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paint process?

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  • Member since
    May 2008
paint process?
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, February 14, 2004 9:42 PM
This part confuses me the most. I have read alot of posts both here and on the FSM board in regards to the painting process(on bodies), but Iam still pretty confused. Im not sure that I understand the difference between dry coat and a wet coat. I think a dry coat is aka "mist coat" but im not certain. Also what exactly is a base coat? is it the primer or is it the paint that is sprayed over the primer. Im hoping that someone can give me a little step by step on how to paint. I know most of you have probably developed a system that works best for you, thus the reason why there is so many ways to go about this. But a cliff notes version for a beginner would really be appreciated...man my fingers are tired lol. thanks in advance
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Boss_Hotrod on Saturday, February 14, 2004 10:11 PM
A dry coat I beleive is where you spray/mist paint but it doesnt look wet like a wet coat would. A base coat is something like a silver under a candy color. (or atleast I think so.) I dont really get good paint jobs on my cars because I dont do all the steps (hince the "I think"s).
http://public.fotki.com/69Hotrod/model_cars/ http://www.imagestation.com/mypictures/
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Illinois
Posted by hot ford coupe on Saturday, February 14, 2004 10:38 PM
I guess I'll take a crack at this question since i'm in the middle of practicing my painting skills. The primer is the part that goes next to the plastic. It helps highlight the body defects so you can see and correct them. It also helps the paint to bond better. Use a gray primer first. It helps you see better than the white primer. You then cover the gray with a white primer unless you use silver or black for your main color. That way, you won't need so many coats to cover the gray. Don't forget that most of the paints we use are a bit translucent and will show the color underneath. The next coat is your base coat of color. I finish off with clear so I will be polishing that coat, not thinning out my color coat. If you are using a candy color, you need to cover your primer with silver or gold to get the proper shade tones since candy colors are much more translucent and really show the undercoat.
Now with that said, whatever type of coat you're applying, you mist on the first several coats to get a bite. That is the "dry" coat. It is thin and almost hits the model dry. The wet coats are where you put a heavier layer of paint down for a smoother layer. Be careful because too much paint will cause runs and sags. The final clear layer seals paint and allows me to polish the model without having thin spots in my color coat which may cause the paint to look blotchy in the case of translucent paint. Finally, that great smooth finish is done not with the airbrush or the rattle can, but with the polishing techniques.
Remember, Painting and polishing require a great deal of patience. There are no shortcuts to quality, only to completions. There are plenty of examples in this forum of great work. Each one of them took a great deal of care and patience. That's why they look as beautiful as they do. Hopefully my technique is relatively correct. . If I've made any errors or omitted something I'm sure someone out there will cover my back. Good luck !
I'm hopelessly addicted to building models. Not finishing them, just building them.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 15, 2004 9:21 AM
unless i'm mistaken ,ithink you covered it pretty well...only thing i'd dare to add is the thinning of the paint to get it to level and not 'bunch up' and stay orange peel.....me being very lazy ,i dont want to polish out a paint job, so if i can get it smooth first shot, all the better,....there are i believe many schools of thought on painting a model so keep reading ,there will be moreCoolCoolCool
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Illinois
Posted by hot ford coupe on Sunday, February 15, 2004 10:11 AM
Sounds good, Supermacks. I guess I left out the thinning part because I use rattlecans more than the airbrush. I'm sure I'm kind of old school in my thinking. The more opinions and techniques, the better. I still need a lot more practice with the airbrush before I can the kind of results I routinely see here. Keep the info coming.
I'm hopelessly addicted to building models. Not finishing them, just building them.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 15, 2004 2:06 PM
thanks to all of you who took the time to reply as i know it was a rather lengthy question and not one that has a definitive answer. there are definately less grey areas in my mind now when it comes to painting, thanks again guys.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 15, 2004 11:09 PM
newb here. pretty helpful. ive been practicing on old models ive done(messedup).

my request... how exactly does the polishing process go? toools, equipment and process... thanks in advance guys.

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