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Need a good tutorial for "washes"

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  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Thursday, August 29, 2019 4:14 AM

PatrickN
The block for the flat 12 is aluminum and as I said, Ferrari at its finest. How much wash would be used on something like this?

with flat black, too much and it will look like a greasy old engine. better to use a copper or gold thin wash to look like heat tempered metal.

also color variations like beige or blue can break up the monotone if used in tiny amounts.

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/87459383@N07/albums

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Tehachapi, CA
Posted by PatrickN on Tuesday, August 27, 2019 10:46 AM

Bainford,

Good to hear from you again! I appreciate all your suggestions. Actually the pastels idea is a winner! I had forgotten that I used that on my rusty tank project! I have plenty of charcoals in different shades. I will give them a try.

Like I said, only the block itself is assembled so I can do some various techniques. If I don't like it, I can always strip it!

Thanks again!

"Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana."- Groucho Marx

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, August 27, 2019 6:39 AM

Another vote for acrylic washes. I often make mine from Tamiya flat black or semi-gloss black (finer particle size) thinned with alcohol. I haven't tried using water as a thinner, but if I did, I would try a drop of dish washing detergent to reduce surface tension and let the wash flow well. When it comes to washes, thinner is better. If it is too thin, you can do a second or third coat, or add more paint to your wash mix, which is easier than going on too thick an needing to repaint. Also, washes seem to lighten up when dry, so if it seems a little bit heavy when applied, it may look ok when dry.

Like Mike, I also use the Tamiya Panel Line Accent wash quite a bit too, but be aware it is an enamel and can effect the underlying paint if it is also enamel. The Tamiya Panel Line Accent comes in black, grey and brown. If the black is a bit too stark, the other colours may be useful.

Lacquer thinned washes make the best washes in terms of low surface tension and good capilliary action, but I have found that they often melt the base coat of lacquer or enamel paint. YMMV. If you are new to washes, definately paint up a couple of scrap engine/transaxels or similar parts to test your mix, and refine your technique. I sometimes apply a wash to particular areas with a small detail brush, or depending on the application, I load up a larger brush and flood the entire surface of the part.

In addition to liquid washes, it is sometimes effective to get some artists pastels in black, brown, grey, etc and use an exacto blade to scrape some fine powder onto a pallet. Use a soft brush to liberally apply the powder. These can work well on their own, or in conjunction with a wash.

That's just a few ideas I've had success with. I'm no expert, but this has worked for me. Good luck.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

Trevor

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Monday, August 26, 2019 7:18 PM

Hi, Patrick! I used flat or semi-gloss black acrylic (Testors Acryl) and water. A little experimentation with reduction will get you pointed in the right direction. If you're not happy with the result, even when dry the wash can be removed with a drop of Dawn in warm water and a toothbrush. Lacquer thinner will likely dissolve or at least soften anything under it. I use acrylic exclusively except on chrome plated parts. If the acrylic doesn't apply and stick evenly to the chrome, I'll go to an enamel wash using an enamel thinner and not lacquer thinner. Just food for thought. Geeked

 

chucky

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Tehachapi, CA
Posted by PatrickN on Monday, August 26, 2019 4:41 PM

Laquer Thinner! That's what is lacking! Thank you much! but what will the lacquer thinner do to the base coat of Tamiya flat aluminum? Anything?

"Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana."- Groucho Marx

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, August 26, 2019 4:17 PM

Patrick, I would suggest using flat black paint and slow or medium drying lacquer thinner.  The paint will dry quicker if you use the thinner.  Use a small brush and just a little wash on the nuts and bolts and any details that could use a little enhancing.  I would also suggest mixing up enough for a few projects and keep it tightly capped so it doesn't dry up on you. 

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-'67 Foose Dodge Coronet; 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Tehachapi, CA
Posted by PatrickN on Monday, August 26, 2019 2:30 PM

Mike,

Thanks for the tip! I have the detailer's black wash but it looks more blue than black! I will try to post a photo of it if I can...

The block for the flat 12 is aluminum and as I said, Ferrari at its finest. How much wash would be used on something like this? And can I make my own from flat black and water? I've never done much in the way of washes and since the engine is in the very first stages of construction, it can easily be repainted.

Thanks again for the help!

"Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana."- Groucho Marx

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Monday, August 26, 2019 11:42 AM

Patrick, I use either The Detailer Black Wash or Tamiya Panel Line Accent Color Black for my washes.  You can also thin out some flat black paint with thinner to make a wash.  Use a small fine brush and apply your wash to nuts and bolts and details on the block to bring out that detail.  Some details will need just a little wash while some will require more coats of wash.  Let the wash dry and then add another coat for additional highlights.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

On my bench-'67 Foose Dodge Coronet; 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    February, 2010
  • From: Tehachapi, CA
Need a good tutorial for "washes"
Posted by PatrickN on Monday, August 26, 2019 8:31 AM

I'm building several Ferrari F1 cars, and while I know F! is meticulous about keeping things clean, I think the basic engine blocks of the flat 12 cylinder "boxer" engine could use a wash to bring out all the details.

Anyone got a good tutorial or advice?

"Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana."- Groucho Marx

 

 

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