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Primer Help.

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DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Primer Help.
Posted by DDD on Thursday, April 25, 2019 7:24 PM

I'm priming a 67 chevy chevelle using Rust-Oleum 2X Primer. I washed everything, sanded down the mold lines and smoothed it all out. I put on 2 mist coats then 2 heavier coats started wet sanding with 800 then 1000 went down to the body. sprayed it 2 more heavy times and wet sanded 1000 then 1500, 2500 and I can't seem to get it smooth and all one shade without sanding thru. Last model I used Plastikote and had crappy luck. Is it easier to airbrush primer or use a rattle can. I would like to use the airbrush so I don't have wasted paint and les toxic. It is getting frustrating, need some good advice. I'm airbrushing Model Master and Aztek Acrylics. Also is there a youtube video on a close up what the finished primer should look like?

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Friday, April 26, 2019 2:32 PM

I switched to Mr Color products a few years ago and have found them to be some of the best.  I always prime with" Mr Finishing Surface 1500"  thinned with" Mr Color Leveling Thinner" mixed 50/50.  I mix a bottle of primer and store it in bottles so I always have it ready to go, I find it will last premixed for months with no problem. Many times I spray my color coat over the primer with out sanding.  If I do all I do is hit it with come 4000 sanding pads. I know Mr Color can be a little hard to find but Hobby World USA has them. They also sell this in spray cans whitch I do keep around and it works very well also.

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Friday, April 26, 2019 3:45 PM

I am far from an expert on such things, but it seems as though you are laying the primer on too heavy. After I do the main mold line removal, panel scribing, sink mark filling and block sanding, I wash the body and lay down one moderate coat of Tamiya primer. Then I fix any imperfections, and lightly wet sand the primer smooth with 1000 or 1500 grit wet. This subsequent work will leave some bare areas, so I wash, dry, and lay down one more fairly light to moderate coat of primer. Then I dry sand with 1500 or 2000 grit paper, more of a scuffing and smoothing the surface really. Hardly any primer is removed during that step. Then I wash, dry (blot off the water with a lint free cloth, then air dry really well) and paint.

That's my method, anyway. My primary concern during body work is to have as little primer on the model as I can get away with (while also ensuring I have enough on), so as to maintain accurate body contours and preserve molded in details.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

Trevor

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Friday, April 26, 2019 4:45 PM

Thanks ViperDoug I'll check into that. Also thanks Bainford, I believe you are right about to much primer. When I wet sand I seem to leave sand marks in the primer. I tried to sand down the primer and then hit it with another coat and it came out worse so now I stripping it all down with oven cleaner and will start over using your advice. Thanks again.

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Friday, April 26, 2019 7:41 PM

I agree with what Trevor said.  I also forgot to say that when I remove panel lines and mold lines that after sanding with maybe 600 I brush on a coat of Tamyia "Liquid Surface Primer-G" over the lines and then sand again up to 1500 grit till most if not all the primer is gone and then I'll spray my Mr Surface 1500. The Tamiya primer I am talking about is very thick and is  brushed on. 

I have found that for me primers that are from auto part stores are just to thick for my work and I normally only need to apply a thin coat of primer before the finish coat goes on.  Also I wash my body with soap and water after sanding between coats and just before the top coat goes on. I have to say that I have found that for me that using Mr Color products with Zero, Splash and Gravity Colors top coats has made a great improvement in my final finish. Anyway this is my way of doing things, I hope maybe this was some help.  If you have anymore questions just ask.

Doug

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Friday, April 26, 2019 8:36 PM

Thanks Doug, I'll use any advice I can get. Hopefully the eazy-off will tatke off this primer so I can start from scratch and try something new.

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Friday, April 26, 2019 8:39 PM

Has any body had good luck with Vallejo primers?

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Friday, April 26, 2019 8:57 PM

i don’t like it at all, also dosnt sand well. Badger Stynylrez is a very good primer if you want a less toxic primer, just a pain to clean out the airbrush. It’s very forgiving and dries very smooth

 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Saturday, April 27, 2019 8:49 AM

The Vallejo paints are your problem. They are NOT made for styrene car models. Do yourself a favor and dump them. Try Tamiya's acrylics or nearly anyone elses.

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

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