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Duplicolor paint issues

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  • Member since
    March, 2018
  • From: Billings, Montana
Duplicolor paint issues
Posted by montanaphil on Sunday, August 12, 2018 4:12 PM

I am using a decanted Duplicolor red thru a good airbrush with a large tip. The finish I am getting is flat and grainy. I am shooting at 40#'s of pressure. I have used Duplicolor before and got good finishes, but mostly with metalic colors that were decanted also.

I have primered with good primer, thorughly dry and clean. The red finish is awful and not acceptable.

Any thoughts? Bad paint maybe?

Thank guys.

Phil

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Sunday, August 12, 2018 4:25 PM

Sounds like it's drying on the way to the model. Back your pressure off to 20psi and see if that helps. Did you mix in any thinners or driers?

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Sunday, August 12, 2018 8:38 PM

I think they've changed their formula or something. I never had any trouble with their paints before. The last can of Bright Red I bought and used did the same thing. It dried really flat and was rougher than a night in jail. Same with the can of clear. Flat and rough. I sprayed mine straight from the can. So, it wasn't from being decanted. The paint always came out dull. But, it was usually smooth. The clear usually had a decent shine. But, not this time. This is what mine looked like after paint. It didn't look much different after clear.

 20180602_233751-1 by Roger Hayes, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Sunday, August 12, 2018 9:54 PM

Over the years I have gotten to know painting and cars pretty well. I started in the 70's painting 1 to 1 cars and building street rods and customs of my own.

The finish you describe is very familiar and has ALWAYS been due to the paint not being thinned enough with the CORRECT thinner and not having a high enough air pressure (I consistantly shoot through my airbrush at 60 PSI, and no it has never blown up Smile, Wink & Grin), and the fact that you have this finish on a project to be finished tells me you didn't make sure what you were doing would work first. ALWAYS, and I mean ALWAYS check to see that what your going to do is first done on a scrap piece of plastic or as a lot of us here do is to use white plastic picnic spoons to sample on before you do your project - primer and all.

It doesn't hurt a bit to throw away picnic spoons, but it sure does suck having to start over and not even know why or where to start to do it right.

You need to go back and figure out a repeatable system like you once had that worked for you to be able to move forward.

I hope this helps Big Smile.

 

 

 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Sunday, August 12, 2018 10:18 PM

You can still get a decent paint job with what you have Phil. It will just need some sanding and polishing. I would suggest sanding your paint smooth and shooting a good clear over it. I would advise against Dupli Color clear. I like Tamiya TS-13 the best. This is what my pickup looked like after sanding and polishing. It was a lot of work. But, I managed to save it.

 20180621_135847-1 by Roger Hayes, on Flickr

  • Member since
    March, 2018
  • From: Billings, Montana
Posted by montanaphil on Sunday, August 12, 2018 11:04 PM

good idea. Years ago with the real deal auto finish higher pressure was better, but with this new stuff it may go bad from to much push.

I too can screw up right or left or top or bottom. I am 72 and been at this 50 years, you would think by now I would have it figured out.

Thanks for the thoughts

  • Member since
    March, 2018
  • From: Billings, Montana
Posted by montanaphil on Sunday, August 12, 2018 11:15 PM

No thinner, just water thin out of the spary can to the jar. Mixing systems is not something I do. It is as thin as my experience with lacquer for many years of 1:1 cars, bikes, cycles, and rc cars. I can not run 60#'s with my pump, 40 is it. Oddly enough I hav done many projects with Duplicolor and the finish is always very good. This is the first of 6 different cans of thier product to give this finish. I do know where to start, use a diffent paint product. And I did do a test shot before the project was color coated, I find the spoon thing to be a bit small for testing to a 1/12 scale body. Nothing is lost I just will change paint suppliers and be good to go. I learned 40 years ago to always run a sample before a final paint scheme is applied. Back then you could buy real lacquer and thinner from Ditzler and it was near perfect every time. Time changes all things I guess.

Phil

  • Member since
    July, 2018
Posted by OldTallDad on Monday, August 13, 2018 6:43 AM

montanaphil

...I find the spoon thing to be a bit small for testing to a 1/12 scale body.

Phil

 

 
Try spraying a plastic soda or water bottle instead of a spoon. Regarding the issue with the paint, are you allowing adequate time for the decanted paint to "gas out" before spraying it in your airbrush?

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