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Issue with Yost's Method of Using Aluminum Metalizer Lacquer as a Primer

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  • Member since
    April 2019
Issue with Yost's Method of Using Aluminum Metalizer Lacquer as a Primer
Posted by PeterM on Monday, February 17, 2020 11:35 AM
In Donn Yost’s “The Art of Airbrushing” he uses Testor’s Aluminum Plate Buffing Metalizer Lacquer spray paint (TES 1451) as a primer along with his enamel/lacquer 2:1 base coat method.
 What I have noticed is the base coat is not adhering to the primer surface to well. The base coat can be easily chipped.  I have also experience the base coat pulling off the primer by masking tape. I do not want to mention the masking tape brand at this time but I can tell you that the tape used did use a low adhesion adhesive (not very sticky).
 In the coming weeks I am planning to do some controlled paint adhesion pull-tests with Testor’s 1451 as the baseline against other primers to see how they perform with different masking tapes.
 But before I spend $ and time on testing, has anyone experienced a similar issue in using the metalizer lacquer as a primer?
  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Tampa, FL.
Posted by Jantrix on Monday, February 17, 2020 12:30 PM

Donn is available online in a number of locations. FB, MCM, Instagram. I'd chat him up and discuss your findings with the source.

Rob Geeked There is a nasty little four letter word for building something you're not interested in - work. And that's not what we do here. My Photo Album

  • Member since
    September 2011
Posted by BUGATTI FAN on Tuesday, February 18, 2020 1:48 AM

Maybe worth trying an automotive acrylic white primer first of all to give good adhesion before using the metaliser lacquer method on top. This possibly will give something that the metaliser can grip to a bit better than the plastic. Before priming as an extra step for paint adhesion I always go over a car body with a worn plastic kitchen scouring pad like Scotchbrite. This dulls the shiny plastic and gives even the primer a better surface to grip to. Washed off with detergent and left to dry before the primer goes on.

  • Member since
    April 2019
Posted by PeterM on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 7:54 AM
Thanks. I am not on FB, MCM, Instagram.
  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 11:19 AM

Donn Yost is a highly respected member of the hobby community, and a recognised expert on model painting. Though I am aware of it, I have never tried his method of using Aluminum Buffing Metalizer as a primer. But, I am intimately familiar with using Aluminum Buffing Metalizer for its intended purpose, and being so familiar with it, I cannot comprehend how it could possibly be used as a primer, for the exact reasons you have experienced.

I have not read Donn's reasons for suggesting the buffing metaliser, and he may have some good points for doing so, and perhaps some specific application methods. I suspect that much of his reason has to do with the way in which the metalisers reveal all underlying details... they hide nothing. That's a good quality for a primer, but the metaliser has a 'loose' or 'dusty' surface, which will deter adhesion by top coats of paint. Even when buffed, the surface remains a little loose, and buffing would have occurr in all of the tiniest grooves and and hard to reach corners in order to get the surface even remotely stable.

I respect Donn's place in this community, and I am all for experimentation. But if you are having difficulties with this method, then use a quality primer under your paint, which 99% of good builders do. There is no reason not to.

The bottom line is; I can't see any way to use the buffing metaliser as a primer without experiencing the problems you did. It is exactly as expected.

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    April 2019
Posted by PeterM on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:35 AM

Hi Branford

 

I believed Donn did mention that it does reveals underlying details very well. I also suspected that the loose fuss of the Metalizer was the issue since it gets onto everything once touched. In regard to primers that reveal details, would you recommend any of these two: Testors Grey Sandable Lacquer spray rimer (2981) or Testors White Primer (Lacquer ) Spray primer (28138)?

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:54 AM

I haven't experimented much with primers, so I'm not the best one to ask. Some guys have done a lot of experimenting and would likely have better insights. 

I used to use the old school Testors grey primer 2937 for years, until about 15 years ago I tried a can of Tamiya lacquer primer, and never looked back.  I use Tamiya grey or white as needed. They are fine primers and go on thinly. They are pretty easy on the details. 

To preserve the details I use primer sparingly. I also mask fine details such as scripts, badges, and vent grills before any bodywork or primer. If they eventually need primer I remove the masks and give a light spray just before final clean up and paint, otherwise I paint these details as they are for maximum crispness. 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

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