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Resin bodies and windshields

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  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Resin bodies and windshields
Posted by BigTallDad on Sunday, October 21, 2012 11:41 AM

Is it just me or are others having difficulty getting the donor glass to fit the resin body?

I'm now on my third different kit ('51 Chevy 2-dr sedan) and the fit is absolutely horrid; I've had to grind down the base of the windshield so the body tub (which also had to be sanded) would fit high enough, only to discover the wing vents had a gap as well as extending beyound the frame.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    July, 2005
Posted by Snake45 on Sunday, October 21, 2012 11:45 AM

I have several Jimmy Flintstone bodies that are so thick and rough on the inside that I wonder how I'm going to get glass into them. This is the main reason I've never got one of them built yet.

OTOH, I have several resin bodies that are such perfect copies of the kits they were made from that it's hard to tell them apart.

Recovering aircraft modeler. "I can see me bound and gagged

Dragged behind the clownmobile...."

--Warren Zevon, "Hostage-O," Life'll Kill Ya, Artemis Record 2000

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Monday, October 22, 2012 5:25 PM

Glad it's not just me. This one is an absolute nightmare...I basically had to butcher the donor windshield and scratch-build all the other glass. The '51 Chevy will end up as a six-foot model.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    August, 2005
Posted by ericmac on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 12:06 PM

Oh, it is not just you. I did a Checker Marathon a while back. While I eventually got the glass (which came with the resin kit) to fit "okay," it was never really right. Then I got the body glued down (another major headache) only to discover I left finger prints all over the inside of the glass. ARRRRUGH!

Why can't I stand to slap these things together like I did as a teenager? On the bench 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Victoria, 1932 Duesenberg J Judkins Coupe, 1934 Ford Cabriolet, 1926 Ford Model Ts-the complete set of all six bodystyles.

  • Member since
    August, 2004
Posted by TOPNOTCH on Monday, February 04, 2013 2:08 PM

BTD, all resin bodies are a nightmare to fit windows, the vacuum formed windows are usually to big. The other problem is usually the window pillars are to thick and need to be filed or ground out, that's when the pillars break and the body gets put on the side do to frustration. Try to find plastic windows from a donar kit or watch ebay for parts kits.

  • Member since
    October, 2011
Posted by vypurr59 on Tuesday, February 05, 2013 7:38 AM

I have found to use some lexan from Pat Catans craft store, I found this by the framing dept.  It is easy to cut, sand, it is clear, some have non glare coating as well.  Ranges from sizes 4x5 inches to 3 foot by 2 foot.  Also in several thicknesses from .008 to ,30.   hope this may also help you.   Also with a hair dryer can be heated and bent to conform to curves

Living by Chance,

Loving by Choice,

Member of North Coast Automotive Modelers

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Oak Creek, Wisconsin
Posted by fseva on Thursday, March 21, 2013 9:03 PM

vypurr59

I have found to use some lexan from Pat Catans craft store, I found this by the framing dept.  It is easy to cut, sand, it is clear, some have non glare coating as well.  Ranges from sizes 4x5 inches to 3 foot by 2 foot.  Also in several thicknesses from .008 to ,30.   hope this may also help you.   Also with a hair dryer can be heated and bent to conform to curves

I've never heard of Pat Catans craft store - is it similar to Michael's? I ask because I know we have a Michael's in the area, but maybe not the one you mentioned.

Frank

  • Member since
    January, 2012
Posted by shade on Monday, June 24, 2013 10:39 AM

All good ideas, but I have had the best luck with is the small bits of clear plastic that is used in the packaging of men's dress shirts. They are used to hold the color shape and behind the pin for the top button. Just a few shirts could last a life time. They will bend a lot with out getting any lines in them. Very good for windshields and rear and side glass.

  • Member since
    September, 2008
  • From: East Templeton Ma
Posted by streetrod on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 12:02 AM

Hi Guys,

If you go to your local hobby shops Evergreen sells clear styrene in packages just like the white pieces. They come in .015, .010 and .005 thicknesses and are perfect for windshields and "glass" for most cases. The .005 thick plastic will conform to all but the most compound curved applications.

Hope this helps,

Barry Fadden

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    June, 2013
  • From: ERIE PA
Posted by MR.ME on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 8:43 AM

with all the trouble you gents seem to have with resin bodies, are they really worth all the effort? I was thinking of ordering one am on a very thin budget which producers are the easiest to work with? I was looking at Jimmy Flintstone?  Thanks for any and all comments!!!

  • Member since
    November, 2006
  • From: Miamisburg, Oh.
Posted by willieman on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 11:09 AM

Check out Snake 45's comment on Jimmy Flintsone...Does'nt sound too positive.......................

Wiliie

Ya gotta stand for something or you'll fall for anything...........

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Kannsas City
Posted by 93slammer on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 12:59 PM

MR.ME

with all the trouble you gents seem to have with resin bodies, are they really worth all the effort? I was thinking of ordering one am on a very thin budget which producers are the easiest to work with? I was looking at Jimmy Flintstone?  Thanks for any and all comments!!!

I have a couple of Jimmy Flintsones bodies and they are just like Snake described. Plus one of mine has a boat load of pin holes. If this is your firts time buying a resin body don't get a Jimmy Flintstone.

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Wednesday, June 26, 2013 10:26 AM

MR.ME

with all the trouble you gents seem to have with resin bodies, are they really worth all the effort? I was thinking of ordering one am on a very thin budget which producers are the easiest to work with? I was looking at Jimmy Flintstone?  Thanks for any and all comments!!!

As you probably have noticed, I primarily build Factory Stock; I also enjoy building models of 1:1 cars I've owned in the past, most of which have not been "mainstream" (top of the line) cars.

Since the model companies usually offer high end models, I've had to go the resin route to get the bodies I needed ('51 Chevy 2dr sedan, '53 Ford 2dr sedan).

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Gresham,Oregon
Posted by 62pyro on Sunday, September 01, 2013 2:47 PM

I would stay away from Jimmie Flintstone if it's your first time.Outsides usually look good but the insides are thick and uneven.

I have a Modelhaus body ('57 Ford F100 cab) that looks like a regular plastic model.I know where I'll be looking when doing my next time (have to get this one done first) I want to do a resin kit.

Old school when it was still new. Team * Team S*A*B

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Adelaide, South Australia
Posted by 70CudaTJ on Tuesday, September 03, 2013 8:10 PM

I have only the one experiance with JF bodies, the 50 Ford pick up cab, and yes it's pretty thick, very few bubbles and great exterior details, but it's not my first resin kit.

I think you have to be an experienced modeller to attempt resin bodies no matter the manufacturer. Patience and a steady hand will get you through the resin side, as for windscreens, clear sheet can be worked and shaped (yes I've done it, see my '62 Valiant post in Muscle cars) just make templates and have several test runs at it first.

A motor tool like a Dremel will help heaps to thin down the body where you need the glass to go, saves lots of sanding and putting pressure on delicate pillars etc.

Slow progress is better than no progress!

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Thursday, September 05, 2013 6:48 PM

Did I miss something? The original question dealt with fit of donor kit windshields with resin kits, How did this get so far astray, up to the point of MR.ME asking for feedback?

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    June, 2010
Posted by eshaver on Monday, September 09, 2013 12:23 PM

Actually, I finally got hold of one of those bodies that defies anything mating to it . I got a 36 Ford Slantback. I'm told it's a Jimmy Flintstone body. The glass will not come anywhere close to fitting . I've even cut flat acetate trying to come up with a "HALFWAY" fitting windshield , no dice !  Ed Shaver

See ya on the road folks

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
Posted by zenrat on Friday, September 13, 2013 6:59 AM

MR.ME you should look at The Modelhaus.

It's the 21st Century. Where's my Jet Pack & Flying Car? On the bench - detritus mainly.

Ninjas don't have pockets.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, September 28, 2013 10:30 PM

Got quite a few resin bodies and kits, and have built some. Even though there was a lot of work to clean things up and sometimes re-make some parts, the prices were pretty nice for something to start with. I have even vacuum formed my own windshields.

Didn't have anything like these in resin when I first started modeling, so pretty nice.

To me it's kinda like buying a builder on eBay, takin' it all apart, and re-building it to something really nice. Lot of work, but in the end, worth it.

My My 2 Cents.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2011
  • From: East Wenatchee, Washington 98802
Posted by bonehead23 on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 6:36 PM

I'm doing a Flintstone '49 Merc, and it came with just the body. Since it is chopped, I cannot use kit glass. I had to engrave a channel around the inside of the front and rear windows with my Dremel and a small round bit, followed by a square one to define the "edge" and then cut clear styrene to fit in the channel. This may not work for more curved windows, but on the Merc they were fairly flat, so it worked fine. On my '59 Chevy delivery, i tried to use kit glass, but the windshield fit was very poor. The one included with the body was just as bad. Even after a lot of trimming and carving...unless you look very closely it is hard to see...but I know it isn't perfect. Resin bodies are just that way! If you thrive on a challenge, resin is the way to go.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Louisville, CO
Posted by maniacalmodeler on Thursday, June 12, 2014 10:49 AM

I have in the past made a plastic frame that fits inside the resin body, and then made a windshield to fit in the plastic frame. I use Tamiya 40mm tape over the windshield area and trace the pattern onto the tape and then transfer the tape to clear acetate, then using some scissors cut out the pattern and then sand to fit. Then glue the "glass" into place. I hope this helps.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: WA. State/B.C. Canada
Posted by B.C> Model Guy on Thursday, January 08, 2015 1:20 PM

This one of the more interesting threads for sure. I am forever grateful for the resin community and what they provide because most of these guys are the only show in town for a lot of kits. bodies and parts. I am one who likes a challenge and I go as far as I can and when things hit a wall, I set it aside and move on, hoping to develop my skills to where I can come back to that shelved project, pick up the pieces and beat that rascal into submission. I've got a few of Jimmy Flintstones kits and while they may have their issues at times, I guess that the deciding factor on whether you finish the build or stop depends on how badly you want the finished product on your shelf.

I think that we are our own worst enemies sometimes because we will take on something that is beyond our skill level, find some challenges and then blame the caster. In all fairness, I have bought resin stuff that was not even build-able, warped, totally inaccurate and just junk. So, we should do our homework on who we are buying from. But going back to being our own worst enemies - we all try to do our best on a build and I am as guilty as anyone of always pushing the envelope and forming unrealistic goals by expecting myself and trying to get too detailed. Sometimes, a mediocre build has to suffice because as Will Darnell in the movie Christine said - "Ya know pepper, ya can't polish a t_rd". Some things are just too far gone or too wrong to ever hope to create something accurate and nice from. Sometimes when you "hit the wall" with a build, it is wise to set it aside and work on something more simple and something that you really like.

As for glass, as stated, the clear plastic in some packaging works very well as does the clear sheet acetate. Actually, sometimes even on a styrene kit, the thinner acetate looks better and works better - especially for side glass and softer curves in windshields and rear glass such as on station wagons and sedan deliveries. Hope this helps someone..

I hate thinking about the past. It brings back so many memories......
  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Friday, February 27, 2015 5:59 PM

Well, I tried to stay out of this one till I read the last post.  Most of us would think a JF product would at least be a quality product, its sold at major hobby outlets for gosh sakes.  

The fact is, I didn't have the skill level needed to build my XLR last year, so I've been slowly refining my skills and working on the engine.  The body is rough on the outside and even rougher on the inside.  It did come with vf glass but it looks like it will be a tough fit.  

Yes it takes an experienced modeler to work a resin kit, but one should at least expect a quality product bought from a major vendor.  I'm determined to make mine work, because that's who we are, but I don't blame myself for buying the thing.  And non one else should.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Southeastern Virginia, USA
Posted by rustyroach on Wednesday, March 25, 2015 5:18 AM
I just love it when these things turn philosophical. After almost two and a half years, I hope BTD got it figured out for himself. Philosophically speaking, Will Darnell was wrong, wasn't he?

Rust Never Sleeps

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Thursday, March 26, 2015 5:09 PM

rustyroach
I just love it when these things turn philosophical. After almost two and a half years, I hope BTD got it figured out for himself. Philosophically speaking, Will Darnell was wrong, wasn't he?

Yep, I got it figured out. By gently rapping with a nine pound sledgehammer, I was able to get everything to fit in a business-size envelope.

Thanks to all for the philosophical advice as well as the attempted thread hijacking.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

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