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Dealing with color bleed-through from colored plastics.

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  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Oregon: Tree Country.
Dealing with color bleed-through from colored plastics.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 11, 2017 9:37 AM

I hate when a nice kit comes out , but it's molded in a colored plastic. I have an orange kit I'm about to do, and I know the orange pigment will bleed through into what ever color I choose..

I have found accidently years ago, that if I primer the plastic pieces, the primer will absorb a majority of the color pigment that normally bleeds into your paint color, and you can tell if the pigment has bled because the color of the primer changes. Then I put the pieces in my favorite paint stripper, I like brake fluid, long enough for the primer to be removed along with the pigment. I usually do this twice to make sure all the pigment is gone.

The second time of doing this will also tell you if their is still pigment there because, as I said before the pigment always goes into the primer and changes the primers color slightly like the first time, but it should be much lighter or hopefully no pigment at all.

Some guys will use a different technique by priming the body and then using a silver spray paint as a barrier coat to stop the bleed through, which works, but that tends to be too much paint and the details are affected.

Anyway, just another option to deal with these sometimes "pesky issues".

Colored plastic always add's another demension to trouble shooting.

If there are other idea's please post them here as we all need as many options as possible.

Have fun all Big Smile.

 

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I bought all the model stuff I wanted for Christmas because no one else would spend that much on me Laugh Laugh

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Saturday, March 11, 2017 11:29 AM

When working with colored plastic bodies I always use Tamiya Silver Leaf FIRST, then primer, then my color coats and clear, and never had a problem with colored plastic bleed through. Try it and you'll see.

High octane

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Oregon: Tree Country.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, March 11, 2017 3:07 PM

High octane

When working with colored plastic bodies I always use Tamiya Silver Leaf FIRST, then primer, then my color coats and clear, and never had a problem with colored plastic bleed through. Try it and you'll see.

 

Great tip. THANKS Thumbs Up. I'll give it a try on my orange project coming up.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I bought all the model stuff I wanted for Christmas because no one else would spend that much on me Laugh Laugh

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Saturday, March 11, 2017 3:29 PM

I know that red bleeds like a stuck pig,but just for the record does any other colour bleed?

Got some Matchbox kits - cars and planes that are multi coloured,it ddid not bother me as a kid but nowadays it is a diff matter!

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, March 11, 2017 4:53 PM

Red pigment seems to bleed the worse, and that will include orange, pink, etc. Yellow seems to bleed through as well. I don't recall any problems with blue or black.

The hotter your paint, the worse the bleed through. I have little experience spraying acrylics, though. Do acrylics suffer bleed through?

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Saturday, March 11, 2017 5:06 PM

Bainford

Red pigment seems to bleed the worse, and that will include orange, pink, etc. Yellow seems to bleed through as well. I don't recall any problems with blue or black.

The hotter your paint, the worse the bleed through. I have little experience spraying acrylics, though. Do acrylics suffer bleed through?

 

Not being thick,just about to go to bed,but Why do certain colours bleed etc?

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
Posted by trainwreck on Saturday, March 11, 2017 7:02 PM

I find using automotive primer is best when trying to cover any coloured plastic, just use a couple light coats.  Trainwreck.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 1:53 PM

I understand that most don't have at the ready automotive types of products and they are expensive.... I do as I need them to run my busiess, I always use a sealer for all my paint work... years ago the brand I used only came in grey... now their is five colors that can be intermixed so the sealer colors are endless. It also comes in clear. Ive never had bleed throuh with these products

I'm curious because I don't know!!!! What is the theory or thought of why the silver acts as a barrier to bleed through

"RASS"    

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 5:33 PM

Silver and black...Same as Jim,why??Automobile

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:06 PM

WHY??.... Because I'm curious and would like to learn something!

Perhaps I should have directed this to Dave or Nick as they would have had an answer that would have been helpful!

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    August, 2014
Posted by trainwreck on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:26 PM

I think it's because of the "coverage" factor. I know when the silver( not chrome silver) is sprayed properly it doesn't run away from all the high spots, panel gaps & scripts, producing a more one note base coat. Trainwreck. 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Wednesday, March 15, 2017 6:48 PM

TW,

Now we are getting somewhere, sounds resonable!

Thank You!

"RASS" 

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

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