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Need Acrylic paint help for this rookie.

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DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Need Acrylic paint help for this rookie.
Posted by DDD on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 6:23 PM

New to modeling. I have built 3 models so far each one getting better and that was with rattle cans. Now that I got a airbrush & Comp. I would like to know anyones thoughts on Acrylics and thinners. Seen alot of different formulas and brands of paint on youtube and  Been practicing with craft paint and different thinners but it seems to wipe off after drying. Any advice would be awesome. Later.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 7:45 PM

Okay, well if you're using craft paints you're a little off base. I don't use acrylics but, I can tell you those paints are good for custom interior colors and the like but they require a primer base and immediate topcoating (clear coating) to be usable. 90% of the time you can tell it's a flat paint, even under gloss. In short, it sucks. There's a reason it's .89cents for two to three ounces.

Someone else will be along very shortly with something vastly more helpful, I assure you. ;)

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 8:12 PM

Thanks 195X, I was using the craft paint to practice using my new airbrush so I didn't waste expensive paint. Just looking for some advice on which Model Acrylic paints to use like, Model master, Vallejo, etc... which one would be easier to use being that I'm still real green with the new airbrush, but thanks for the advice. I appreciate it. Later

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, March 28, 2019 1:14 PM

Any of the commonly available hobby specific acrylics will be suitable. Many builders have their preferences, but in the end they are all quality products. I use Tamiya acrylics primarily because they are available locally, though all Tamiya products are high quality so you can't really go wrong here.

It is best to stick with known thinners. If you use Tamiya acrylic paint, use Tamiya acrylic thinner to ensure compatibility. Many things can be used to thin acrylics such as isopropyl alcohol, water, water with a drop of dish soap, winshield washer fluid, methyl hydrate (gas line anti-freeze), etc. Experimentation is fun, but you have to walk before you run. Since you will be diagnosing painting issues with your new air brush, you want to be able to eliminate the paint itself from suspicion to keep life simple.

You will thin roughly 1:1 (Paint:thinner). It's a good place to start. What you are shooting for is a mixture the consistency of milk, or some will say skim milk. When stirring your thinned paint in the airbrush bottle, pull a little up the side of the bottle and watch it run back down. It should behave in the way you would expect milk to do. Generally speaking, thinner is better than thicker.

Before painting, you will wnat to primer the body. Again, I use Tamiya primer (available in grey or white) which is a very good primer, and excellent for use with all types of hobby paints (acrylic, enamel, lacquer, etc) though somewhat expensive. There are many good primers, Duplicolor being a popular one.

Before applying the primer, wash the car body with mild dish soap or hand soap under warm running water. Regular Dawn dish soap is a preferred brand. You must be sure to avoid soaps with moisturisers (lanoline, silicone, etc) or perfumes which can cause paint adhesion issues. Rinse well and blot off excess water with a lint free cloth and let air dry. Then lay down a good coat of primer. After you have repaired any body issues (parting lines, sink marks, etc), wash the body again, then lay down your final coat of primer. Once dry, sand it lightly with fine sandpaper. I use 1000 grit, but 800 or 600 will be ok. No need to go finer than 1000. Then wash for the final time.

I usually begin painting at around 20 psi, and will lower or raise the pressure depending on how things feel. I can't really expand on that except to say, if it feels right, you will probably know it. First apply paint to the hard to get spots of the body such as small coves, inside edge of wheel wells, panel edges, rocker panels, etc. Also, do all raised or sharp edges of body panels. Once you have a couple of coats in these areas, concentrate on the larger panels and overall body paint. Don't just apply the paint directly at the body, but also apply it from low angles in several directions to ensure that all sides/edges of raised detail gets paint.

Apply paint in light mist coats at first, the first coat no even getting colour on everything. The second coat will be a little heavier, then follow that with a heavier, wetter coat. I will wait between 10-20 minutes between coats.

I hope some of this is helpful. It's worth noting that this forum has many top-notch painters, and I am not one of them. Perhaps someone will chime in with further detail, or maybe correction to the advice I've given here, but that is largely the process I follow. That should get you started, though you will no doubt have further questions once you get going. Good luck.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

Trevor

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Thursday, March 28, 2019 2:08 PM

Hey Bainford, Thanks for all the help and good advice. I'm about to go practice on my plastic plates with the model masters brand I just bought. So we'll see how it goes. Practice, practice, practice. Thanks again. Later

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Thursday, March 28, 2019 6:52 PM

Okay, I practiced spraying model master gl. blk acrylic. for the last 3 hrs. Used 15/20/25 psi and also tried different thinning formulas using testors Aztek acrylic thinner. after spraying the paint it looks like sand paper, real grainy. I tried spraying on a primered plastic plate and also on a not primered plate same results. The flow seemed to be good no spitting. I also cleaned the tip frequently and did lite mist coats. If looking thru a magnifying glass the paint should look like blk electrical tape, smooth, correct? Does Rust-Oleum own Testors? becuase my testors thinner is made by Rust-Oleum. Any help on my issue I sure can use it. Later

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Thursday, March 28, 2019 7:00 PM

Sounds as if it's drying midway to the subject causing the grain. This happens to all kinds of paints. Try to get your paint the consistency of milk. Then use 10 to 15 psi a little closer to the subject and see if that helps.

 

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

DDD
  • Member since
    March, 2019
Posted by DDD on Friday, March 29, 2019 9:11 PM

Thanks 195X, I did try your tip and it did lay down the paint better, but what I found out was the rust-oleum primer was'nt laying down flat so I wet sanded my practice piece and then tried your tip. It did work better but I think I'm going to look for a better primer so thanks again. Later

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Chef D on Monday, April 08, 2019 2:33 PM

Thank you very much for this info!!!!! I am still a beginner with models myslf. I have a few disabilities, one is with my lungs. So I am only using acrylic paints! So, with this,,, I noticed you had posted about sanding with acrylics! I was'nt sure that I could sand with them!!!! Thank you very much

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Monday, April 08, 2019 6:32 PM

Okay, I had no idea you weren't sanding your primer coat. That will help a million times over. My bad for not thinking to ask. Remember, whenever wet sanding primer, to check all your gaps afterward. Oftentimes, cappilary action will carry paint silt into them and it will dry there unnoticed.

 

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

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