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Kandies 101: History Tips & Tricks

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  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Kandies 101: History Tips & Tricks
Posted by jwrass14 on Monday, February 13, 2017 11:43 PM

 

Kandies 101: History, Tips & Tricks

 

 

 

Kandies (Candy) The Chemical makeup of these finishes are toners/dyes and clear which give the colors their distinctive translucent/transparent look. Kandies are sprayed over a reflective base coat traditionally Metallic Gold or Silver. As the Kandy craze grew in the late 50 and early 60s in Southern California painters became more creative with their base coats. While many custom painters where using Silver and Gold bases.  A custom painter by the name of Larry Watson took the road less traveled and used a Copper Metallic base which set Kandy Apple Red off the charts with it’s warm hue. Watson became the man for all things Kandy.

 

Bases will change the feel of Kandy top coats; the five most common base coats are as follows:

 

Gold: A warm feel.

 

Silver: A Cool feel.

 

Copper: A Very Warm and rich feel………. My personal favorite.

 

White Pearl: A Warm and Cool feel depending on the hue of the Pearl.

 

Black Pearl: A Warm and Cool feel depending on the hue of the Pearl.

 

Kandies are by far one of the most difficult finishes to apply due to its transparent nature, if the paint is not applied in a uniform fashion the finish will have light and dark spots and tiger striping…. So how do we get an even finish? Follow along:

 

A) Slightly over reduce your Kandy color by about 10%.

 

B) Walking the Dog….. When we paint 1:1 we walk the length of the vehicle or object with no interruption while making each pass…. Same with a Model, spray the length of the body without interruption to avoid unevenness in the Kandy finish.

 

C) Applying medium wet coats with a 50% overlap, you want to bring the color on slow. With Kandies the Trick is to bring the color on slow…..Never apply full wet coats with Kandies.

 

D) Tip & Trick……After 3 to 4 coats of Kandy cut the Kandy mix 50% with clear, Maintain the same reduction and application procedures

 

E) Apply two coats of the cut Kandy mixture, this mixture will aid in an even and uniform finish.

 

F) Apply two full wet coats of clear over the Kandy for protection of the finish.

 

A typical Kandy job on a 1:1 is 5 to 7 coats which can lead to a fair amount of material thickness, if you are going to paint a Kandy finish you may want to consider deeper scribe lines at the panel definitions.

 

Contrary to the belief of more is better…. You know the saying “I put 20 coats of paint on and it looks Yada Yada” Not so with Kandies as they have what’s called a ceiling color, once you reach the ceiling color (5 to 7 coats) you stop applying color…. If you continue to add color after you reach the ceiling point you lose DOI Distinctness of image. Meaning: You start to lose the reflectivity of the base coat which in turn makes the color look dull and muddy.

 

Kandies can be applied over any base coat and are not limited to the traditional five. Experiment have fun with it….. The only limit is your imagination!

 

 

 

Peace….. Jimmy “RASS”

 

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 11:10 AM

Most helpful! Might I make a request? Do pearls next! I've always wondered about the history of pearls and I just love them. :)

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: arlington, tx.
Posted by rusty32rod on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 11:45 AM

     I appreciate you taking the time to share all this info with the rest of us. i know some of us may already know some of this, but it's nice to get a refresher and or a reminder about some of the "tricks of the trade" that we may forget on occasion. very helpful info and thanks again!

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 11:45 AM

Very interesting Jimmy,thanks for edmucating us.

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 11:46 AM

195X

Most helpful! Might I make a request? Do pearls next! I've always wondered about the history of pearls and I just love them. :)

 

deja vu.... Thats next

"RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 12:44 PM

Great tips, however we're not painting 1:1 cars here and there is quite a difference. Also some modelers seem to use too many coats of candy color on top of their base coat and lose the "candy effect."

High octane

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 8:01 PM

I follow my 1:1 techniques with modeling and I have no problems at all!

It's all proportional..... It's alot harder to do Kandy on 1:1 than A model... trust me! Perhaps you missed the part about ceiling level....and DOI, That would clearly define the "Candy Effect"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    April, 2017
Posted by FoxThre3 on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 4:00 PM

Good info to know.  Thanks. 

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