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Removing paint residue from polishing kits.

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  • Member since
    May 2008
Removing paint residue from polishing kits.
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 5, 2004 9:39 PM
Does anyone know of a good way to remove the buildup paint residue on polishing cloths? I have tried several things with no sucess. Water doesen't work. I even tried submerging the cloths in paint thinner. It ruined the cloth. Polishing kits are expensive. I'm finding that I need to purchase a new kit every time I polish a new body. That is costly. The fact that the grits are so fine, they buildup with residue in no time. Would an eraser work? I know thats how you clean regular sandpaper.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 5, 2004 11:13 PM
Are you even using clear coat on this. If so try putting on one more coat then what you all ready have. Also you do not have to polish it like you are sanding it so take your time and do it easy. Sounds like to me you are just pushing down way to hard and sanding to much off of this if you are getting paint in it. I have had my Polishing kit for a year now and not one time have i had to wash it out.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 6, 2004 12:09 AM
No clearcoat. I could see how clearcoat would prevent alot of the paint from transferring to the cloth. I guess if your not actually sanding on the paint, there is nothing to "build-up". Unless i'm doing decals or some type of graphics I never use clear. That's a very good point though. Thanks for the tip. Approve
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Southern Maryland
Posted by Likittysplit on Friday, February 6, 2004 1:29 AM
This might sound like a dumb question, but are you using your cloths wet or dry? The first time I used my polishing kit I ignored the advice to use 'em wet. The end result was that the cloth worked, but the corner I used loaded up with the small amount of paint that was removed from the body and was rendered usless for any more polishing. I now use lots of water with just a tiny bit (3 or 4 drops per gallon) of dish soap. Using it this way, like Chas I have had no problems with the polishing cloths loading up in the past year or so.

Proud owner of a 1:1 1997 Camaro Z/28 30th Anniversary edition and 2004 Monte Carlo SS supercharged Dale Earnhardt, Sr. "Intimidator" edition.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Denver
Posted by dag65 on Friday, February 6, 2004 11:28 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Likittysplit

This might sound like a dumb question, but are you using your cloths wet or dry? The first time I used my polishing kit I ignored the advice to use 'em wet. The end result was that the cloth worked, but the corner I used loaded up with the small amount of paint that was removed from the body and was rendered usless for any more polishing. I now use lots of water with just a tiny bit (3 or 4 drops per gallon) of dish soap. Using it this way, like Chas I have had no problems with the polishing cloths loading up in the past year or so.
Sign - Ditto I always use water and have had the same kit for 3 years now
I want to be a race car passenger: just a guy who bugs the driver. "Say man, can I turn on the radio? You should slow down. Why do we gotta keep going in circles? Can I put my feet out the window? Man, you really like Tide..." http://public.fotki.com/BigPoppa/darins_stuff-1/
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 6, 2004 1:19 PM
That may be my problem. I don't use water for the simple fact that it's hard to "read" areas that you have already sanded. I think I better start using it though before I go broke!
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Denver
Posted by dag65 on Friday, February 6, 2004 2:13 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by modelcarguy

That may be my problem. I don't use water for the simple fact that it's hard to "read" areas that you have already sanded. I think I better start using it though before I go broke!

This may sound funny but I can tell where I have sanded by the sound and feel of the polishing cloth
I want to be a race car passenger: just a guy who bugs the driver. "Say man, can I turn on the radio? You should slow down. Why do we gotta keep going in circles? Can I put my feet out the window? Man, you really like Tide..." http://public.fotki.com/BigPoppa/darins_stuff-1/
  • Member since
    November 2003
Posted by scalespeedworks on Friday, February 6, 2004 10:06 PM
Polish near a light as it's easier to see what you've done in the reflection. If you still have trouble seeing it while wet, have a piece of tissue paper on hand and wipe it down every now and then.
Ron http://www.scalespeedworks.com http://public.fotki.com/lauron/rons/model_cars/
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: CA Gold Country foothills.
Posted by mishalah on Saturday, February 7, 2004 8:36 AM
You should always polish wet. Dry polishing is like sanding. The cloth will bite too hard into the paint (that's why you get excess residue), and it creates enough heat to actually melt the paint a little while you are polishing (that's why it sticks in the polishing cloth).

Wet polishing is more trouble, but much safer for the paint. Just keep two extra cloths at your hand. One should be damp, and one should be dry. After you polish a little, wipe with the damp cloth to remove the excess paint. Then, wipe with the dry cloth and look at the surface in good light to see if more of the same grit is needed. I actually prefer running water or a sink partially full.

You can clean the cloths with dishsoap and warm water if you haven't burned paint into the cloth. Once the paint has been heated by the friction and imbedded into the cloth they are pretty much ruined.

"Help me....I've fallen and I can't get up."...my models are crushing me. my pics: https://public.fotki.com/dallas916/

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: East Tennessee, Hillbilly Country
Posted by crzyhorse on Sunday, February 8, 2004 2:09 PM
If you're loading up your polishing cloths (most likely the 3200&3600) you're starting with too rough a surface for the grit. Try using 2000grit sandpaper 1st.If you go slow& light with it you should get a level surface for the polishing cloths without burning through the clear or paint. (I always use clear on my paint) Also if you use 2000 grit on the last color before the clear, or the second to last clear coat you'll get a much better finish on your final clear. This will make polising MUCH easier
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Australia
Posted by warra48 on Friday, February 13, 2004 3:36 AM
Definitely wet sand. Also. if you don't wait long enough for your paint to cure before you polish, it will load the cloths up much quicker.
I've had the same polishing kit for over 5 years without problems this way.

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