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Sandiing paint and clearcoat

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  • Member since
    February 2020
Sandiing paint and clearcoat
Posted by Manifoldhead on Monday, May 11, 2020 10:52 PM

Hi All,

New guy here. If you are using clearcoat, and your basecoat has some orange peel, is it necessary to sand it smooth, or will shooting clear coat and sanding, polishing and waxing the clear coat be enough to give a it that nice shine.

 

Thanks.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:51 AM

That's part of the beauty of clear coats.

If the color coats are not perfectly smooth, you can cure a lot of ills with some clear and polishing.

I've done it many times.

 

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by Manifoldhead on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 11:01 AM

Goofy62

That's part of the beauty of clear coats.

If the color coats are not perfectly smooth, you can cure a lot of ills with some clear and polishing.

I've done it many times.

 

 

 

Steve

 

 

Thank you!

 

I had such a hard time with my first model, my second had a *llittle* orange peel and and I was afraid burn through the base coat. The clearcoat had some as well but still looks pretty good. Not perfect but decent. I was afraid to sand it because I want to go on to learning other techniques like BMF and I didn't want to completely mess it up. Next time, it's I'll give it a good sand and polish and try for that perfect finish!

  • Member since
    February 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 4:01 PM

Clear coats will help "fill" light orange peel, but your final gloss coat will never be any better than your worst prior coat because you can "see" down through the clear coat to the coats below and the light shining through the clear coat will reflect off the irregularities below it. That's why, to get that "mile deep" look, where the light reflects evenly down through the color coats and back up again, it's best to sand and polish between coats before getting to your clear coat. I wet sand using fine grit papers, usually 1000 grit out to 2000 grit. Where I have to work irregularities out I might start with 800, or even 400 for particularly bad spots like dust or scratches. If I have to work at smoothing the color coat I'll usually opt for an additional light color coat once I've gotten things evened out again.

Once I've gotten a very smooth color coat layer I'll move to the next coats of either color or clear depending on what I'm doing. When I am painting solid colors I'll go to clear when I've got a smooth, even color coat. If I'm shooting metallics or candies then I'll get a smooth, even base color and then move to my final color coat, repeating the wet sanding process, and then seal it all under clear.

I find if I'm desciplined about this process I can lay down a couple of thin coats of clear with a bare minimum of final polishing because the prior layers are so smooth.

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:04 PM

gbk1

Clear coats will help "fill" light orange peel, but your final gloss coat will never be any better than your worst prior coat because you can "see" down through the clear coat to the coats below and the light shining through the clear coat will reflect off the irregularities below it. That's why, to get that "mile deep" look, where the light reflects evenly down through the color coats and back up again, it's best to sand and polish between coats before getting to your clear coat. I wet sand using fine grit papers, usually 1000 grit out to 2000 grit. Where I have to work irregularities out I might start with 800, or even 400 for particularly bad spots like dust or scratches. If I have to work at smoothing the color coat I'll usually opt for an additional light color coat once I've gotten things evened out again.

Once I've gotten a very smooth color coat layer I'll move to the next coats of either color or clear depending on what I'm doing. When I am painting solid colors I'll go to clear when I've got a smooth, even color coat. If I'm shooting metallics or candies then I'll get a smooth, even base color and then move to my final color coat, repeating the wet sanding process, and then seal it all under clear.

I find if I'm desciplined about this process I can lay down a couple of thin coats of clear with a bare minimum of final polishing because the prior layers are so smooth.

 

Actually, I never sand between coats at all.

I let my clear and polishing do the work for me, and I at least am very happy with the majority of my finishes.

Granted, the smoother the color coats are, the easier it is, but I've discovered over time that with some of the Duplicolor products that I use, such as the primer and clear become smoother with each successive coat.

That saves me a boat load of sanding.

 

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by 58volvoV8 on Friday, May 15, 2020 8:32 PM

I just can't bring myself to put sand paper to fresh paint...i have lightly wet sanded my primer coats.then added a last primer coat then paint then clear. But I just can't do it. The glass finish idea is great but the idea of burning through my paint all ways makes me say screw it it's good enough.

Now brushing future floor polish on for a gloss finish seems like something I'd try.....but haven't yet.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, May 16, 2020 11:37 AM

58volvoV8

I just can't bring myself to put sand paper to fresh paint...i have lightly wet sanded my primer coats.then added a last primer coat then paint then clear. But I just can't do it. The glass finish idea is great but the idea of burning through my paint all ways makes me say screw it it's good enough.

Now brushing future floor polish on for a gloss finish seems like something I'd try.....but haven't yet.

 

The quantity of clear coat used is also directly related to the possibility of burning through to the paint or primer.

If you use the right clear and apply it correctly, it's much easier to keep it from happening.

I use Duplicolor clear over my lacquer paint jobs and will generally apply as many as 5 coats.

This adds enough depth, and the product is tough enough, to guard against the possibility of polishing through.

Plus, the product lays down in very thin coats, so detail hide is not an issue.

Products like Testors clear lacquers go on thicker and are not as durable.

A good number of builders will use a single coat of one of the Testors products and call it good enough.

This is fine if you can pull off a perfectly smooth and shiny paint job that way, but it doesn't provide a lot of protection against burning through if you plan on polishing.

I have always been of the opinion that even with a nearly perfect paint job, polishing adds a certain more realistic luster to the paint than just leaving it as is.

Often a paint job that has not been polished can exhibit a " hard candy" like appearance that is not particularly reealistic looking.

Just my opinion on the matter.

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

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