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Interior weathering

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  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Southern Ohio
Interior weathering
Posted by D.R.T. on Sunday, February 17, 2008 5:41 PM
How do you replicate torn seats and other worn interior parts?
Down -n- Dirty (Davis Racing Technology) My Bench is Covered!!! http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll318/d-r-t-72/Models/?action=view&current=DSCN0126.jpg
  • Member since
    August, 2005
Posted by sjordan on Sunday, February 17, 2008 7:40 PM
Do a search on this site. There was a great thread on torn seats with stuffing coming out, I think regarding a1:43 WWII Citroen. As for worn seats, I think when it comes to doing any kinds of interior leather or vinyl that you can't beat artist's acrylics like Liquitex, available at any art or hobby store. There are acrylic gels for these paints that allow you to create wrinkles in fabric and leather and you have ultimate flexibility for the kind of finish you want, with dull or gloss. Because it's water-soluble, you can screw around with it as long as you like. The seats on my 1/12 Bentley are still just right after I used that technique in 1972.
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Sunday, February 17, 2008 8:03 PM
Gosh, I get ostracized for suggesting that folks do a search.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    October, 2005
  • From: Nosebleed seats, NY
Posted by VW Dave on Monday, February 18, 2008 6:59 AM
D.R.T. - I hope I can help shed a little light on the subject.

I did a quickie weather job on an AMT '50 Chevy truck seat, to make a very unique 'best interior' trophy for a local charity car show. The torn part of the seat is visible among the spilled french fries:


To make the 'tear,' I went at the underside of the desired spot with a ball-shaped milling bit in my Dremel until it was almost transparent; I figure the thinned area was about 1/18" in diameter. I cut the torn 'pattern' from the top with a fresh #11 X-Acto blade, and then gently pushed the pints upward from underneath with a toothpick. A little Kleenex dipped in my brush cleaner jar was secured from underneath with 5-minute epoxy. I had done this on one of my own models previously, and I added a small coil of Detail Master spark plug wire to reresent a rogue spring sticking out of the hole as well, but I omitted it on the trophy because it would have been less visible once the clear dome was assembled.

The seat itself was painted with Krylon 'Make It Suede' textured paint and 'stained' with chalk pastels before being sealed with Testors DullCote. The duct tape is really electrical tape, cut into strips and painted with Testors steel enamel.
QUOTE: Originally posted by scottw I think one of the biggest problems is iltierate people... I pray to someday be the person my dog thinks I am
  • Member since
    November, 2006
  • From: Quebec, Canada
Posted by skumole on Monday, February 18, 2008 2:04 PM
Dave, how did you made the tiny model boxes? They look great Big Smile
_____________________________________________________________________________
  • Member since
    July, 2007
  • From: Lawrenceville, Georgia
Posted by kevinm on Monday, February 18, 2008 3:32 PM
Yeah, I'm wondering the same thing! I would think you cut small pieces of posterboard, print out model car box pictures, and use white glue to get it on. Did you scan all sides of the box?? -kevin
On The Bench: Ferrari 575 SuperAmerica Photobucket: http://s211.photobucket.com/albums/bb56/kevinm_010/
  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Southern Ohio
Posted by D.R.T. on Monday, February 18, 2008 3:59 PM
Dave thanks for the tip looks like something i'll have to try.
Down -n- Dirty (Davis Racing Technology) My Bench is Covered!!! http://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll318/d-r-t-72/Models/?action=view&current=DSCN0126.jpg
  • Member since
    August, 2005
Posted by sjordan on Monday, February 18, 2008 7:39 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by BigTallDad

Gosh, I get ostracized for suggesting that folks do a search.


It's like jokes. It's how you tell 'em. :)
  • Member since
    October, 2005
  • From: Nosebleed seats, NY
Posted by VW Dave on Monday, February 18, 2008 10:57 PM
Thanks for the kudos, you guys.

I use the 'old school' photoreduction technique for my model boxes, which I recall reading in an issue of SA about 15 years ago. I put my trusty 35mm PHD('Push Here Dummy') camera on a tripod, and I pin flattened boxes to my garage door with push pins. At varying distances between 12-15ft. away, I take a few pics and get the film developed. Cut the little boxes out and fold them with tweezers or smooth-jawed needlenose pliers, and glue them together with CA.

It's become kind of a 'trademark' of my builds to have the original kit box somewhere inside the car:
QUOTE: Originally posted by scottw I think one of the biggest problems is iltierate people... I pray to someday be the person my dog thinks I am
  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posted by peanutgallery on Monday, February 18, 2008 11:05 PM
Dave....thanks for the great info....also, if you access to 1:1 automotive pinstriping tape...any Silver 1/16" wide tape makes great duct tape.

Dennis

 

  • Member since
    April, 2007
  • From: Fort Mill, SC
Posted by johnbuzzed on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 8:34 AM
I've used silver decal material to simulate duct tape with good results. Also, I've used non-smoked cigarette filter material for seat stuffing/foam- it looks pretty good. Don't forget some assorted stains and dirt on the floor and ground-in dirt on the worn pedal pads, too. Floquil and Polly-S make some good weathering colors- they actually have "Dirt" and "Grimy Black", even "Oily Black" and "Dust".

"You live, you learn".

John "The Buzzard" Buzzerio

  • Member since
    May, 2006
Posted by dsully66 on Sunday, February 24, 2008 5:04 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by VW Dave

Thanks for the kudos, you guys.

I use the 'old school' photoreduction technique for my model boxes, which I recall reading in an issue of SA about 15 years ago. I put my trusty 35mm PHD('Push Here Dummy') camera on a tripod, and I pin flattened boxes to my garage door with push pins. At varying distances between 12-15ft. away, I take a few pics and get the film developed. Cut the little boxes out and fold them with tweezers or smooth-jawed needlenose pliers, and glue them together with CA.

It's become kind of a 'trademark' of my builds to have the original kit box somewhere inside the car:



I bought many moons ago a photoreduced sheet manufactured by detail master or one of these aftermarket guys that had a couple of kit boxes and SAE magazines on it. I don't know if they're still available though. I'll have to try your method VW Dave. Thanks for showing the wonderful jobs!
Dan
  • Member since
    February, 2004
  • From: Williams Lake, BC
Posted by Robert81 on Monday, February 25, 2008 9:15 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by VW Dave

Thanks for the kudos, you guys.

I use the 'old school' photoreduction technique for my model boxes, which I recall reading in an issue of SA about 15 years ago. I put my trusty 35mm PHD('Push Here Dummy') camera on a tripod, and I pin flattened boxes to my garage door with push pins. At varying distances between 12-15ft. away, I take a few pics and get the film developed.



I remember that tip, but it was for Licence plates. They did a series on photographing models, too. God, I wish I could find that box of old magazines.
Robert Taphorn It doesn't matter how good you are, just that you have fun.
  • Member since
    October, 2005
  • From: Nosebleed seats, NY
Posted by VW Dave on Monday, February 25, 2008 9:27 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Robert81
[I remember that tip, but it was for Licence plates.


I also use that method for plates when I'm doing a replica build, and it works great IMO:
QUOTE: Originally posted by scottw I think one of the biggest problems is iltierate people... I pray to someday be the person my dog thinks I am
  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • From: Great White North
Posted by plymouth71 on Thursday, May 08, 2008 3:33 PM

not quite finished, still have to darken the white patches on the seats.  The trick here is to use bare metal foil burnished onto the seat and then carefully cut and pull up.  then use small slices of foam and tuck them under and push the foil back.   I used some old foam from carpet underlay.

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by the doog on Monday, May 19, 2008 10:52 PM

 ON my Nomad junker, I used lead foil super-glued to the seat, and sealed the edges with super glue, then filed them smooth to hide the seam. Then, I cut the lead foil and bent it up, and I then scraped out the interior "hole" with a sharp exacto blade, and using some thinned Squadron putty, stippled some into the hole to simulate stuffing.

Paint it up and here's what you have... by the way, the finished model of this car is in the "Diorama's" section of the forums here, in a post called "The Lair of the Rust Bunnies" if you're interested?


 

If you like my work, check out my Fotki model gallery here: The Doog's Models

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Chandler, AZ
Posted by del austin on Tuesday, June 03, 2008 4:50 PM

Another way to replicate magazines, kit boxes, license plates, etc. without the quess work of how far away to shoot the pictures is to use a digital camera and some good photo editing software so that you have 100% control over the final size of the finished product.

  • Member since
    October, 2005
  • From: Nosebleed seats, NY
Posted by VW Dave on Sunday, June 08, 2008 12:20 AM

del austin
Another way to replicate magazines, kit boxes, license plates, etc. without the quess work of how far away to shoot the pictures is to use a digital camera and some good photo editing software so that you have 100% control over the final size of the finished product.

I'm guessing that you've aimed the above comment at my previously-mentioned method, and I feel I need to address your concerns: I vary the photo distance so that my photoreduced items can be used with either 1/24th or 1/25th-scale models.....after doing it this way for a couple of decades now, I'd hardly call it 'guesswork.' Black Eye

With the difference between manufacturers' scales, it helps to have a stash of assorted sizes anyway.

QUOTE: Originally posted by scottw I think one of the biggest problems is iltierate people... I pray to someday be the person my dog thinks I am
  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by EvanDizasterous on Sunday, January 08, 2017 3:37 PM
Bringing it back from the dead... @VWDave, how did you do the crochet blanket drapped over the back rest of the truck seat? I'm looking for a finishing touch for my rotted out street rod and I think that'd be perfect.
  • Member since
    March, 2004
  • From: Lancashire, UK
Posted by marcusadam on Sunday, January 08, 2017 11:42 PM
http://www.scaleautomag.com/how-to-models/tips-tech/2005/02/blanket-decals

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