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Metalizers and sanding questions

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  • Member since
    July, 2017
Metalizers and sanding questions
Posted by kcrist84 on Saturday, July 08, 2017 9:04 AM

Sorry for the 2 part question but figures I could kill 2 birds...

1) I have read that when using metalizers that you need to use them on bare plastic for best look. But I found an article today that states it is better to use over some sort of gloss primer or gloss coat of paint for better shine. Is this true. Am going to test but wanted other opinions.

2) when sanding, how do you know when to move on to the next grit? I have tried going through the progression but my end result is dull ugliness. Don't know if I'm not spending enough time on each grit. 

Thanks for any pointers. 

  • Member since
    July, 2016
  • From: Podunk, Illinois
Posted by smhardesty on Saturday, July 08, 2017 12:09 PM

I'm just coming back to the hobby after about 50 years or so. Your question is one I have had too. I've been doing a lot of experimenting of the past year, trying to learn the best way to do each of several tasks and the polishing thing is one I've really had to play around with. Now, understand, after a year I still haven't completed my first build, so take what I'm about to say with a grain of salt.

What I have found is that you should see a very clear & distinct difference between what you have polished and what you haven't before you're ready to move on to the next step. By that, I mean that if you're polishing on the trunk, keep checking between the trunk and the top of the car. You should easily be able to see a difference between the two. When you have all of the car done except the last area (the top in this example) you'll be able to compare the rest of the car to the top and then you'll be looking for the top to look just like everything else. Then you're ready to move to the next step in polishing and you'll just duplicate this procedure.

I'm sure some of the other guys will offer their advice and you should definitely take note of what they say. Some of these guys have been building models for 50 years non-stop. When compared to me they know a whole lot better what the best thing to do is.

The one thing I know is that when polishing, it does take a while to do, so don't rush, but you also have to be careful not to apply to much pressure or polish too long. It's kind of an art in itself. I've practiced on plastic spoons and knives, and also on the bodies of a couple of kits I ended up with that I didn't really want. (gifts from others)

Steve

On the bench - Right now, a mess.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Moparlover64 on Sunday, July 09, 2017 11:40 AM

A tedious process but well worth the efforts I used novus system but they have newer processes now but no vus still work as for me

Moparlover64

  • Member since
    July, 2016
  • From: Podunk, Illinois
Posted by smhardesty on Sunday, July 09, 2017 2:42 PM

kcrist84, my apologies for rattling on about polishing. I somehow saw your question about "sanding" and thought "polishing". That's what happens when a heavily medicated old man gets on a computer.

As for sanding, I'm being mentored by a couple of guys, one of which has been advising that unless a mistake is made, or a problem arises, there is no need to sand. I'm approaching my practice attempts that way. 

Steve

On the bench - Right now, a mess.

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by kcrist84 on Sunday, July 09, 2017 3:22 PM

Its OK smhardesty, that's what I was wanting...polishing. Not real sure why I called it sanding. 

What do you use to polish? Someone else mentioned the novus, not sure what that is.

Thanks

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 9:53 AM

kcrist84
1) I have read that when using metalizers that you need to use them on bare plastic for best look. But I found an article today that states it is better to use over some sort of gloss primer or gloss coat of paint for better shine. Is this true. Am going to test but wanted other opinions.

Assuming you are referring to Model Master Metalizers; They can be applied over pretty much any surface. They will highlight and magnify any surface imperfection, but look great on an unblemished surface, which is why some may recommend applying over bare plastic. I would assume that this is also why some may have suggested to apply over gloss paint. If applied over flat paint or primer, the surface texture will not be hidden by application of the metalizer paint. These paints definately look best over a smooth or polished surface.

Keep in mind that most (all?) metalizers have a matt finish regardless of the surface they are applied over. These are not shiney paints. They mimic natural metal surfaces. Some metalizers are called 'buffing metalizers', which can be buffed with a soft cloth after they dry. This creates a nice 'machined' or even 'lightly polished', but the surface stiull wouldn't be called glossy.

The Model Master Metalizers are great paints and can be very effective, but good surface preperation is a must for best appearance.

kcrist84
2) when sanding, how do you know when to move on to the next grit? I have tried going through the progression but my end result is dull ugliness. Don't know if I'm not spending enough time on each grit.

Experience is your best friend here. Over time you will develope a feel for when it is time to move up a grit. This will be a combination of feel and appearance. When you get to the finer grits, check you work with magnification. If there are bigger scratches left behind, then not enough time was spent with the courser grits. However, you want to spend as little time as possible with the courser grits because they remove so much paint material quite quickly (unless you are polishing some worked plastic to prepare for metalizer, in which case spend as much time with each grit as you like). It really is a delicate balance that requires experience to master.

Get some Micro Mesh pads and some Novus or Tamiya polishes and dig in. Practice on some scrap bodies and the experience will come.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    July, 2017
Posted by kcrist84 on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 9:59 AM

Thanks for the tips. I am actually ordering some micro mesh and novus today. 

  • Member since
    July, 2016
  • From: Podunk, Illinois
Posted by smhardesty on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 2:02 PM

kcrist84

What do you use to polish? Someone else mentioned the novus, not sure what that is.

Thanks

I've got the Novus polish. I'm not very good at it yet. Another reason I haven't finished my first build. I'd really like to be able to get a nice, smooth finish before I start in on a kit I've spent time building.

Steve

On the bench - Right now, a mess.

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