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Chrome Grills

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  • Member since
    January, 2016
Chrome Grills
Posted by Arragonis on Saturday, April 08, 2017 1:29 PM

I'm currently building a few AMT models with chrome grills - I've seen pics of them with black embedded inside to make it look like a real grill. Is there a particular technique to do this ?

Thanks

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, April 08, 2017 3:47 PM

It's what is referred to as a "wash".

Basically you flow some sort of black paint, usually an acrylic or enamel, into the recesses & then clean the paint from the high points revealing the chrome "grille".

I use an acrylic craft paint because it will not damage any kind of chrome & it's easiest to remove after it has dried a bit.

You can remove it with a cloth or Q-tip dampened with regular old tap water.

You can use an enamel paint, but it needs to be removed with a thinner.

I get a little squeemish about applying any sort of chemical to the chrome, so I feel more comfortable using the acrylic paint.

I have had thinner remove some of the chrome on pieces in the past.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, April 08, 2017 10:45 PM

Yup, everything Steve said above. You will want to thin the paint quite a bit to make the wash, maybe in the area of 5:1 give or take for a grill or as much as 10:1 for wheels and engines, chassis parts , etc. Try your mixture on scrap parts first to be sure you are happy with the mix, and get a feel for how the wash is working.

There is also a Tamiya product called Panel Line Accent Color which is a pre-thinned enamel black wash that is popular with aircraft builders. But as Steve said, enamel solvents on chrome is quite risky.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, April 09, 2017 12:18 AM

Bainford

Yup, everything Steve said above. You will want to thin the paint quite a bit to make the wash, maybe in the area of 5:1 give or take for a grill or as much as 10:1 for wheels and engines, chassis parts , etc. Try your mixture on scrap parts first to be sure you are happy with the mix, and get a feel for how the wash is working.

There is also a Tamiya product called Panel Line Accent Color which is a pre-thinned enamel black wash that is popular with aircraft builders. But as Steve said, enamel solvents on chrome is quite risky.

 

With the acrylic "craft paints" like Ceramcoat, very little thinning is necessary.

As a matter of fact, it will give you a better results the less it is thinned.

It tends to lose it's coverage capabilities with too much thinning so I usually only thin to about the consistency of heavy cream.

Probably about 1 part water to 2 parts paint depending on the beginning consistency.

 

Steve

 

DSCN4352

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Sunday, April 09, 2017 1:13 AM

Goofy62
With the acrylic "craft paints" like Ceramcoat, very little thinning is necessary.

I'll check that stuff out. Lately I've been becoming less satisfied with my usual 'go to' wash of Tamiya semi-gloss black and alcohol. I have been contemplating alternatives.

What do you use to thin it?

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Sunday, April 09, 2017 8:25 AM

Whenever possible (which is most times), I open my grilles so that they are see through. I start by grinding the back side with a Dremel until I can see the grille through the plastic. Then I use a file or 220 grit sandpaper to finish it up. Once it's open, I sand with 400 and 600 until smooth, then paint. It's more time consuming than a simple blackwash. But, it's 10x more realistic looking.

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2016
Posted by Arragonis on Sunday, April 09, 2017 1:09 PM

Thanks all for the replies! I'll give the wash approach a go.

A.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, April 09, 2017 1:25 PM

Bainford

 

 
Goofy62
With the acrylic "craft paints" like Ceramcoat, very little thinning is necessary.

 

 

What do you use to thin it?

 

Just plain old water.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, April 09, 2017 1:27 PM

Plowboy

Whenever possible (which is most times), I open my grilles so that they are see through. I start by grinding the back side with a Dremel until I can see the grille through the plastic. Then I use a file or 220 grit sandpaper to finish it up. Once it's open, I sand with 400 and 600 until smooth, then paint. It's more time consuming than a simple blackwash. But, it's 10x more realistic looking.

 

 

 

I know some guys like to use this approach, but in many cases, with a fine grille like the '61 Ford grille depicted, this would be nearly impossible.

 

Steve

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