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whats the best color for wood grain

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  • Member since
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whats the best color for wood grain
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, April 16, 2005 8:55 PM
i usally use i think flat tan
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Saturday, April 16, 2005 9:08 PM
I usually use real wood

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
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  • From: Toronto
Posted by s10man on Saturday, April 16, 2005 9:10 PM
It depends a lot on the car and the type of wood used. Oak as is sometimes used for truck beds is usually a honey colour unless it has been painted the same colour as the bed. The wood used for woodie wagons was often a light honey oak colour, although a number of different woods were used in their construction. Dash panels and other interior trim on high end cars is often burled walnut which has its own distinctive dark colour. So really I think its a matter of doing some research on what was actually used for the particular car you are modelling and then trying to replicate that colour to the best of your ability. Bill
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Posted by 7055 on Sunday, April 17, 2005 12:20 AM
Testor's brown or leather for me.
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, April 17, 2005 3:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by s10man

It depends a lot on the car and the type of wood used. Oak as is sometimes used for truck beds is usually a honey colour unless it has been painted the same colour as the bed. The wood used for woodie wagons was often a light honey oak colour, although a number of different woods were used in their construction. Dash panels and other interior trim on high end cars is often burled walnut which has its own distinctive dark colour. So really I think its a matter of doing some research on what was actually used for the particular car you are modelling and then trying to replicate that colour to the best of your ability. Bill


To elaborate a bit on what Bill has said, much depends on the kind of wood you are trying to replicate.

Personally, I would use real wood to create a bed floor, for example, but that's me. For a modern, "restored" look, nothing beats the look of a highly polished oak-planked pickup bed with chrome skid strips (PE skid strips are out there), but to replicate oak with paint, I would use a light tan, drybrushed with a very dark brown, then clear coated with one of the "yellowing" clear coats (Modelmaster clear in the bottle comes to mind) for a more golden look to it.

Woodie station wagon bodies, through the late 30's, tended to be made from birch plywood for the panels, with oak and/or ash framing. These woods all varnish out to golden colors, but the grain is very fine with ash and birch, so any dry-brushing should ideally be very, very finely done. About 1940, Ford started using honduran mahogany plywood for woodie paneling, still using ash for framing. Mahogany can be done by painting first with Testors or Modelmaster rust, which is reddish-brown, then very fine drybrushing with Testors or Modelmaster rubber, which is a brown-black color, looks great. Finish off with clear.

Walnut is very dark, of course, particularly when varnished, so I have used flat dark browns for it, drybrushed with Modelmaster Rubber, to get a bit of grain effect on it.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, April 18, 2005 7:44 PM
What about interior wood trim? Not really dark wood, but something like a tradtional dresser color...
  • Member since
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  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Monday, April 18, 2005 7:54 PM
I'm serious abut using real wood. I go to the cigar store in "the mall" and ask for the wood that separates the layers of cigars. Sometimes I get nada, others 15-20 sheets. It's free, has a beautiful color (but can be bleached to white) and is thin, about .027" The coin in the pic below is a dime

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 1:23 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by BigTallDad

I'm serious abut using real wood. I go to the cigar store in "the mall" and ask for the wood that separates the layers of cigars. Sometimes I get nada, others 15-20 sheets. It's free, has a beautiful color (but can be bleached to white) and is thin, about .027" The coin in the pic below is a dime



BigTallDad,

I for one, really appreciate some of the things you do with veneers, particularly cigar veneers. I have a couple of fairly large sheets of this material that a former associate at Purdue University handed me (he, in his other life, was a dealer in fine cigars!). You've certainly given me some food for thought, when I finally screw up my courage enough to attempt a truly wooden body for a 1:25 scale woodie wagon!

One of the possible projects I have in mind is to do a correct '47 Ford Sportsman, the woodie convertible, which will require some considerable reworking of the Revell convertible body, in order to get the "inset" body side panels, and the taller, much more squarish trunk lid. Most definitely, veneer, such as comes with fine cigars will get a very close look--but first I have a Hupmobile to finish!

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 8:00 AM
I'm actually working on a '48 Sportsman right now; had all the mahoganey (never could spell that word) done and was working on the ash when we lost power after hurricane Charlie; the ensuing humidty caused cracks. On this second iteration, I'll seal both sides of the wood. BTW, the Sportsman cars had the taillights in a vertical orientation, to clear the wood on the trunk; other converts had the taillights in the horizontal plane, so you'll have a bit of filling and scratchbuilding for the proper taillights.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 9:57 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by BigTallDad

I'm actually working on a '48 Sportsman right now; had all the mahoganey (never could spell that word) done and was working on the ash when we lost power after hurricane Charlie; the ensuing humidty caused cracks. On this second iteration, I'll seal both sides of the wood. BTW, the Sportsman cars had the taillights in a vertical orientation, to clear the wood on the trunk; other converts had the taillights in the horizontal plane, so you'll have a bit of filling and scratchbuilding for the proper taillights.


BigTallDad,

It goes a bit farther than simply changing the position of the taillights. The Sportsman convertible had a wider rear (trunk) area than does a steel coupe or convertible, enough wider that Ford used the rear fenders produced for the station wagon and sedan delivery.

The mahogany side panels of the body shell are actually set in (recessed) from the A-posts by the depth of the ash framing, the ash being virtually flush with the sheet metal in front of the wood body, then the body of course, widens out, and doesn't taper inwards at the rear fenders. The trunk area is taller, doesn't slope like the standard convertible, and being wider aft of the leading edge of the rear wheel arch, had to have the narrower station wagon rear fenders.

Neat cars!

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    January 2004
Posted by Gerard on Tuesday, May 3, 2005 10:30 PM
I recently had some good luck with my Jag XK120 dash, I glued on a photo of some fine grained wood that I cut out from the Garrett Wade fine tool catalog. Has a sheen like it was varnished wood dash, subtle grain, looks rather convincing.

BTW, if you have never seen their catalog, you owe it to yourself to check it out- the photography is magnificent, and you'll want to buy everything they sell. A very dangerous catalog for those who are fat of wallet and weak of will...
Gerard> Currently building: 1/700 What-If Railgun Battlecruiser CG-X
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 5, 2005 10:02 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Gerard

I recently had some good luck with my Jag XK120 dash, I glued on a photo of some fine grained wood that I cut out from the Garrett Wade fine tool catalog. Has a sheen like it was varnished wood dash, subtle grain, looks rather convincing.

BTW, if you have never seen their catalog, you owe it to yourself to check it out- the photography is magnificent, and you'll want to buy everything they sell. A very dangerous catalog for those who are fat of wallet and weak of will...


I just realized I have some small bits of veneers from Garrett-Wade, and another supplier out of New York City, whose name escapes me at the moment (having a brother and a nephew both into fine-quality furniture crafting sure does help!!!). Some of their veneers are really finely grained, and almost always, very, very thin as well.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 6, 2005 3:59 PM
I painted mine using a mix of browns, black & tan
  • Member since
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  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Boss_Hotrod on Friday, May 6, 2005 5:11 PM
Here is a tutorial I wrote about paintin gwood grain. The results speak for themselves.

http://twinturbocamaro.proboards45.com/index.cgi?board=help&action=display&num=1108516682
http://public.fotki.com/69Hotrod/model_cars/ http://www.imagestation.com/mypictures/
  • Member since
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  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Friday, May 6, 2005 6:00 PM
The tutorial is good, but (to me) the results look "too busy" and I'd hate to try that on a complete door or trunk (as in a Woodie).

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 6, 2005 7:44 PM
are you representing real wood or the faux wood used on 'woodies' since the early fifties? i saw a tutorial ages ago where someone reproduced wood by painting a flat base colour and using a brown pencil to draw the woodgrain on. to me, this seemed a bit silly for real wood, but it looked spot on for the fake wood used on later cars. its an idea worth experimenting with if that's what you're trying to achieve.

for that glossy, 'not wood, but close' effect these wagons had (and yes, i've only ever seen one in life- a 53 chevy wagon), i cannot over-emphasise the closeness that Gerards suggestion of using photopaper attains. it's a bugger that it'll not form compund curves or else it's be perfect. infact i may open another seperate thread about fake wood. don't want to steal your thread.

Will

p.s- tried searching for this? theres bound to be something about such a contentious issue. i would reckon nearly everyone has their own techniques for achieving the look they like. I remember one of my first posts being about it.
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 7, 2005 10:26 AM
The effect looks really good, Hotrod, but the colors contrast too sharply for my taste. slave1 has kinda what I'm after. Maybe I'll try again some other day...
  • Member since
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  • From: The hobby room
Posted by 454chevelle on Monday, May 9, 2005 9:37 PM
Have you tried Scale Equipment Ltd.
On this page you will ten links.

http://www.seltd.net/cgi-bin/ez-search/search.cgi?X344897



The first link has a paint & brush tutorial for applying wood grain.

The next 7 links are Scale Equipment Ltd. “Wood Grained Decals”.
You will find seven different grain patterns in 5 different sized sheets. They all come in interior & exterior patterns. All decals are four color printing.

Scale Equipment Ltd. recommends using the Micro-Scale setting system for best results. Using Micro-Scale will also assist adhering decals to curves.

Of special note are the interior patterns. These are sized to give the best visual representation for the interior of a vehicle.

Rosewood Pattern
Burl Pattern
Cedar Pattern
Cherry Pattern
Laminate Pattern
Maple Pattern
Oak Pattern
  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: The hobby room
Posted by 454chevelle on Monday, May 9, 2005 9:41 PM
Sorry Iave you wrong liknk page the first time.
Try it now.
http://www.seltd.net/cgi-bin/ez-search/search.cgi?X344897Shy
  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: The hobby room
Posted by 454chevelle on Monday, May 9, 2005 9:46 PM
Sorry about that gaawin. Just enter "wood grain deals" in Scale Equipment Ltd. search window to get to the wood grain paint & brush tutorial and decal sets.
  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Way down west in the UK
Posted by bassman on Wednesday, May 11, 2005 10:50 AM
Anyone know of a good wood color paint that I can find in the UK (e.g Humbrol,Revell or Tamiya) ??

http://www.flickr.com/photos/garyk77/

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