Driver figures - Why the big size difference in the same scale?

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Driver figures - Why the big size difference in the same scale?

  • I have tried figures from Fujimi and Ulrich, and both manufacturers say they can be used in 1:24/25 models. The Fujimi figures are so much larger than Ulrich - I have only been able to use the smallest (female) figure in one of my projects - the male figures are just too big. I personally think that Fujimi only labelled their figures 1:24/25 so that they could sell to these larger markets, and that they're probably 1:20, which is another scale they support.


    Frank

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  • Since 1:1 people come in so many sizes (I have an aunt and uncle who are 4'11" and 6'6", respectively), I figure a little variety is a good thing.

  • This isn't a matter of just a couple of scale inches! It's the difference between G scale (1:20.3) and 1:24/25.

    Diecast sellers on eBay like to think that G scale and 1:24/25 are pretty much the same thing, and that's why they sell G scale items to use in 1:24/25 dioramas.  I bought a G scale seated figure by Bachmann, and there's no way it will fit into one of my cars!

    I'd like to have back all the dollars and time I wasted trying to find figures that would fit into my models!

    Frank

  • The two figures you mentioned up top were both 1:24/5, so I was sticking to that.  But I have also seen G scale figures that would work perfectly well within the 1:24/5 world - like I said, there's a lot of wiggle room when it comes to figures.  It seems highly dependent on the whims of the manufacturer.

    Regarding getting them in your cars: where does the conflict come in?  I know of several modelers who have had difficulty getting figures into their cars because they didn't relieve either the seats or the figure backs (to take into account the compression that happens to both when you sit).  Others have not adjusted the seats, lowered the floor (most kits have the equivalent of a 4" thick floor), or removed the glass bridge from the headliner.

  • spencer1984

    The two figures you mentioned up top were both 1:24/5, so I was sticking to that.  But I have also seen G scale figures that would work perfectly well within the 1:24/5 world - like I said, there's a lot of wiggle room when it comes to figures.  It seems highly dependent on the whims of the manufacturer.

    Just because Fujimi decided to "label" their kit 1:24/25, it's no reason to believe that they will actually work in that scale. "Whims of the manufacturer": This could instead be labelled "greed", because making a kit of figures for the 1:20th market, which is what these are, will certainly make the item more popular if they also say they can be used with 1:24/25, and by a simple marketing technique, they just expanded their market by leaps and bounds.

    spencer1984

    Regarding getting them in your cars: where does the conflict come in?  I know of several modelers who have had difficulty getting figures into their cars because they didn't relieve either the seats or the figure backs (to take into account the compression that happens to both when you sit).  Others have not adjusted the seats, lowered the floor (most kits have the equivalent of a 4" thick floor), or removed the glass bridge from the headliner.

    Well, I have some experience with figures, as you can certainly see. Of the 4 figures I built from the Fujimi kit, only the smallest (the female driver) was small enough to fit into a kit-in-progress. Since most kits don't provide doors that open, you just about have to build around your figures and get them into position before final assembly. The only figure I've built so far that was small enough to fit into just about any of my cars is the one by Ulrich. I would much prefer the manufacturer to include a driver figure in each kit, and it would be even better if the limbs were not rigid.

    Frank

  • Its not just the figures, Its just as much the car as well. The interiors of most of them are not to true scale to begin with. Some have floors that are too thick. Usually its the "tub" type thats the hardest.  I fought this as well and have been sucessful only when I have altered the figure and the interior for anything to fit. usually I have to remove the "tub" floor to give the interior some much needed depth for leg room. Sanding down the seat bottom and back along with the figures back and bottom to match them together helps. I also cut the legs and arms off the figures to reposition them.  But it would be really nice if someone offered a figure kit that worked better or even included a driver in the car kit. I suspect the fjimi drivers are made for fujimi car kits. Their figures are more 1/24th and most cars we build are 1/25th, so there is going to be a problem with fit.  

    If you can't find or afford to buy it, Build or make it yourself.

     

    On my bench: 57 Ford skyliner, 56 chevy gasser, 57 ford gasser, 2- 72 Novas , 69 nova, 54 chevy fieldcar, 61 Galaixe and a 40 willys gasser, 55 F100....along with  a handfull of stalled builds I need to finish. Basicaly too many.

  • Rotorbolt

    But it would be really nice if someone offered a figure kit that worked better or even included a driver in the car kit. I suspect the fjimi drivers are made for fujimi car kits. Their figures are more 1/24th and most cars we build are 1/25th, so there is going to be a problem with fit.  

    I suspect that Fujimi's figures are somewhere between 1:20 and 1:24, so that they can be labelled as being for both, since Fujimi also makes 1:20 car kits. Regardless, there have been some kits announced just recently, that include driver figures, and perhaps that will become the norm in the near future. I'm real tempted to try a 1:20 kit so I can get to see how the included driver figures work, and compare them to the 1:24/25 kit figures...

    Frank

  • Here are a few kits that include figures...

    MPC 1/25 1974 Plymouth Road Runner S.E. Tin w/Figure

    Revell 1/25 Royal '66 Pontiac GTO w/Figure

    Tamiya 1/20 McLaren MP4/5B w/Driver

    Revell 1/25 Challenger 1 w/Mickey Thompson Figure

    Frank

  • WinkYou gotta do some " body work " !!  Sorry, I couldn't resist

    If it's Too Loud, you're Too Old 

     

  • Yeah the Fujimi guys look like giants next to the old school figures.  Especially since they are made in japan where the people are usually smaller than Americans.  So it must be the case of 1/20 scale being mis-labeled as 1/24.  You can always make them fit by cutting arms and legs with a razor saw and repositioning them, sanding the butt and back down, but then you will have to repaint them and they will still be over scale.  

    I have an old 1965 MPC Corvette and it came with a race driver figure, unfortunately there was so much glue used to attach him to the seat that it was melted together, ruining the figure's legs and the seat.  

    Dave

    Working on rebuilding my 1/1 scale 1987 El Camino SS, as well as collecting models of anything Chevy powered. Along with my passion for WW1 aircraft I seldom get much finished.

  • DaveSS1987

    Yeah the Fujimi guys look like giants next to the old school figures.  Especially since they are made in japan where the people are usually smaller than Americans.  So it must be the case of 1/20 scale being mis-labeled as 1/24.  You can always make them fit by cutting arms and legs with a razor saw and repositioning them, sanding the butt and back down, but then you will have to repaint them and they will still be over scale.  

    I agree, Dave. The larger figure was originally a "mechanic" - I tried my best to get him into a good position to be used as a driver, but he was just too big. Sure, I suppose I could have done major surgery on him, but what the heck - his body would still be way out of scale!  Super Angry

    Frank