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Laquer VS Enamel...

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  • Member since
    August 2008
  • From: kingsport,tn.
Laquer VS Enamel...
Posted by 01jeepxj on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 6:15 PM

Confused  I admit I'm not a paint genius. What's the difference in Laquer & Enamel? I have used enamel only, Testors/MM & automotive with automotive thinner. I'm going to try Donn Yost's technique with the laquer thinner & enamel, soon as I can get to "town".

BUT, what's the diff in laquer & enamel? The thinner used? If not, what?

What is a pro & con of each? Why/where would you use one over the other? Maybe it's me but automotive shoots better for me than Testors.

Never try to teach a pig to sing. It's a waste of time and it only annoys the pig.

  • Member since
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Posted by 50mercfan on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 6:30 PM

from what i been reading about  laquer VS enamel.laquer is the way to go it's hotter and it drys much faster and its easy to paint then Enamel. most of the guys here use Laquer.
i will be useing Laquer also and testors Enamel  spary is not good there new laquer is awesome

  • Member since
    August 2009
Posted by Ragnar on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 8:05 PM

Lacquer dries faster than strait enamel does and has a slightly harder finish. The hotter Lacquers like those made for automotive painting will attack plastic. The Lacquers made for use on models is safe to use. The reason that many people say that lacquer is easier to use is its faster drying time mean less chance for the paint to run, this same faster drying time can cause you to get orange peal if you hold the Airbrush/Can to far from the surface you sre painting.

Mixing two parts enamel paint to one part mild Lacquer thinner gives you the best of both paint types.

Donn gives a good discription of how to get a great paint job using enamel thinned with mild(cheap) lacquer thinner on his DVD!

Hope I was able to help!

CHEERS!

CHEERS!

Tom

 Old Hot Rodders are Like Old Hot Rods, We may not be as Fast as The New Guys, But We Got There First!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Okatie S.C.
Posted by fiddlercrab on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 9:05 PM

I have used Donn's method  of two parts enamel & one part cheap wally world lacquers on my 41 Willy with no clear coat & I used Dupli -color on the same model first & cleared it with future floor wax hoping the orange peel would magically disappear. The only way that it would disappear was to dump it into brake fluid, & shoot it again with Donn's paint formula.

 

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by Lonewolf15 on Tuesday, May 11, 2010 11:44 PM

C'mon . Jeep !

           It's time ! You've been flirtin' with this for months ! I guarantee you'll love the results , Gary's pictures tell the tale . All of the old wives tales are laid to rest using this formula . The diffrence ,,,,, You are starting off with a shine to your paint with the enamel , the cheap laquer thinner causes it to dry hard , quick and tight , with no loss of detail . Using Testors enamels , you don't have to worry if it's going to attack your model body because that is exactly what it's meant for .

            Laquers were designed for the auto industry , metal , not plastic . Please don't get me wrong . I love them . I used Floquil for decades with the model trains . However , when it comes to the model cars , why complicate the situation ? This laquer works with this primer , but..... it does'nt work with this brand of paint . This brand of paint works with this brand of clear , but , not the other brand and so on and so forth ! Sound familiar ? Way too much confusion if you ask me !

              I have stated this here and on other forums before ,  you want to start out with something that is going to give you good results coming right out of the gate . That would be enamels ! Once you've got your techniques down to a science , then you can go off and experiment with other medias. You need to have a firm foundation to start with .

        No one likes to be frustrated and stagger around blindly while trying to learn something new without some form of guidance or system in place . Otherwise , it's kinda like skipping through a minefield without the map in your back pocket to lead you along the way . One false step , one mistake , and BOOM ! Back to the drawing board ........ Again !

           Needless to say , that gets expensive and tiresome , real quick !  All anybody has to do is look at Gary's work , which by the way is fantastic , the pictures don't lie ! He is producing superior show quality finishes with a product that most modelers turn their nose up at ! And for what reason ? Old wives tales , taboos , and a simple lack of knowledge when it comes to using the product would be my guess ! Want to know the amazing part ? Gary just started airbrushing model cars a short time ago ! The black Willys in the picture was his first attempt with Duplicolor . He threw it in the stripper and started over again . The red body was his first enamel paint job with an airbrush !

           Enamels are cheaper , user friendly to your model body , and about 1/10 of the work when compared to laquers . You start off with a gloss , add clear to it and you've simply enriched the depth and shine of your color . It's a consistent win -  win situation for all involved . One other myth that I want to dispel...... Testors  enamel clear top coat does not yellow , crack or glaze with time . The only color that it will " ivory " out on would be white ! 

            This is just my opinion , I'm not looking for a battle  with anyone over this age old war nor will I engage in one . All I have to say , look at the pictures and the results , they don't lie ! 

                                  Gary , Beautiful work !  , my friend , Simply beautiful !

                                                                Donn Yost

                                                    Lone Wolf Custom Painting

 

      

 

 

            

          

             

 

              

 

 

Contact me at .... oldmansmodels.com
  • Member since
    August 2008
  • From: kingsport,tn.
Posted by 01jeepxj on Wednesday, May 12, 2010 12:17 AM

Yeah Donn, I know. As I said, when I get the chance to get to Lowes or whatever, I'm going to get a can of laquer thinner & do this deal. I have a body that I use for different experiments so that'll get a new paint job.  

I was curious about laquer paint. The old Car Craft/HotRod mags talk about X # coats of hand rubbed laquer etc.I know where you're coming from with the enamel/lt paint. I WILL try it - a guy like you can't be wrong!!!  Laugh

Never try to teach a pig to sing. It's a waste of time and it only annoys the pig.

  • Member since
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  • From: Frisco, TX
Posted by shucky on Friday, May 14, 2010 1:55 PM
I'm not trying to fuel the age old fire, but everyone has an opinion and preference which may or may not be suitable for everyone's application, talent, or skills. Lacquer paint does not require "so much work" IMO. It dries hard, extremely easy to spray, and looks fantastic (IE- "show quality"). Its not confusing either. If you use rattle can automotive primer (my choice is Dupli-Color) you can spray anything over it (Enamel or Lacquer). Whats confusing about that? Furthermore, you can achieve "show quality" results w/out an airbrush, w/out mixing paints and solvents, w/out spending money on extra equipment (air brush, paints, solvents, compressor, etc, etc, etc). Lacquer paint does not run, it dries fast, easy to sand, polish, spray, etc. I have never had Dupli Color primer or paint EVER attack plastic. Perhaps the example paint job turned out better after the re-spray because he had instructions on exactly what to do from the DVD. Perhaps if he had some guidelines on how to spray simple automotive paint the results would be great as well. Not really a fair comparison. Lots and lots of folks use automotive paint w/out any issues whatsoever. If you do not like rubbing lacquer gloss out, use Testors 1 shot. Or use Testors 1 shot and give it a few rubbing's of Scratch X. The paint will be smooth as glass and easy to boot. And by the way, Testors enamel clear does indeed "yellow" over time on lighter shades of paint. I have almost 30 years worth of proof. Again, not fueling any fire, just stating lacquer auto paint on models is not the "devil," its easy to do, and easy to achieve great results. Good luck !
  • Member since
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Posted by pedal2dametal on Friday, May 14, 2010 2:48 PM
As ‘enaquer’ paint (enamel + lacquer), the best of both worlds, has yet to be invented, everyone is entitled to an opinion about lacquer vs. enamel. But the only ‘argument’ as to which is better is with yourself. To wit, try Donn’s method of painting a model with enamels. Then compare the results with your most recent lacquer painted model or vice-versa.  Draw your own opinions and conclusions: It’s your choice/preference how to paint a model and no one else’s. 
  • Member since
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Posted by phill on Monday, May 17, 2010 7:08 PM
I have seen Donn's work in show and he absolutely knows what he is talking about. The thing about lacquer is yes you can spray it right out of the can and it is hard to make it run but, and this is a big but, it takes forever to polish. If you polish it quick, you end up rubbing through the edges, and if you polish it slow, it takes forever. And there might be places on the model, such as air intakes of exotic sports cars, that are impossible to polish. This is especially true with automotive lacquer - they are hard as granite and you will never be able to get the edges glossy without accidentally rubbing through. With hobby lacquer such as Tamiya, you have a much easier time but you still need to put in the work because Tamiya lacquer tends to dry to a matt finish, and again you risk rubbing through places along the edges. So for that little time you save spraying lacquer out of a can, you spend 10x the time polishing the paint and the beginners always mess it up so it's back to striping and painting and stripping and painting. The thing about enamel is that they dry to a gloss, so you only need to polish the big flat surfaces where orange peels are apparent. In fact, with some MM color, you hardly get any orange peel - but you do need to be careful to strike that delicate balance between spraying enough for the paint to level out and too much which causes the paint to run. Now with that said, I must say that I am experimenting with Testors' new One Coat Clear Lacquer and I am so far impressed. It sprays right out of the can like lacquer, meaning it sprays light and easy, but acts like enamel meaning it levels out and dry without the typical lacquer texture. And it also pools along the edges like enamel just a little. And what is most surprising is that it does not really smell all that bad, unlike Tamiya and Testors' Auto Lacquer. I am very suspicious that it is actually enamel in disguise. Maybe it is actually Donn Yost's formula?!??
  • Member since
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Posted by 50mercfan on Tuesday, May 18, 2010 5:08 PM

I saw the Testors' new One Coat  Lacquer  paint at the LHS but the store did not have a lot of colors
only a few candy colors. does this one coat work better then the other stuff testors makes
sombody explain this to me thanks

  • Member since
    May 2010
Posted by phill on Tuesday, May 18, 2010 5:59 PM

Yes the One Coat Lacquer is probably the best spray paint Testors makes. It is better than their spray enamels because lacquer is a light paint and enamel is a heavy paint. Testors make crappy spray nozzles. Therefore their spray enamels are a hit or miss affair. You can have one can that sprays beautifully and the next can the paint hardly atomizes. The One Coat is also better than their Auto Lacquer line because their Auto Lacquer line is really modeled after the Tamiya spray lacquers, but not quite as good. So if you want to get the Auto Lacquer paints you might as well get Tamiya.

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Pasadena, CA
Posted by Ddms on Wednesday, May 19, 2010 7:57 PM

 Tamiya TS lacquer is great paint. Unlike old-style lacquers, it gives excellent coverage, so it's not necessary to spray multiple coats or heavy coats. If you warm the can and hold it close while you spray, you get little or no orange peel - and a nice gloss, right out of the can.

Urethanes and old-style lacquers produce a textured finish and always need color sanding, but with Tamiya TS (a synthetic lacquer), a little polishing will often produce a great gloss. You don't need elaborate polishing kits with 24 levels of abrasions. A good compound will do the job. So the risk of burn-thru is minimal.

As with all lacquers, it dries fast, so dust isn't a big problem. Clear coating is strictly optional; some of the Tamiya colors are amazingly glossy and deep.

Phill is right; the nozzles are excellent - the next best thing to an airbrush. 

Although I usually use automotive urethanes because of the color selection, and I use U-POL clear coat instead of TS13, I still think Tamiya TS paints are the easiest paints to use to get excellent results. That's why they're the best selling paints in hobby shops that sell to aircraft and military modelers.  

But, in all honesty, I have not compared them straight across with enamels.

BTW, I have no connection with Tamiya. Zip, zero. I just like the paint.

DDMS

  • Member since
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  • From: East Templeton Ma
Posted by streetrod on Thursday, May 20, 2010 8:26 PM

Hi Guys,

I've been building and painting models for over 50 years and have to both agree and disagree with some of the comments made in this thread. I really think there are good and bad points to enamel and lacquer paint.

I have over the last few years had three "best paint" awards given to my cars at various shows on the East Coast and all three were painted with Testors spray can enamel. I have just recently (last couple of years) started using Tamiya and Testors Model Master lacquers and have had good success with both of these as well. I really feel both have their good and bad points and it's actually a personal preference.

I have seen Donn's paint jobs at NNL East and have to say his method does really work. However, I have to disagree with Donn and agree with Shucky that the Testors enamel Clears will Yellow over time. I have a Silver and Black '34 Ford Sedan and a Light Blue '29 Ford Roadster Cleared with Testors enamel clear years ago. The '34 is now Champaigne and Black and the'29 is a "yucky Brownish" color I can't really describe. All except the hood on the '29 that I, for some reason, painted the Light Blue but didn't Clearcoat. It's still, after all these years, nice and bright. Just my experience.

I also have to agree that the Testors WHITE nozzles are "junk" for painting bodies. Buy a couple of cans of their flat or military flat paint and use the BLACK nozzles for painting bodies and body parts. When your done drop them into a jar or bottle of enamel or lacquer thinner (depending on which paint you are using) until your next use. I do keep my enamel and lacquer nozzles separate. I use the WHITE nozzles for interiors and chassis.

Some of you may have seen my '32 Ford Victoria I postrd a couple of weeks ago in the Hot Rods Customs and Street Machine section of this forum. That car was Cleared with the Testors lacquer system Clear and I had no trouble polishing it to a great shine after only a few days drying time using my polishing kit.

These are again just some of my thoughts and comments based on my many, many, many (I think I'm going to cry) years of experience. Hope I haven't bored you all.

Barry Fadden

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    January 2009
Posted by Lonewolf15 on Thursday, May 20, 2010 9:46 PM

Barry,

           I should have stated this diffrently to avoid confusion ... Testors clear has never yellowed on my models that were shot with the airbrush having been mixed with the cheap laquer thinner . I should have clarified this before . Quite a few of the built cars that you saw at the NNL East were painted 7 plus years ago and cleared with the 2 to 1 ratio . No yellowing what so ever .

           I believe tha diffrence lies with the laquer thinner being just warm enough to allow the clear to " cut " into the painted surface and actually become part of the paint rather than lie on top of the  finished surface as it would if it were being sprayed out of a can if one were using the enamel clear coat. On a diffrent note , I never clear over top of the standard colors , I only use it on my pearls and metallics .

            In my opinion ,  for overall quality finishes , the airbrush is the only way to fly . Any individual that can use a spray can most certainly can use an airbrush , you have so much more control as compared to a spray can when it comes to being able to lay down steady , even ,  mist coats.

                                                       Donn Yost

                                            Lone Wolf Custom Painting

Contact me at .... oldmansmodels.com
  • Member since
    May 2010
Posted by phill on Friday, May 21, 2010 12:41 AM

I agree that yes you can get great result from Model Master spray enamels. But that is a hit or miss affair, depending on the color and the nozzle. In fact, I used to save the nozzle of a MM spray can when I chanced upon a particularly good one. I only used the white nozzles, however, as I never can spray flats - I always used an airbrush.

MM gloss color enamels are great for airbrushing. They level out beautifully, much better than the clear.

  • Member since
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  • From: Atlanta GA
Posted by Zoom Zoom on Friday, May 21, 2010 5:34 AM

I have several examples of models clearcoated with Testors Model Master clear enamel cut with lacquer thinner that most definitely yellowed over time. If it did not yellow over time, I'd probably still use it on many of my models. Nowadays I only use it on a very small % of my models, mostly due to the fact that I have a color best matched by enamel paint.

I've witnessed bottles of it that were almost clear when purchased turn much darker yellow over time before the paint was ever used. 

These Testors clear colors are more like a varnish, and varnish yellows over time with age.

Yes, it flows nicely through and airbrush when properly thinned and buffs out with ease, but I will never use Testors clear enamel on any color that will "shift" when the clearcoat yellows (any color in the yellow-orange-red range is fine, do not spray it over any "cool" color like white, silver, or blue; I have a '58 Bonneville painted with a very light lavender color on the roof and side spear that is now gray because of the yellowing...the seat inserts were not cleared, and remain the proper color).

Zoom Zoom, aka Bob Downie My Fotki Album The only cure for modeler's ADD is "final assembly and decal placement"
  • Member since
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  • From: Frisco, TX
Posted by shucky on Friday, May 21, 2010 8:37 AM
IMO, many folks make polishing a model much more intense and more work then it needs to be. Again, I do not agree that lacquer paint requires hours and hours of work to achieve a "glossy" finish. Thats just rubbish. Rubbing through on detail area's while polishing? Rubbish as well. Unless your trying to salvage a paint job gone wrong, which in most cases is easier to strip and start over than fix, there isn't much need for 10+ step polishing systems. Although they do work great on polishing windshields, etc. On my dupli color paint jobs, a few coats of dupli color clear are more than enough to protect the color coats. I then use a very mild rubbing compound, followed by some scratch X. Taking my time, including breaks, etc I can do a body and hood in less than 2 hours. Thats not bad considering the paint looks like glass afterwards. No burn through, no fuss. Even easier you say? Spray testors one coat clear ONLY no DC clear, and rub out with scratch X only. 2-4 rubb'ings and again, you have a crystal clear glass like finish. How complicated is that? No yellowing, no addt'l equipment, no sand paper, no polishing kit, no burn through. Let me remind that we are forgetting an important part of the painting process (at least for me). Primer! In my experience, primer needs to be smooth and trouble/issue free BEFORE laying any color coats. Lots of times guys try to still spray over un-smooth primer or primer that is still requiring minor body work hoping to hide the issues with more paint. Then they come here complaining about how their certain brand/type of paint ruined their model. This method does not work. Get your primer sorted before laying down paint and clear. I also dont mean to come across abrasive or like a know it all, but like many of you .. through trial and error you find what works and what doesn't. This doesn't mean my way of doing things will work 100% of the time, but just sharing my experience. I'm passionate about this particular subject because for many years I was someone who thought the only way to achieve a beautiful paint job was to use particular products and use an expensive and complicated polishing system. After many hours, repaints, touch ups, etc perhaps then I may have had a decent paint job. After experimenting and visiting sites like this I found out otherwise that none of this is necessary. Anyways, sorry this is long. Good luck guys, just remember to not overly complicate the hobby you otherwise enjoy! Mike
  • Member since
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Posted by phill on Friday, May 21, 2010 12:39 PM

As I mentioned one of the advantages of enamel is that it dries from the outside in, it skins over and you start out with a gloss, so that you don't need to polish it in places where polishing is impossible. Polishing might be a straight forward task when you do a 70s hot rod, but look at a modern Lamborghini with all the shape angels and ducts and air intakes, the story would be different. Lacquer dries from the inside out, and when it dries it shrinks and when it shrinks it gets pebbly. That is a fact. That is physics. The only lacquer that dries without getting pebbly is urethane, because it doesn't really dry, it hardens, and thus does not shrink. So as I mentioned if there is a paint that would allow you to polish less, that is a big plus, regardless of how easy it might be to polish a paint job.

  • Member since
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Posted by pedal2dametal on Friday, May 21, 2010 1:17 PM

I do not have a completed kit over a year old that has been airbrushed with Boyd Clear High Gloss enamel, thus my input, based on long-term results, is nil. However, the enamel was ‘yellow’ in the bottle when I purchased it. How many years was it sitting on the owner’s shelf?

There are several, more widely available clear and high gloss enamels manufactured by VHT, Valspar and Rust-Oleum, etc. Rust-Oleum even makes a point in the following blurb that its clear is made with a ‘non-yellowing’ formula. This begs the question: Is ‘yellowing’ of clear enamels ‘the nature of the beast?’

http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=166

I wonder if anyone has tried these products in lieu of Boyd’s clear high-gloss enamel.

  • Member since
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Posted by Ragnar on Friday, May 21, 2010 2:31 PM

I have used Rustoleum, Valspar, and Krylon clear coats with no yellowing. A word of Caution though these are all fairly hot paints, so make sure you cover the area with mist coats and allow them to dry before putting on a wet coat of these paints. Otherwise they can damage your colour coat. I have military miniatures that are over thirty years old clear coated with Krylon that have just as good of finishes as they did when I first painted them.

CHEERS!

CHEERS!

Tom

 Old Hot Rodders are Like Old Hot Rods, We may not be as Fast as The New Guys, But We Got There First!

  • Member since
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  • From: Pasadena, CA
Posted by Ddms on Saturday, May 22, 2010 4:43 PM

shucky
Again, I do not agree that lacquer paint requires hours and hours of work to achieve a "glossy" finish.

I'm with you, shucky. If it's done right, it's a quick process.

The most important thing is to remove all paint texture. You can do that by compounding, but that takes quite a bit of time, especially if the paint was sprayed too dry or too thick. Regardless, if you don't spend a lot of time compounding, you'll get a glossy finish on top of - arrrgh - textured paint.

A much faster and more efficient way to remove texture is to wet-sand with 1500 or 2000 grit paper - takes about half-an-hour if the car is sprayed properly with a good synthetic lacquer like Tamiya TS series. (By "properly," I mean a warm can, held close to the model and moved quickly.) I think that the paint should be absolutely flat - ZERO TEXTURE - before compounding.

My experience is that wet-sanding with the fine grits is actually less prone to burn-through than lengthy compounding. A small swatch of paper is easier to control than a rag, so you can avoid areas you don't want to hit. 

I then use a very mild rubbing compound, followed by some scratch X.

Different strokes, but a similar approach. I follow the sanding with Tamiya Coarse. It easily takes down the scratch pattern made by 1500/2000 grit, so there's no need for a time-consuming polishing "system." Then I use Tamiya Fine, which brings up a high gloss.

Basically, that completes the polishing process. The result is a high gloss finish on an untextured finish with no visible scratch pattern. (As you can tell, I have a phobia about paint texture. And I think that "polishing systems" are the most over-rated product in the industry. I do realize that some excellent modelers swear by them.)

Sometimes I use Tamiya Finish when I'm ready to display the car. It's the equivalent of wax - it gives you an even glossier finish than Tamiya Fine. 


DDMS

  • Member since
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Posted by Nicaragua on Saturday, May 22, 2010 7:48 PM

"The only lacquer that dries without getting pebbly is urethane, because it doesn't really dry, it hardens, and thus does not shrink"

 

are you shure about that? I thought Urethane and PolyUrethane were not lacquers...but hey guys how about automotive finishes like polyurethanes? 

  • Member since
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  • From: Pasadena, CA
Posted by Ddms on Saturday, May 22, 2010 11:29 PM

It's true that automotive urethanes have a smooth finish, but they need to be clear coated with either synthetic lacquer or 2-part urethane.Two-part urethane gives you an extremely high gloss, but beware: it's very tough and difficult to strip.

If they're sufficiently thinned and sprayed from the right distance, synthetic lacquers like Tamiya TS-series paints do not look "pebbly" when they dry. They dry glossy, but do have some texture, so they need to be smoothed and polished to look realistic. Some modelers go directly to compound; I prefer to wet-sand first with 1500/2000 grit paper.

Far as I know, polyurethane is available only in large quantities. 

I often paint with Omni, PPG or Dupont Chromabase automotive urethane. These are single-part color coats ("basecoats") that body shops buy in small quantities for small jobs and touch-up. They have to be clear coated. You can use TS-13, but I prefer U-POL, a pro clear coat that comes from the UK in a spray can. It behaves just like TS-13, so I'm pretty sure it's also a synthetic lacquer.     

DDMS

  • Member since
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Posted by phill on Sunday, May 23, 2010 1:45 AM
You can spray urethane over just about anything, as urethane is not really a lacquer. I call it a lacquer because automobiles were sprayed with real lacquer at one time and when they switched to urethane they called it "acrylic" or "synthetic" lacquer or some such. Urethane comes in two parts, and you can indeed get them in smaller quantity like a quart. You only shoot one coat. The upside of urethane is it dries the way it looks when it’s wet. So when you spray it what you see is what you’ll get. The downside is there is no fixing if you make a mistake. You can’t strip it. It is tough to polish. The reason it is tough to polish is that it doesn’t “melt” like lacquer and enamels. Polishing urethane is like polishing plastic – and you know how hard it is to get scratches out of plastic windshields.

I also stand by what I said about Tamiya TS-13. If you are good at polishing TS-13 is the best, because you can spray half a can on a 1/24 scale body and it would not run and it would not give you that dipped in syrup appearance. But it does dry to a texture. It might be a glossy texture, but texture nevertheless - and not the kind that you see on automotive paint. So if you want to get away with doing only discretionary polishing you might want to spray something that dries to a gloss.

  • Member since
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  • From: Pasadena, CA
Posted by Ddms on Sunday, May 23, 2010 10:50 AM

phill
Urethane comes in two parts, and you can indeed get them in smaller quantity like a quart. You only shoot one coat. The upside of urethane is it dries the way it looks when it’s wet. So when you spray it what you see is what you’ll get. The downside is there is no fixing if you make a mistake. You can’t strip it. It is tough to polish.

 

I can attest to that from painful experience - at least with regard to 2k clear coat. I might try it again, but only if I GOTTA have a brilliant, dipped-in-syrup show-car gloss.

But single-part urethanes "basecoats" (color coats) are another story. They very easy to sand and strip, and no hardener/catalyst is needed.

These paints are normally used by body shops and dent-fixers for touch-up work. I buy Dupont, Omni and PPG one-part urethanes from Finishmaster for about $14 for a two-ounce bottle. They have swatch books available, and they will mix any 1:1 auto color from about the last 15 years at no extra charge. Any good automotive paint store should do the same.

One-part urethanes need to be thinned 1-part paint to 4-parts medium temp reducer, so one bottle will go a long way. They dry to a smooth satin finish, and need to be clear-coated with either 2k urethane clear (watch out!) or a synthetic lacquer clear-coat like U-POL or Tamiya TS-13. 

Thin urethane with medium temp reducer, not ordinary lacquer thinner. It can curdle the paint.

Of any paints I've airbrushed, I think these are the easiest to spray. They don't tend to sag or run. They level out beautifully and dry almost instantly to a smooth satin finish. Precise measurement isn't necessary, so it's easy to mix a small quantity. You just need to be somewhere between too transparent and too dry. Like with any paint, you'll get a pebbly finish if it's not thinned enough.

These are serious pro paints, so serious precautions are necessary. Always spray in a well-ventilated area and wear a pro respirator ($40).

 

DDMS

  • Member since
    May 2010
Posted by Nicaragua on Sunday, May 23, 2010 12:09 PM

Ddms

phill
Urethane comes in two parts, and you can indeed get them in smaller quantity like a quart. You only shoot one coat. The upside of urethane is it dries the way it looks when it’s wet. So when you spray it what you see is what you’ll get. The downside is there is no fixing if you make a mistake. You can’t strip it. It is tough to polish.

 

I can attest to that from painful experience - at least with regard to 2k clear coat. I might try it again, but only if I GOTTA have a brilliant, dipped-in-syrup show-car gloss.

Of any paints I've airbrushed, I think these are the easiest to spray. .

These are serious pro paints, so serious precautions are necessary. Always spray in a well-ventilated area and wear a pro respirator ($40).

 

to me nothing say pro like a pro paint......and yes you do need a respirator but if you learn how to spray them and how to finish them, then nothing will beat the deep shine of a pro paint job
  • Member since
    February 2020
  • From: Massachusetts
Posted by Ricmod on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 6:33 PM

After reading all of these posts, I see that many of you have issues with orange peeling. The cause of orange peeling is poor surface prep on the plastic. Paint reacts poorly over the silicon release agents used by the model manufacturer. Be sure to wipe the plastic down with a grease and wax remover before priming. Primer brings out any flaws in the plastic so you can fill and sand before paint.  Sand the primer with 600 grit paper and your ready to go. Just be sure not to eat a pizza or greasy chicken wings before handling your model. Grease and wax remover is an automotive product.

ric

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