SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

HEY

3312 views
20 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: USA
HEY
Posted by dubix88 on Sunday, November 09, 2003 5:53 PM
HEY,
I guess i am the only one to post in here so i would like to say hi to all of you new people. So, ummmm, Hi. Now lets have some fun.Big Smile

Randy
"If a woman has to choose between saving an infants life and catching a fly ball, she would choose to save the infant without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry Semper Fidelis
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, November 09, 2003 6:48 PM
HEY, i'm new and was wondering if you or anyone knew if baby powder works to make gloss pint flat for interior insert color panels?
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Monday, November 10, 2003 4:09 AM
hi jared, ah ,your not the one from the subway ads are youBig SmileBig Smilejust kidding.i myself have never heard of doing this, seems to me though that the baby powder might not disolve enough in the paint and would be left clumpy? you could try using a dull coat after you painted the panels, just my opinion, anyway welcome to the new forumsCoolCool

Dave http://public.fotki.com/FIREMODELMAN/

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 10, 2003 5:06 AM
I agree with Dave though I have never tried baby powder as a dulling agent I have used dullcote. I did once try baking powder in a was that was too thin many many years ago! WHAT A MESS and waste of good paint and thinner!
  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by karbuildr on Monday, November 10, 2003 5:58 AM
Years ago, we used to use Talcum powder to dull gloss paint. You used to be able to buy it any corner drug store, but now I believe the only places that sell it are beauty supply shops. Baby powder is way too fine as a dulling agent, and contains other products (scents, additives, etc.) that would preclude using it as a dulling agent. I sometimes use military flat paints, mixed 50-50 with gloss paints for my interiors.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 10, 2003 10:18 AM
I've used the talcum powder trick, but it took quite a bit of work to get it just right. Mixing the flats and gloss works well, a little experimentation to get the mix just right and not mess up the color. I've also shot dull-cote from a rattle can into a spare bottle and mix it with the gloss. It doesn't tend to change the color too much.

Dan
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 10, 2003 10:38 AM
I like Dull Cote. I typically use it on gloss black to make it flat – works great on exterior plastic items such as black-plastic mirrors, or if you've simply run out of flat-black! Big Smile

I would think that baby powder would thinken the paint like adding corn starch to gravy that's too thin.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 10, 2003 4:39 PM
thank you for your ideas. i have the dull coat and thought about useing it but was wanting to hear your ideas.thanks again

jared
  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by Alex on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 12:03 PM
Yeah, dullcoat is the way to go.
"Aerodynamics is for people who can't build engines" - Enzo Ferrari -
  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by OffRoadRacer on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 11:51 PM
Ahh Dubix88,
Should'nt that gone in the
Introductions forum ??
Jus' givin ya a hard time man, LOL !!
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 17, 2003 12:12 PM
Another good way to simulate vinal/leather is to use flat paint and then polish it to a dull shine. I used this method for my 66' Shelby Mustang GT-350H and it turned out really well. Here are a few pics of the seats.



  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: New Prague MN
Posted by Miguel Mejia on Monday, November 17, 2003 12:53 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Idontknow

Another good way to simulate vinal/leather is to use flat paint and then polish it to a dull shine. I used this method for my 66' Shelby Mustang GT-350H and it turned out really well. Here are a few pics of the seats.




What did you use to polish the seats with? I never heard of getting a leather look that way.

Current project: 1965 Chevy Impala Lowrider

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Dayton, OH
Posted by mach12003 on Monday, November 17, 2003 4:20 PM
[/quote]

What did you use to polish the seats with? I never heard of getting a leather look that way.
[/quote]

I know you didn't ask me and I don't want to butt in to your conversation (sorry Idontknow).

When you spray with flat paints you can just take a soft cotton cloth and rub over the paint after it dries and it will put a light sheen on the rasied areas leaving it with a flat finish in the low spots. It looks very realistic. You don't actually have to use any kind of "polish", just the cloth. Sometime a little Pledge furniture polish works wonders too........ (I prefer lemon since it smells good Big Smile spay a little on the cloth the rub the seats, dash, etc...
Eric Cole More Pics Here: http://photobucket.com/albums/y197/justdande/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 8:47 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by mach12003

QUOTE:

What did you use to polish the seats with? I never heard of getting a leather look that way.


I know you didn't ask me and I don't want to butt in to your conversation (sorry Idontknow).

When you spray with flat paints you can just take a soft cotton cloth and rub over the paint after it dries and it will put a light sheen on the rasied areas leaving it with a flat finish in the low spots. It looks very realistic. You don't actually have to use any kind of "polish", just the cloth. Sometime a little Pledge furniture polish works wonders too........ (I prefer lemon since it smells good Big Smile spay a little on the cloth the rub the seats, dash, etc...


What he said. It looks great w/out all of the hassle.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 9:26 AM
Also try rubbing your finger over the high areas after the paint has completely dried. The oil from your skin will leave a nice sheen and you can control where you want it.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: New Prague MN
Posted by Miguel Mejia on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 2:01 PM
I knew about rubbing with your finger I guess I never thought of just using some cloth. I will try it on my next interior.

Current project: 1965 Chevy Impala Lowrider

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Dayton, OH
Posted by mach12003 on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 6:46 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by DanTheGrouch

Also try rubbing your finger over the high areas after the paint has completely dried. The oil from your skin will leave a nice sheen and you can control where you want it.



One of the few times we actually benifit from getting our fingers on the paint... LOL
But I agree, this little trick does work....

Eric
Eric Cole More Pics Here: http://photobucket.com/albums/y197/justdande/
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 09, 2004 1:51 PM
I have used semi gloss black to create a good sheen on the seats, will have to try the flat coat then polishing it out. Sounds like it may work better.

Jeff
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 11, 2004 9:18 AM
The finger rubbing works best after a dinner at KFC!Big SmileBig Smile

Later,

Grant
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 13, 2004 8:49 AM
Won't the grease from KFC give it a gloss coat? Kinda defeats the purpose....Banged Head

Jeff Big Smile
  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Trondheim, Norway
Posted by Slabbedask on Friday, February 13, 2004 11:49 AM
I often use white artists oil paint, the one in a tube, and drybrush interior details, tiresant a lot of other details too. It gives flat paints a little sheen, and makes details stand out too, creating a sense of depth.
You're never too old to have a happy childhood...! http://public.fotki.com/slabbedask/

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our privacy policy