SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

interior color chips

3235 views
11 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Ambler, PA
interior color chips
Posted by revshag on Monday, January 31, 2005 7:57 AM
Are there any online resources that have interior color chips? Autocolorlibrary.com has all the exterior colors, but I'm looking for the interior colors. I'd appreciate any help.

Thanks,
Chris
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 31, 2005 10:53 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by revshag

Are there any online resources that have interior color chips? Autocolorlibrary.com has all the exterior colors, but I'm looking for the interior colors. I'd appreciate any help.

Thanks,
Chris



Chris,

That's a very tall order, seeing as how car interiors haven't had much in the way of painted surfaces since the late 70's or early 80's, As modern cars use molded plastic dashboards and such window reveals as they might have, they aren't painted, but rather the colors are molded in.

Even for earlier cars, there wasn't much in the way of any interior touchup paint colors, so I'd suggest looking for colors in the military or craft paint range that will do it for you--Oh, and don't be bashful about looking at Floquil model RR paints, as there are a number of usable colors there as well.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by 7055 on Friday, July 22, 2005 6:06 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by biscuitbuilder1

QUOTE: Originally posted by revshag

Are there any online resources that have interior color chips? Autocolorlibrary.com has all the exterior colors, but I'm looking for the interior colors. I'd appreciate any help.

Thanks,
Chris



Chris,

That's a very tall order, seeing as how car interiors haven't had much in the way of painted surfaces since the late 70's or early 80's, As modern cars use molded plastic dashboards and such window reveals as they might have, they aren't painted, but rather the colors are molded in.

Even for earlier cars, there wasn't much in the way of any interior touchup paint colors, so I'd suggest looking for colors in the military or craft paint range that will do it for you--Oh, and don't be bashful about looking at Floquil model RR paints, as there are a number of usable colors there as well.

Biscuitbuilder


I thought I was told Autocolorlibrary showed interior colors too?
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 02, 2005 12:29 PM
I've seen only perhaps a couple of years of interior paint chips at best over the years, and that was one thing I have looked for, high and low, for a long time. I suspect this is due, most likely, to there not being a very large market in crash repair, over the years, for factory-matching paints to repair a painted dash or sheet metal window reveals.

That said, modern PPG paint chip book pages do give, in many instances, paint codes for interior painted parts, but no chips. I suspect that by cross-referencing these codes will give a matching color to an exterior paint, with a flatting agent added to eliminate the high gloss.

Of course, trying to get an exact match for cloth upholstery is, and likely will remain, a problem, simply because fabric dyes do not match paint colors exactly, an almost impossible thing due to the completely different processes involved paint vs cloth. Complicating this of course would be all those 50's and early 60's cars with patterned fabric on seats--hard, if not impossible to replicate without decals.

I think, that sometimes, perhaps more often than not, what is achievable is what I like to call "the illusion of realism", meaning that if one can create the "looK" close enough to the real thing, most observers will never notice an interior trim color being off by a shade or two--not likely for example that for every Revell '59 Impala on a contest table will there be a correctly done 1:1 car in the parking lot for comparison. Of course, in the years 1955-65 or 66 at least, color-matched vinyl upholstery did get used, and that stuff often was within a half-shade to a shade of the corresponding exterior color, just lacking the high-gloss shine of the body surfaces.

This, in the world of replica stock model building, is where research really comes into play. If there are no color chips or fabric swatches available for study (and be careful about images online--digital cameras, scanners, and your monitor do not unequivocably tell "the truth" about colors, they can't!), but at least getting a firm idea in mind as to what colors are appropriate in the interior will help. Going to a craft store can unearth a gold mine of paint colors for interiors. Michael's, Hobby Lobby, and other large craft or art stores carry massive selections of paints from Delta, Ceramcoat, Folk Art, and Apple Barrel. Check these out--even if the exact color you have in mind isn't available, some mixing of colors can get you there.

Also, if you happen to know anyone in the graphic arts profession (doing advertising art, product development, etc., where color selections are critical), ask them (or ask around at any graphic arts company you can locate, if they have any old, outdated Pantone Mixing System (PMS) color books. Pantone books are often changed out every couple of years, due to unavoidable fading (slightly, but just enough to throw everyone off), and it's generally vitally important to people involved in preparing printed material to be absolutely right on for color (corporate types are particularly anal about this anymore--lots of corporate colors are Pantone specific). A new set of Pantone books is expensive, over $200 for the set, but used ones that are a couple of years or more out-of-date aren't worth much to people in the profession, so it is quite possible that you can come up with at least the coated chip book--mebbe offer a few $$ for the privilege. The coated chip book of Pantone has literally hundreds of shades of each color, and those can be used to come pretty close to matching even colors that aren't necessarily PMS based. It's worth a shot, folks!

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Watertown ny
Posted by gratch73a on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 2:32 PM
I think it would be more feesable to look for automobile upholstery colors.
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 2:56 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by gratch73a

I think it would be more feesable to look for automobile upholstery colors.


IF you can find the "swatch" books that are supplied to car dealers, yes. Those are, however, pretty scarce (generally only one to a showroom), hard to find, and bring some serious $$ when you find one for sale.

A better alternative would be to find dealer brochures, which almost always have full color shots of the interiors of cars. autolit.com is perhaps the largest source for dealer brochures and literature on the planet--if they haven't had it, good chance it doesn't exist. Be prepared, however, to spend some money--old dealer brochures can be expensive. Of course, for current-year cars, brochures on them are as easy to get as going to the dealership and requesting them.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 3:10 PM
autocolor library.com does give mixing info on interior colors and which parts were done in which colors often... for example...

60's & 70's Mopars it is very very good in that area... often colors are ultra close to body color but use a dull coaat to kill the shine for interior use or a slight black wash or white wash to soften the color out slightly will yield a very realistic color correction for interior reference photos are a must for getting it right though...

Walt
  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Huntington Beach CA.
Posted by foamer62 on Thursday, August 04, 2005 11:28 AM
On most of the paint chip sheets that I have lists the mixing formula for the painted interior parts on the back of the sheet but does not show the actual color. Smile

Jim
" See the USA in Your Chevrolet "
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 04, 2005 5:54 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by rammed88

autocolor library.com does give mixing info on interior colors and which parts were done in which colors often... for example...

60's & 70's Mopars it is very very good in that area... often colors are ultra close to body color but use a dull coaat to kill the shine for interior use or a slight black wash or white wash to soften the color out slightly will yield a very realistic color correction for interior reference photos are a must for getting it right though...

Walt


Walt,

True enough, HOWEVER, Autocolor is in the business of selling paint only, and the painted portions of car interiors is (with the exception of say, 65-66 Mustangs with their pressed steel inner door panels, as an example) only a minor part of the equation. For example, from the early 30's out into the mid-late 60's, about the only exposed sheet metal parts of an interior are the dashboard and window garnish moldings, which of course are painted (true also with the fascia and lower parts of a padded dash).

The rest is upholstery, either in vinyl (on luxury cars, leather abounded in many instances), or fabric. PPG-Ditzler, whom Autocolor represents, did/does do paint codes and color names for some, but not all, interiors, from the early-mid 70's on, but no color chips or other color-print references.

This is why I made the rather lengthy set of suggestions above that I did--having done a fair share of research into all kinds of cars, professionally, over the years, for my personal builds, resin kits, and diecast model development. There just isn't any substitute for color photographs of the real car, both interior and exterior, to understand the colors and color combinations available. Unfortunately, with upholstery, samples don't often show up, even on eBay, as upholstery sample books (called "swatch books" in the industry) are really quite rare, usually only one to a showroom--and most of those got thrown away over the years--I suspect that new car dealerships still toss last year's swatch books into the dumpster come new model changeover--they were/are used only for showing customers what is available, should the buyer decide to either order a car built the way they want it, or have the dealer work a "dealer trade" for it (which happens more often than most people imagine). So, color pics are pretty much the way I've done it over the years, along with picking up old dealer sales brochures at 1:1 swap meets.

To get a Factory Stock interior correctly done simply does require a lot of research, but the information is out there, someplace, somewhere. BTW, eBay is an excellent resource, and often it's very possible to email an eBay seller of a car one would like to model, to see if the seller is willing to take, and email more specific photo's.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 05, 2005 10:41 AM
agreed biscuitbuilder...

stock interiors do take a lot of research to do correctly as i also said reference pictures of what you're working on is a must...

i.e. some door panels have carpet on lower section others do not... some have chrome inserts and or emblems different to each different model...

if one is to do one like I will be doing to replicate a 1:1 I had from 84-86 a ultra rare 66 Pontiac Star Chief 2 dr Executive... I have to alter a 66 Boneville, or Catalina or 2+2, correcting wheel base overall length and interior differences...

I bow to you biscuitbuilder, I'm sure you have more experience and exertise in this area than I do... I have done very little exact stock to 1:1 replication.. but intend on a few being added to my collection...

Walt
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 05, 2005 10:48 AM
Walt,

Once I get my job situation settled, and know where I'm gonna be for a while, I'll dig into my references, as I have a '66 full-sized Pontiac brochure here (packed away now) that has a decent interior shot of the Executive, and gives the overall length and wheelbase of both sizes of full-sized Poncho's.

Biscuitbuilder
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 05, 2005 12:18 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by biscuitbuilder1

Walt,

Once I get my job situation settled, and know where I'm gonna be for a while, I'll dig into my references, as I have a '66 full-sized Pontiac brochure here (packed away now) that has a decent interior shot of the Executive, and gives the overall length and wheelbase of both sizes of full-sized Poncho's.

Biscuitbuilder


thankyou... defintely no hurry have to finish others in process first ... the most time consuming stock exact detailed one is my 77 Roadrunner to 76 Dodge Aspen R/T luckily I have access to the actual car nearby....

I used the interior from the revell Hemi Cuda SM to correct the upholstery and have adapted and altered the 71 Duster chassis for it... will be hand building the lower K member using a 76 CPD factory shop manual and the original MPC Chassis for basic reference..

Walt

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our privacy policy