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Drying/Heat Box Temperature?

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  • Member since
    February, 2018
Drying/Heat Box Temperature?
Posted by zsoderquist on Thursday, February 08, 2018 7:42 AM

I am designing and building a forced air drying / heat box for drying and curing paint.

Drying / Heat Box

I am playing with different heat lamps/bulbs and trying to determine what temperature range I should be shooting for to help speed the drying and curing but not worry about damaging the model. 

Suggestions?

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, February 08, 2018 9:10 AM

A lot of guys use food dehydrators for drying or curing their paint jobs. Perhaps you could find out what temperatures they use? I don't have room for a dehydrator and use a method that I've used since the mid-50's. Yep, it's called air-drying and I found that it works really well for me.

High octane

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, February 08, 2018 10:50 AM

The temperature at which damage could occur to the plastic may vary with different kits, but the upper limit is generally accepted to be in the 120-125 degree F range. Personally I keep my dehydrator around 100 degrees , and never let it exceed 110 degrees to maintain a safety margin. As far as paint drying is concerned, I don't see any reason to exceed these temperatures.

There are others with better knowledge on this topic who may have more concrete information for you.

Here's a tip before you learn the hard way; if you mount a car body to an apparatus such as a bent coat hanger for painting, or any device that holds the body by spring tension, do not subject the freshly painted body to heat whilst it is still on the holder. The plastic will soften when heated, and the spring force from the holder with distort the body, and the heat will cause it to take a set, permently warping the body.

Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
       - Antoine de Saint-Exepury

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, February 08, 2018 1:23 PM

Wow Trevor, I've never heard of that before of the body distorting, but it makes good sense to me. Thanks, even though I only air-dry my bodies that is a great tip and hopefully I can pass it on to some club members.

High octane

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Thursday, February 08, 2018 6:54 PM

Years ago while staying in digs I tried the oven at LOW temps.....Guess the results..Laugh

 

Nigel.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by zsoderquist on Friday, February 09, 2018 6:13 AM

Thank you all for your advise. Trevor, would never of thought of that but makes sense. After my latest tweaks, I can keep it at a constant 95 degrees and 10% humidity. I think that will work for me.

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Kannsas City
Posted by 93slammer on Saturday, February 10, 2018 11:28 PM

Don't use a heat lamp bulb or flood lamp bulb. It will melt the plastic.

I ruined a body by using a flood lamp bulb in my spray booth.

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by zsoderquist on Sunday, February 11, 2018 12:32 AM

The heat lamp bulb is in a different chamber and the heat is transferred to the model drying area via a fan. Right now I have the temperature at about 90-95F in the drying area with this setup.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Monday, February 12, 2018 7:51 PM

zsoderquist

I am designing and building a forced air drying / heat box for drying and curing paint.

Drying / Heat Box

I am playing with different heat lamps/bulbs and trying to determine what temperature range I should be shooting for to help speed the drying and curing but not worry about damaging the model. 

Suggestions?

 

For starters, I strongly suggest NOT using any sort of direct heat applications, such as heat lamps shining directly on your model, as those can quickly overheat the plastic, leading to warping, even melting them down, even if the ambient air temperature within such a box is within safe limits.

Why not just consider what most all of us use for force-drying paint jobs, that being a common, ordinary food dehydrator?  I use an Oster Food Dehydrator that I bought at Walmart in 2011, paid about $30 for it--it works just fine, never a problem with overheating as it's factory set at 120F, and has forced air circulation, and is vented so that it never overheats.  I cannot believe that these are very much more expensive now than 7 yrs ago.  

To my mind, this beats all the work, worry, and potential for errors in trying to make one on my own.

Art Anderson

  • Member since
    February, 2018
Posted by lacquer-lover on Thursday, March 01, 2018 6:27 AM

Use the lowest heat possible (98 on my unit) its the constant airflow more than the temperature that fires the paint.

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