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Preveiw BMF...No Can Do!!!!

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  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:12 PM

A part like that could be much more easily done with Alclad or Spaz Stix chrome paint.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:31 PM

Goofy62

A part like that could be much more easily done with Alclad or Spaz Stix chrome paint.

 

Steve

 

True, However I like the ability to manipulate the texture and sheen to whatever I desire... The possibility's are endless.

I have used both of the products you mentioned...and not so much for me. I'd love to see some of your work. 

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 2:22 PM

I use Alclad occasionally for small parts.

Larger parts like yours I send out for chroming.

The only thing I could show would be something like the resin cast mirror on my '61 Buick.

It was finished with Alclad.

 

Steve

 

DSCN4503

 

 

DSCN4493

 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Saturday, February 18, 2017 5:35 PM

jwrass14

 

 

I've seen this countless times on various forums and have never understood why anyone would use a piece of foil an inch wide to cover trim that's only 3-4 mms wide. To me, it's so unnecessary and wasteful. I measure the trim width and length and add 2-3 mms to those measurements. But, that's just how I do it.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 6:12 PM

Plowboy

 

 
jwrass14

 

 

 

 

I've seen this countless times on various forums and have never understood why anyone would use a piece of foil an inch wide to cover trim that's only 3-4 mms wide. To me, it's so unnecessary and wasteful. I measure the trim width and length and add 2-3 mms to those measurements. But, that's just how I do it.

 

I don't measure mine but I would cut a piece about 1/6th that size for that piece of trim.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 10:39 PM

Steve,

I can't really get much of a visual on the mirror.

The build is spetacular!!!! Well done.

"RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Saturday, February 18, 2017 10:48 PM

Plowboy
 
jwrass14

 

 

 

 

I've seen this countless times on various forums and have never understood why anyone would use a piece of foil an inch wide to cover trim that's only 3-4 mms wide. To me, it's so unnecessary and wasteful. I measure the trim width and length and add 2-3 mms to those measurements. But, that's just how I do it.

 

You will see how it's done when I post the tutorial. It's a very very thin imitation Silver leaf, it is not a foil. IMO foil in any width is a waste.

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, February 19, 2017 12:59 AM

jwrass14

Steve,

I can't really get much of a visual on the mirror.

The build is spetacular!!!! Well done.

"RASS"

 

If you click on the photo, it will link you to my Fotki page with larger photos.

You can get a better look there.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Sunday, February 19, 2017 5:58 AM

I think I understand what you are doing here.  It is using smaller pieces that may go to waste.  I have always thought of BMF as an expensive item and therefore I don't want to waste it.  Using up the smaller pieces allows me to save a little money wherever I foil looks almost as one piece...at least to my 64 year old eyes.  

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985 

On my bench-Foose Ford FD100 Pickup; 1969 Plymouth Road Runner

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Sunday, February 19, 2017 1:23 PM

mrmike

I think I understand what you are doing here.  It is using smaller pieces that may go to waste.  I have always thought of BMF as an expensive item and therefore I don't want to waste it.  Using up the smaller pieces allows me to save a little money wherever I foil looks almost as one piece...at least to my 64 year old eyes.  

 

No mrmike, where he's going is saying that you should dump the foil altogether & use silver leaf.

I've seen others use this technique & have never really put a lot of stock in it.

Silver leaf requires an adhesive that has to be brushed on before the leaf goes down.

If you're hands are steady enough to brush adhesive on a body length side molding perfectly straight, this technique might work for you.

It's really no different than being able to brush moldings with a silver paint in a perfectly straight line which I'm sure every modeler, including myself, struggled with in the earlier days of modeling before foil came along.

Just like anything else, it all depends on what you become accustomed with.

I can do nearly anything in foil that I need to after years of working with it.

I've found almost zero limitations of BMF with some skill & patience over the years.

I understand that mr. "jwrass14" may think that this is the perfect method, but to insinuate that something "can't" be done with foil is just untrue.

We all have our methods & biases about them, but we should not think that something cannot be done because we might have difficulties with them.

If one can foil something like the tail light bezels on one of these old Johan Plymouths, you can do nearly anything with foil that you can with silver leaf.

 

Steve

 

1960 3

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Monday, February 20, 2017 6:48 AM

Steve,

I looked at your Foki account and you do indeed have some very nice builds!

I take issue (not personally) with your post with mrmike, Why would you oppose a alternate to foil? It makes no sense!

I mean just your opening statement to mrmike is petty bold.... How could you possibly know where I'm going or think.... Frankly that is ridiculous 

Why don't you let others decide what they might want to try. As far as putting stock in it, It's my guess that you have never tried it so how could you judge the process.

You more or less are calling me a lair......In your "I understand that mr jwrass14....." If any claim were more false it would be that BMF can conform to anything leaf can... It simply cannot........ FACT!

IMO your post was a uninformed opinion based on... Well your opinion. I posted a tutorial on said subject on the MCM forum.... Maybe that's what formed your opinion.

I mean really..... To make a uninformed claim is just not helpful to any forum... Forums are place to share information with others..... not to tear down others suggestions or methods. What other people do is way above my pay grade.... Just trying to share alternitives to people who who are open minded.

Yes it's true.... I beleive BMF is junk.... But it's just my opinion... It's neither right or wrong!

I'll let others decide whats the best method for them.

"RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Upstate New York
Posted by spencer1984 on Monday, February 20, 2017 7:08 AM

Plowboy

I've seen this countless times on various forums and have never understood why anyone would use a piece of foil an inch wide to cover trim that's only 3-4 mms wide. To me, it's so unnecessary and wasteful.

 
I've cut pieces like jwrass14 has shown here, and have also had people tell me I'm being wasteful. What I don't get, though, is why people assume I'm throwing out the extra pieces. Apply it like in the picture, trim it, and you already have the next piece ready to go with a clean edge and no backer. Wider strips are a lot easier to handle, especially getting them off the backer and into position. On a car that needs a lot of trim work, this method works great and there's very little waste.
Moderator
  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by jhaught on Monday, February 20, 2017 3:05 PM

BMF is not "junk." Thousands of modelers use it and do quite well with it. Let's cut out the name-calling and insinuations here.

If a product works for you, use it. If it doesn't, don't. But don't rip either of these methods. Do what you need to do, and to each his own.

Jim Haught

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Monday, February 20, 2017 3:32 PM

Goodness!

Such vitriol in the defense of a product that you hold in high regard.

Much akin to the reaction that one might expect from calling a product that someone else might hold in a similar respect as "junk" or "a waste".

You know, there is an old saying, "you can catch more flies with honey than vinegar".

I do not oppose the use of silver leaf as an alternative to foil, I was merely stating my view on why I will likely not use it & to give others an insight to my thinking on the subject.

Users of leaf seem to like to hold close to their vest the fact that a delicate application of adhesive is involved.

It's almost as if they don't want anybody to know that in order to be successful with it, you need to have a steady enough hand to apply the adhesive as straight as you would paint in the same instance.

You're correct, I have not tried it because I know that I would have issues with that particular task, as would many others.

If I'm wrong about that point, let me know.

When I said "I haven't put much stock in it", this was my reasoning.

As I said, I have no issues with using any alternatives to anything, but I do think that it is helpful if people see both sides of a coin.

When we post things like this, & I'm guilty of it as well, we tend to focus only on the "rosey" aspects & not the down side.

Just as there are disadvantages to foil, there are surely disadvantages to silver leaf.

You surely have to admit that.

And I still stand by my statement when I said:

"I can do nearly anything in foil that I need to after years of working with it."

"I have found almost zero limitations of BMF with some skill & patience over the years."

"But to insinuate that something can't be done with foil is just untrue."

You'll notice that there is no claim in those statements that foil can do anything that silver leaf can't, or vice versa.

It's just my experience.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Monday, February 20, 2017 7:57 PM

My Appologies to Steve, Jim and all who have visited this thread for inappropriate behavior!

I was merely trying to show a alternitive. I will still post the process and hopefully take some of the mystery out of the subject no holes barred.

It is true many who do custom painting, leafing, pinstriping hold their so called secrets close to their vest that is not my intent, myself and many of my peers try to share as much as we can as the craft has been slowing dying. We want to pass it on in an effort that others may have success in their endevors without the steep learning curve.

Peace............. Jimmy "RASS"     

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Monday, February 20, 2017 8:06 PM

I will also apologize if anything I said was offensive.

It was not my intent.

I believe a spirited discussion is always better than endless accolades.

Seriously Jim, I hope there are no hard feelings.

I have none.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Monday, February 20, 2017 9:09 PM

Steve,

It's all good... lets just move on with mutual respect.

I really did enjoy looking at your builds.... You are a very skilled builder!

Jimmy "RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by methuener on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 6:55 PM

I've been using BMF since it became available, and find it to be a wonderful modeling tool. The one thing I've always found troublesome is that I can not get it to be completely smooth. No matter how hard I burnish the stuff, some texture always remains. Am I doing someting wrong?

 

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 7:13 PM

methuener

I've been using BMF since it became available, and find it to be a wonderful modeling tool. The one thing I've always found troublesome is that I can not get it to be completely smooth. No matter how hard I burnish the stuff, some texture always remains. Am I doing someting wrong?

 

 

Try polishing the surface before applying the foil. If the surface under the foil is not perfectly smooth, the foil will not be smooth.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 10:52 AM

Bainford

Try polishing the surface before applying the foil. If the surface under the foil is not perfectly smooth, the foil will not be smooth.

 

 

THIS is THE most important step to achieving nice foil work whether one is using BMF, imitation silver leaf or even kitchen foil.

BMF, like anything else, can be frustrating at first. But, the only way to develop skills is to practice them. There are very few things that I can't do with BMF. This tube grille insert is scratch built with .020 styrene rod and sheet. It's quite fragile since the ends of the tubes are not connected to the surround. They're covered with BMF.

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 12:38 PM

Hey Gang,

After much thought......I will not be posting a leafing Tutorial on this forum.

My reason for this decision is based on the dust up I had here and my inappropriate behavior.....

I don't want to get in a debate of a valid process and have it lead to any misunderstandings.

I have posted the tutorial on various other forums and it can be seen there if you have any interest.

Respectfully Submitted,

 

Jimmy "RASS" 

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 1:35 PM

Goofy62

A part like that could be much more easily done with Alclad or Spaz Stix chrome paint.

 

Steve

 

Or even easier:  The new Molotow "Liquid Chrome" pens!   I've got a couple of those--the finish is simply amazing!  Literally, the stuff goes on more like an ink than a paint, and when dry (in just a few minutes, is amazingly mirror-like in finish, and reasonably durable as well!

Just Google "Molotow Liquid Chrome"--any number of links to suppliers will come up, even a couple here in the US.

Art Anderson

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