week for my studys, 'The footnote: an intruiging history'.

I always think that when one knows how the effect on original 1:1's was produced, or replicated ( through restorations), one can think of new approaches to making a scale representation.

What do people think about creating this effect on a model? (i opened a new thread bigtalldad, as i thought the finished effect was very different to replicating real wood, unless you people think the same methods apply.)

Will
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Saturday, May 7, 2005 7:45 PM
Sorry Will, I wasn't paying attention. When I see the multiple posts on Flocking, Wood, and Leather I tend to get blase.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 8, 2005 11:59 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by wehf100

so how'd you think you'd reproduce these effetcs? only biscuitbuilder could produce 'the history of woodgraining'. probably very close in obscurity to the book i have to read this week for my studys, 'The footnote: an intruiging history'.

I always think that when one knows how the effect on original 1:1's was produced, or replicated ( through restorations), one can think of new approaches to making a scale representation.

What do people think about creating this effect on a model? (i opened a new thread bigtalldad, as i thought the finished effect was very different to replicating real wood, unless you people think the same methods apply.)

Will


I was talking with Fred Cady (the original model car aftermarket decal guy) yesterday, at the Hoosier Model Car Association contest & swap meet, about wood-grain decals. Fred has some very nice wood-decals, two colors on the sheet, perfect for the paneling of a woodie station wagon. We did talk at length about possible different types of wood-grain effects, and I came away with a feeling that he was interested in the possibilities, so we shall see.

Biscuitbuilder

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