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ENAMEL PAINT AND LACQUER THINNER...

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  • Member since
    March, 2017
ENAMEL PAINT AND LACQUER THINNER...
Posted by The Outhouse Mouse on Tuesday, March 07, 2017 9:39 PM

When airbrushing with enamel paint and lacquer thinner, how long would you wait before assembly?

 

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, March 07, 2017 11:02 PM

I don't understand the question.

Has anyone tried using lacquer paint with lacquer thinner?

uh.....yes.

Now if your question is, is it advantageous to use lacquer thinner with "enamel", the answer is yes, it does dry faster.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 8:07 AM

Yup, what Steve said. I always thin my enamels with lacquer thinner when airbrushing.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: New York, Paris, Hamilton?
Posted by Chillyb1 on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 11:22 AM

The Outhouse Mouse

When airbrushing with enamel paint and lacquer thinner, how long would you wait before assembly?

 

 

While enamels thinned with lacquer thinner do dry fairly quickly when airbrushing, some colors take longer than others. How long you wait before assembling parts painted this way will depend on the color used, how much paint you shoot, and the size of the part. Little parts painted flat black in one shot can be handled shortly after spraying them; but a body painted with a couple wet coats of silver will appear never to dry. 

If they don't smell strongly of solvent, then parts are probably ready to handle for assembly. 

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Oregon: Tree Country.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 7:13 PM

From my own experience many years ago with this technique, it didn't go so well. After a few years the nicely finished paint started to turn dull and also began turning to a white powder on the surface. I was using enamel nail polish and lacquer thinner, so even though people are saying it works well, in a few years you may be terribly disappointed. I have stayed with like paints and thinners with great success, and no disappointments, even after many many years Thumbs Up

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I bought all the model stuff I wanted for Christmas because no one else would spend that much on me Laugh Laugh

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by The Outhouse Mouse on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 9:52 PM

Thanks!

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by The Outhouse Mouse on Wednesday, March 08, 2017 9:56 PM

Thanks Dave! I've never heard any mention of the downside to the enamel paint/lacquer thinner. I'm doing my due diligence now. Until I can afford an airbrush and compressor, I'll use spray cans. I tried for years to brush paint model car bodies with no success, so I gave that up. 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Thursday, March 09, 2017 12:13 AM

Treehugger Dave

From my own experience many years ago with this technique, it didn't go so well. After a few years the nicely finished paint started to turn dull and also began turning to a white powder on the surface. I was using enamel nail polish and lacquer thinner, so even though people are saying it works well, in a few years you may be terribly disappointed. I have stayed with like paints and thinners with great success, and no disappointments, even after many many years Thumbs Up

 

I totally subcribe to Daves recommendaion of staying with one system... Paint, reducers, clears etc... paint manufactueres design their products as a system. That's why they work when you adhere to their guidelines. I also agree that when thinning enamels with Lacquer thinner that you will eventually have a dulling and or chalking effect. However, I use this proceedure on a regular basis with no dulling or chalking.... the product I use though is Sign Painters One Shot which is a true oil based enamel. It's anyones guess whats in todays modeling paints. Does it work with modeling paints? Absolutely.... will it dull and chalk after time?.... Most likely.

 

Jimmy "RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Oregon: Tree Country.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, March 09, 2017 10:58 AM

There is an upside that I have used for the last sevaral years mixing enamels and lacquers using spray cans.

Over the years here on SA there was an understanding that you can't shoot lacquers over enamel, but several of us have developed our own technique of doning just that - shooting in my case clear coat lacquer over enamel - works every time with never a failure.

Thr reason I started doing it at times was because I liked the colors I found in certain enamel colors that no one else made. The enamel paints were good quality and my clear works great with everything (It's no longer made Sad).

It's a simple system that I use. After you've decided what paint type and color to use, do your prep work with the appropriate primer and primer color. Primer colors affect the base code shade and brightness.

I let my primers final coat dry a week and then I sand.

Next, using my spray can of enamel, I use a modified 1,2,3 painting system...Light, medium and wet with about 10 minutes between each coat for tacking.

After the final coat I let the base color dry for an hour but no more.

Then I begin my 1,2,3 steps of clear coating with the same drying time. I let it dry for 24 hours and then go straight to a med to wet coating stage for gloss. The body is mounted on a holder of my own design so once I'm done spraying I can continually rotate the body so the heavy clearing won't run. I rotate it about 10 minutes and then set it into the other part of the two-piece holder so it can continue to dry, and has a place to sit until the next day when i rub it out.

I never sand a paint job on models - ever, except for light dust particles. Even though the paint appears to be dry, it is still in a fluid state, and the special cloth I use and the compound for rubbing actually force the paint to smooth out and become glass-like with absolutely no orange-peel, and hardly any removal of the clear.

After a week the clear coat will harden and dull a tiny bit, and that's when I hit it with the same polishing compound and then polish with a super-fine 3m polishing product, then finish with a Meguiers polishing show car glaze. I use clothes made just for this. Inexpensive and makes all the difference.

This painting process I use, using lacquer over enamels I learned from my mother who was an artist many decades ago.

It's called painting wet-in-wet. The paints are combined while still wet and haven't changed chemically yet due to drying. You sort of "lacquerize" the enamel while still wet. The attacking we're used to hearing about or seeing, sometimes called "Alagatoring" is due to the paint drying to long and changing it's chemical make-up.

Actually for model cars,at least for me, over-drying is my worst enemy.

Having a fair knowledge of a paints chemical make-up has been one of my best tools for knowing how to combine all types of paint, along with proper understanding of dry times and conditions for painting your cars in along with proper paint prep proceedures.

When you master the wet -in - wet spray system it will be a huge game changer and open up doors to a whole new world of spray painting.

It may sound complicated, but if you spend the time needed to learn, after a while it becomes second nature, and with a dependable painting system you don't have to "Sweat" messing things up with a bad paint job, and you'll  have a finished model you can be very proud of Thumbs Up.

PS - Remember to always do samples first before doing it on a finished project.

 

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I bought all the model stuff I wanted for Christmas because no one else would spend that much on me Laugh Laugh

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Thursday, March 09, 2017 2:16 PM

Although my technique is a bit different than Dave's, I too have shot lacquer over enamel many times. It can be done no problem.... It's merely a exercise of trial and error. I haven't won every battle with this pocess but I'm well into the high 90%

"RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Oregon: Tree Country.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Thursday, March 09, 2017 4:06 PM

jwrass14

Although my technique is a bit different than Dave's, I too have shot lacquer over enamel many times. It can be done no problem.... It's merely a exercise of trial and error. I haven't won every battle with this pocess but I'm well into the high 90%

"RASS"

 

This is a Modelhaus 1957 Mercury resin kit I sprayed with Tamiya Pure White acrylic lacquer , and Krylon's Super Max paprika enamel clear coated with a PlastiKote clear acrylic lacquer.

3 different brand of paint all working in harmony. It just takes a few years of experience, some knowledge, and practice, practice, and more practice Thumbs Up.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions.

I bought all the model stuff I wanted for Christmas because no one else would spend that much on me Laugh Laugh

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by The Outhouse Mouse on Thursday, March 09, 2017 5:51 PM

Thanks gentlemen!

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Thursday, March 09, 2017 7:07 PM

Treehugger Dave

From my own experience many years ago with this technique, it didn't go so well. After a few years the nicely finished paint started to turn dull and also began turning to a white powder on the surface. I was using enamel nail polish and lacquer thinner, so even though people are saying it works well, in a few years you may be terribly disappointed. I have stayed with like paints and thinners with great success, and no disappointments, even after many many years Thumbs Up

 

Hi, Dave! I noticed that many nail polishes contain anti-fungals and other weird stuff that we may not want in our paint jobs for the long haul. Quite possibly it was the nail polish and not the thinner that was the culprit in your case. (A magnifying glass is usually needed to read the ingredients on the labels of those tiny bottles.) I think the unwanted chemicals in random nail polishes may explain why some guys swear by them while others swear at them. No argument with your explanations: you paint jobs speak for themselves. 

chucky

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Friday, March 10, 2017 4:49 AM

Dave,

As Always GREAT paint and input!

IMO the reason Dave has great success as a painter is he is a student of the craft...

Process, Proceedure and Knowledge of Materials = Great results....Every Picture Tells A Story. 

Jimmy "RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    February, 2017
Posted by JohnDB on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 4:16 PM

I have been using testers clear coat lacquer over testors enamel for a couple of years now and haven't had a problem. I have shot the lacquer over the enamel as soon as 20 minutes drying time in between the two coats. 2 years later the paint job still looks great. I have also shot Tamiya dullcote over testors enamel with no problems. I also use  testers  lacquer clear coat  over Tamiya paints . Hope this might help somebody.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by The Outhouse Mouse on Thursday, March 23, 2017 2:32 AM

Thanks gentlemen!

 

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