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When I spray Laquer it dries like crinklecoat

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  • Member since
    May, 2017
When I spray Laquer it dries like crinklecoat
Posted by Sterling Acterra driver on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 2:07 PM

It has been a lot of years since I have used a spray-bomb to paint a model. I have not had a chance to setup a spray booth and air supply for my air brush. So I have done some body work on the truck and when I spray the Tamiya TS89 laquer it lays down good untiL it starts drying then it starts crinkling up like crinkle coat. I have no idea about spraying the paint availible these days and I have not figured out what to thin it with, I am used to spraying acrylic enamel thinned with model master air brush thinner which is impossible to find these days. I have had trouble finding a good supplyer for paint. I think everything now is water based and I have no idea what to thin it with to use my air brush! HELP i did not expect to have this much trouble getting started building models again!

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 6:31 PM

Are you priming, & if so, how much?

Lacquers are tough on plastic.

There are a completely different set of rules when spraying lacquer.

Primer is essential, & plenty of it.

The phenomena you are describing sounds like a condition that is refered to as "crazing".

The paint is too "hot" & it etches the plastic making the paint look wrinkled.

The sad part is, if this is the case, it's not just a bad paint job, you've actually ruined the plastic.

Lacquer paints like Testors are very mild & will generally not destroy the plastic surface, but even with them, I would not attempt to spray them without primer.

Tamiya lacquers are a bit "hotter" & automotive lacquers hotter still.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    May, 2017
Posted by Bugman9317 on Tuesday, May 09, 2017 7:20 PM

I am glad I read this. My next build I am going to use Lacquer so I will make sure I prime it well.

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 12:24 PM

Tamiya paint is supposed to be safe to spray over bare styrene. I've never done it myself. But, I've seen others do it without problems. It kinda sounds like you may be spraying the paint too wet. Lacquer is completely different than acrylic enamel and it doesn't take nearly as much paint to cover. It's better to use light quick sprays versus wet coats like you would with the acrylic enamel. I usually spray 3-4 light coats with any lacquer. I also primer everything no matter what kind of paint is going over it. It makes all the difference when it comes time to paint.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 6:24 PM

Plowboy

Tamiya paint is supposed to be safe to spray over bare styrene. I've never done it myself. But, I've seen others do it without problems. It kinda sounds like you may be spraying the paint too wet. Lacquer is completely different than acrylic enamel and it doesn't take nearly as much paint to cover. It's better to use light quick sprays versus wet coats like you would with the acrylic enamel. I usually spray 3-4 light coats with any lacquer. I also primer everything no matter what kind of paint is going over it. It makes all the difference when it comes time to paint.

 

 

Testors Lacquers are supposed to be safe for plastic as well.

Normally that is true, especially with their clear lacquers.

But I have had Testors lacquer craze, even with primer.

I used Testors "Evening Orchid" once on a Revell '58 Chevy with a coat of Testors white primer underneath and it still crazed mildly.

Personally, I would always use primer with any lacquer paint.

Just a good habit to get into to save issues down the road.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, May 11, 2017 7:18 PM

Sterling Acterra driver

It has been a lot of years since I have used a spray-bomb to paint a model. I have not had a chance to setup a spray booth and air supply for my air brush. So I have done some body work on the truck and when I spray the Tamiya TS89 laquer it lays down good untiL it starts drying then it starts crinkling up like crinkle coat. I have no idea about spraying the paint availible these days and I have not figured out what to thin it with, I am used to spraying acrylic enamel thinned with model master air brush thinner which is impossible to find these days. I have had trouble finding a good supplyer for paint. I think everything now is water based and I have no idea what to thin it with to use my air brush! HELP i did not expect to have this much trouble getting started building models again!

 

Hi there.

The "Crinkling" you mention describes "2" types of problem finishes.

You mentioned doing body work but didnn't mention using a "Primer".

If you sprayed directly onto the plastic without primer, with a "Hot" lacquer, or the plastic is sensitive to any lacquers as some are, the paint you sprayed caused a "crazing" of the plastic where the solvent  in the paint attacked the plastic - very common.

The second type of attacking is called "Alligatoring", where paint attackes paint. That's why I mentioned primer, because top coat paints will attack certain primers because of compatibility issues. Timing and painting conditions can be huge considerations also.

Painting is more of a science than many give it credit for, and takes time and experimenting and much practice to develope a painting technique that is repeatable, and your satisfied with.

If it were me, I would step away from this project for a bit and do some experimenting and practicing to develope some skills that will change your results, and help you feel comfortable in your next attempt Thumbs Up, and be successful Big Smile.

Love Velocity channel, Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions 

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2017
Posted by Sterling Acterra driver on Saturday, May 13, 2017 4:12 PM
That is what is weird, I have sprayed Laquer out of my air brush and have never had any trouble. It did not etch the plastic but the only way I was able to remove the paint that crinkled was to spray the same Laquer in a very wet coat then wipe it down with an auto body paint friendly tack cloth. There is a lot of fine detail on this model, it is a Tamiya 1/14 scale truck tractor but the detailing is incredible. The paint I am using is the primer and paint that Tamiya suggest for this kit. I decided to get into some scale RC stuff and this truck is my first build. It has been 10 or 12 years since I have built any kits which is sad because I have over 200 1/24 & 1/25 scale kits waiting to be built. Went through a bunch of health issues and quit building kits, just now starting back on building but have never had Laquer lay down nice and flat then as it dried krinkle up without damaging the styrene.
  • Member since
    May, 2017
Posted by Sterling Acterra driver on Wednesday, May 31, 2017 3:04 PM

So my next problem is removing the paint without damaging fine detals, I actually removed a lot by spraying a hotter ( polycarbonate ) paint and wiping it down with a paper towel but this gets expansive quick. Is there a safe way to remove the Laquer that I had shot and came out bad without destroying the fine details on the styrene body? And guidance on this would be appreciated. This being a 1/14 scale truck its not easy to just replace the body and sleeper.  I have decided spray bombs are not for me, buying the wood to build a spray booth and breaking my air brushes out!. I had actually gotten a nice even coat and the truck was looking good, then I heard the whining of a blower next door and dust rose into a cloud and dusted the whole truck cab and sleeper. Not mY best day,

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, May 31, 2017 8:15 PM

That sucks! Sorry to hear that. I have tried several things to remove Tamiya lacquer, including Castrol Super Clean and Easy-Off oven cleaner, but only a soak in a tub of brake fluid worked. It took a couple of days but I was able to remove all traces of paint. I have heard soaking in 91% or 99% isopropyl alcohol works to remove lacquer as well, but haven't tried it. Something there might work for the paint you are using.

I don't know how any of these will react with resin, but I suspect some of them will react badly, just in case your project is resin. Also, after stripping keep an eye on any body putty in case it has gone wierd.

Que the Vikings: "Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam ..."

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Hamptonville, NC
Posted by TarheelRick on Thursday, June 01, 2017 3:43 AM

You did not mention whether this truck body is resin or polystyrene.  I have had pretty good luck removing lacquer using 91% isopropyl alcohol (you can get 4 pint bottles at Sam's very resonably).  If the body is resin stay clear of brake fluid, you WILL have to get another body.

I build models because I can't afford the real thing!

  • Member since
    January, 2018
  • From: Gastonia, NC
Posted by DRay1656 on Thursday, February 15, 2018 3:55 PM

I just finished a model with Testors Purple-Licious Lacquer and it crazed over almost immediately! My first mistake was not using primer. My second mistake was I think I sprayed it on too thick. I tried soaking it for 3 days in Purple Power and the paint never budged so it is now soaking in the oven cleaner. Don't know yet how that will work out but if it doesn't then I will be heading to Sams for the alcohol!!!

  • Member since
    March, 2018
  • From: Billings, Montana
Posted by montanaphil on Monday, March 12, 2018 10:46 PM

I have used lacquer for many years. Back when, I bought it at automotive supply houses. Now it is hard to get, enviroment issues.

I now use Dulpli-color and decant the spray cans to jars and airbursh. One spray can will paint several 1/24 bodies. This paint is lacquer. The most important thing is the primer as all have stated. The last 2 cars I shot with Duplicolor I primered with Tamiya fine primer gray. 1-2 good coats, sand the bumps and dirt then another good coat. I let it dry at least 24 hours. Then the color coat. I do it different, I shot wet coats. Duplicolor is very thin and spays very fast and flashes off fast. Very hard to make run. Wet coats level out better than thin in my world. The wet coats flow and level. The metalic colors spray really good. Smooth and a very nice shine. I find light coats tend to orange peel and get very rough. But what ever works for you is the best way to apply paint.

After color and a good dry, clean any odd dirt or bumps with way fine paper and then a couple of coats wet of Duplicolor gloss clear. This works very well for me. Good part Duplicolor spray cans are about $8 at most good auto stores and comes in a wide array of colors and you can match factory issue colors. I bought a quart of clear and it is ready to spray right out of the can.

  • Member since
    January, 2018
  • From: Gastonia, NC
Posted by DRay1656 on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 9:36 AM

I have had a lot of problems with crazing also and have found that with lacquer paint the best thing to remove it is 91% alcohol. The only problem is you have to keep a close watch on your model because the alcohol will start to soften the plastic if left in too long. In my experimenting I have found that if I leave the model in for about an hour or so, that is enough to loosen the lacquer to be able to take it off. Hope this helps!

6
  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: eBay until I build my own site!
Posted by 6 on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 1:48 PM

Experienced painters have gotten away with going directly on plastic by doing very light dustings for the first two coats and letting it dry completely before moving forward.  I've got in the habit of dusting my first coat no matter what.  Honestly, I never painted straight on plastic and love the concept for a look that's not thick. But instead, I seek out a very thin primer and I even dust that on for the first coat.  Having said all of this, there's a risk of getting a powdery texture with dusting if the brush or can is too far from the target.  It's a simple matter of trial and error.  I have a group of kits that are my least favorite that I'll use to sharpen my skills once I get back into it more aggressively.  Once I feel I've got my technique back, I'll go to my more coveted kits.

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