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Paint prep after stripping chrome?

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  • Member since
    September 2019
Paint prep after stripping chrome?
Posted by Paul L on Monday, September 23, 2019 2:10 PM

I've stripped the chrome from a couple of AMT parts pack engines. I used Bleche White per the reccomendations I found here searching the forum. Worked great!
What needs to be done to the 'shiney' finish left after stripping before painting the parts?
TIA, Paul

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 7:46 AM

That 'shiny finish' is a lacquer undercoat which basically acts as a primer for the metalised coating (chrome). Stripping the 'chrome' is easily done, but the lacquer coating is a bit more tenacious.

There are a number of paint/chrome strippers in use by model builders. Castrol Super Clean (the purple pond) is likely the most popular, and many claim that it removes the lacquer coat as well, though personally I have had little luck with it. Maybe my product is too old.

Anyway, I have tried Easy Off oven cleaner (the real stuff, not the fresh scent stuff or any knock-offs) with some luck, though after a good soak it still took some work with a stiff brush and toothpicks under running water to get the lacquer out of the grooves and corners. This stuff can be nasty, so use latex gloves and eye protection. I put the parts in a baggie and spray in some oven cleaner until the parts are soaking, then leave it for a day or two.

I have had great luck stripping stubborn lacquer paints with brake fluid, and I think the next time I strip chrome I will be giving this stuff a try. It may take a few days of soaking if the coating is particularly tough.

Another stripper that apparently works great on lacquer paint (though I haven't tried it) is 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol). It can be bought at the drug store, and would be less messy than brake fluid.

Or, you can leave the lacquer in place. Make certain that the stripping product is completely removed from the parts, and the parts are clean and dry. You can paint right over it, or use your favorite primer. I usually try to remove the lacquer coat because it hides finely engraved detail. If this is not an issue, then paint right over it.

If you try any of this, let us know how you make out.

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    October 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 9:17 AM

Hi;

    I usually use Easy Off Oven Cleaner.(The original Formula) because with a stiff nylon brush it gets clean .  T.B. 

gjgeracci
  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Paul L on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 12:52 PM

Bainford

That 'shiny finish' is a lacquer undercoat which basically acts as a primer for the metalised coating (chrome). Stripping the 'chrome' is easily done, but the lacquer coating is a bit more tenacious.

There are a number of paint/chrome strippers in use by model builders. Castrol Super Clean (the purple pond) is likely the most popular, and many claim that it removes the lacquer coat as well, though personally I have had little luck with it. Maybe my product is too old.

Anyway, I have tried Easy Off oven cleaner (the real stuff, not the fresh scent stuff or any knock-offs) with some luck, though after a good soak it still took some work with a stiff brush and toothpicks under running water to get the lacquer out of the grooves and corners. This stuff can be nasty, so use latex gloves and eye protection. I put the parts in a baggie and spray in some oven cleaner until the parts are soaking, then leave it for a day or two.

I have had great luck stripping stubborn lacquer paints with brake fluid, and I think the next time I strip chrome I will be giving this stuff a try. It may take a few days of soaking if the coating is particularly tough.

Another stripper that apparently works great on lacquer paint (though I haven't tried it) is 91% - 99% isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol). It can be bought at the drug store, and would be less messy than brake fluid.

Or, you can leave the lacquer in place. Make certain that the stripping product is completely removed from the parts, and the parts are clean and dry. You can paint right over it, or use your favorite primer. I usually try to remove the lacquer coat because it hides finely engraved detail. If this is not an issue, then paint right over it.

If you try any of this, let us know how you make out.

Thanks for the tips Trevor, I've done 4-5 engines with the Bleche White and had very good luck with it. Typically overnight and it's done.
I'll try your suggestions and will post my results.

  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Paul L on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 12:57 PM

gjgeracci, I wanted to stay away from the toxic methods if possible.
Did the Easy Off remove the laquer coating too?

  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Paul L on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 4:43 PM

I did another engine with Bleche White and got different results. These were done overnight, about 12 hours on each.
The pieces on the left are from a Revell parts pack and the one on the right are from the AMT '34 PickUp kit.
You can see the 'shiney' laquer on the Revell parts but the AMT parts came out clean.
Apparently two different processes to apply chrome to plastic.

 

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Wednesday, September 25, 2019 1:59 AM

oldcarguy
I usually use Easy Off Oven Cleaner.

to all, make sure you use the heavy duty version. the non-toxic version does nothing.

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/87459383@N07/albums

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