SEARCH SCALEAUTOMAG.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Spray Gun vs Airbrush vs Spraycan

1276 views
11 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    August, 2017
Spray Gun vs Airbrush vs Spraycan
Posted by japan617 on Thursday, August 03, 2017 1:49 PM

Hi all,

I was watching Paul Budzik's youtube video on spray guns and large airbrushes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6gI9ljJsdo and the gist of the video is that airbrushes aren't suitable for high gloss finishes and modelers would be better off with a high volume low pressure spray gun/compressor setup. Is Paul correct or can high gloss finishes still be achieved with regular airbrushes? If given the choice between an airbrush or spraycans, which one would be preferred for that holy shine? Appreciate the input.

 

Thanks,

 

James 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, August 03, 2017 3:03 PM

James, While I haven't seen the video you've mentioned, I myself prefer spraying from "rattlecans" as I really like the "shake 'n spray" method of painting. NO mixing, no thinning, no needle changes, no noise from the compressor, no pressure changing, no moisture in the lines, no cleanup. While I've had a compressor and a couple of air brushes, I hardly ever used them and found that I can do fade and two tone paint jobs pretty good with a spray can. I did sell my air-brushes and compressor last year at a low price just to get rid of them.

There are MANY modelers besides car modelers that use air-brushes and they can get some excellent results with them. There is also the fact that the users of air-brushes have a larger variety of colors than out of a spray can, however I've never seemed to have run out of different colors to spray as of yet.

You'll have to try them both, maybe try using a friends air-brush and make up your own mind in which direction you'd like to go in.

High octane

  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Podunkville USA
Posted by gloozalot on Thursday, August 03, 2017 6:05 PM

James, I agree with HO.  I use both airbursh and rattle bombs.  Some things I do work better with the airbrush and lots of times I just paint with the rattle bomb.  I know modelers that can get that super finish with cans and some with the airbrush.  I would say try em both and see what you like best.  I like to use both myself.

To Err is human, to blame it on someone else shows management potential.  

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by big-e-models on Thursday, August 03, 2017 7:07 PM

 Hey James I have used spray cans in your brushes for years, and I prefer an airbrush the badger 350 I find is the most versatile and easiest to use. The reason why I went to an airbrush  is I could mix a variety of paint colours I otherwise wouldn't be able to get out of a spray can. Another reason I found spray cans to be very inconsistent especially clearcoat. If you look at my post on the scale auto forum most of my models have been sprayed with an airbrush and clear  coated with commercial floor wax the process does take a little longer than the spray can put the finish is immediate and you can work with it right away other than having to wait for the paint to dry for days 

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, August 03, 2017 7:10 PM

I have a hard time getting a high gloss finish regardless of what type of device I'm using to spray it on.

That's where polishing comes in.

I've always thought that regardless of how shiny the paint is initially, the finish will benefit greatly from polishing anyway.

I've found that a shiny paint job straight from the can or airbrush can often be too shiny giving you an almost "candy" like appearance or making it look "toy like".

polishing will give you a more realistic looking "luster" to the finish.

closer to a 1:1 paint job.

I use rattle cans & an airbrush depending on whether or not I'm using a solid color or metallic paint.

Most rattle can metallics are out of scale for 1/25th & can many times give you the "bass boat" affect.

So for a basic color like black, red or white I'll use a rattle can just for the ease of it.

For metallic paint jobs I use an airbrush & MCW paints.

I'm a little excited because I recently purchased a "Creos Mr. Procon Boy" trigger type air brush That I'm hoping will work well for painting bodies.

It's a trigger air brush with a fan spray tip & a higher paint volume capacity that should be just what the doctor ordered.

Spraying with a regular air brush can be a little tricky because of the narrow spray pattern & lower volume.

I'm looking forward to trying it.

 

Steve

 

GSI Creos Mr. Procon Boy LWA Trigger Type Airbrush, 0.5mm

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, August 03, 2017 9:00 PM

THIS!

Goofy62
I've always thought that regardless of how shiny the paint is initially, the finish will benefit greatly from polishing anyway.

All I really concern myself with is just getting the paint on there in proper quantity and reasonable smoothness.

Steve; I'm interested in hearing about the results with the new airbrush.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, August 03, 2017 9:22 PM

japan617

Hi all,

I was watching Paul Budzik's youtube video on spray guns and large airbrushes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6gI9ljJsdo and the gist of the video is that airbrushes aren't suitable for high gloss finishes and modelers would be better off with a high volume low pressure spray gun/compressor setup. Is Paul correct or can high gloss finishes still be achieved with regular airbrushes? If given the choice between an airbrush or spraycans, which one would be preferred for that holy shine? Appreciate the input.

 

Thanks,

 

James 

 

James this is a really good question, but you'll get a lot of different answers.

To me, so much depends on personal choice, talant, skills and a need to try new things and get better.

I own everything you mentioned and what I use usually comes down to what I want to accomplish in the look of the finished car.

I build a lot of different styles but I just love show style customs and "tail-draggers. On those I use 2 stage urethanes that i hand mix and coat with a catalyzed clear shot through an air brush at around 65 p.s.I. Yeah I know I get a lot of "Flack" about that, but hey it works for me.

Anyway, I like all the options you mention, and have had good success with them all over the years, so whatever you decide, have fun with it and don't stress. It's just a hobby meant to enjoy.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, August 10, 2017 10:52 PM

I had to spray a convertible boot today, so I stepped out of the house with the part and a spray can, and Presto it was done.

High octane

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:09 AM

A good shine doesn't come from a can or an airbrush. It comes from your own two hands. Get yourself a Tamiya polishing set: Course, Fine and Finish. It will change your life! I used to only polish out "serious" models. But, with the Tamiya compounds, I now polish every model. It is that easy. Just sand with 2000 (or finer if you wish) grit, polish with the three compounds and you're done.

 

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by japan617 on Thursday, September 28, 2017 4:30 PM

Thanks for the input all, I've been trying to shoot Mr. Color lacquer paints through my airbrushes (Grex XGI with a .3mm needle, Badger Patriot 105 with a .76mm needle). I can lay down smooth mist coats of surfacer, and color coats, but getting that orange peel free wet coat shine has eluded me so far. Have a fan tip for the Grex on the way which is supposed to change the pattern to make it wider, which should make it easier to overlap the paint to maintain the wet edge. Fingers crossed.

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, September 28, 2017 8:12 PM

If you're getting "orange peel" you may be spraying too far away from your subject. Spray closer and faster.

High octane

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by japan617 on Friday, September 29, 2017 4:46 PM

That's the big question I'm trying to figure out. Orange peel is caused by paint drying too fast. It could be drying prematurely on it's way to the model (sprayed too far, not thinned enough, too high PSI which atomizes the paint droplets resulting in more exposure to air), or the paint could be drying too quickly after it has landed on the surface and not leveling out enough... Continuing on that, regarding wet coats.. Is overlapping previous coats and loading up as much paint as possible before the paint runs the key to avoiding orange peel? PS: appreciate all the insight I've received from you all, just have more questions then responses right now.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT