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De-SCRIBE- your technique.

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  • Member since
    January, 2017
De-SCRIBE- your technique.
Posted by 195X on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 11:48 AM

Are these title puns working at all?

I am about to map out two summer projects. One of them involves turning a 1966 Imperial into a four door. I have a '66 and a '65 body and my old method was to cut out the needed plastic from the spare and sand to shape. Backup the hole with sheet plastic and add the new doors.

I would rather learn to scribe better so I can (Lewis Black moment) STOP BUYING TWO CARS!

That's rational is it not? Isn't it reasonable? Well r&r has never been my strong suit and hack/sand/glue has, so I'd like to change that.

I've had good luck with small things like glove box door removal and adding rocker panel gaps. But really, how much work is involved scribing a line an 8th inch long?

So dig in here guys and tell me please. How do you get those door lines scribed in straight and at the right depth? Tools? Preparatory drink and or ritual? (keep it clean!) Big Smile

My favorite color is clear.

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 7:03 PM

195X,

For me scribing is something that you have to be in the zen mode.... slow and deliberate. I recently purchased a # 20124 5-piece probe set from Micro Mark which are essentially dential tools, however they are really much sharper than dential tools. I have been playing with them and they seem to work great. My go to has always been a number 11 blade pulling it backwards..... Again slow and deliberate... if your not in the zone forget it!

Jimmy "RASS"   

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:48 PM

You raise an interesting point. I've been using dental tools bought from Harbor Freight to practice with. The problem for me is patience. They aren't as sharp as other cutting or scribing tools and I run out of patience with the cutting. So that's one thing I definitely need to work on!

As for "the zone" I definitely know what you mean! Whatever aspect of the model I'm working on, if I'm not there I may as well not pick up the plastic!

My favorite color is clear.

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Hamptonville, NC
Posted by TarheelRick on Thursday, February 02, 2017 3:49 AM

I picked up a scriber made by Trumpeter from the local Hobbytown (remember those) a few years back.  Sorry, I can't find the picture on Photobucket.  I lay down my lines with three or four layers of masking tape and with EXTREME PATIENCE slowly scribe my lines.  One other person I know uses Dymo label tape, if I can find some I am going to give it a try.  I believe it will be more substantial than masking tape.

I build models because I can't afford the real thing!

  • Member since
    August, 2016
  • From: Wisconsin
Posted by jwrass14 on Thursday, February 02, 2017 7:12 AM

I've read about the dymo tape trick.... After pondering that, I got to thinking that thin brass or aluminium flashing would be a viable option... You could make a pattern with tracing paper of the opening you want to scribe transfer it to the metal, cut it out and attach it to the body with spray adhesive.... Just a thought!

Jimmy "RASS"

"I Have Flying Monkey's And I'm Not Afraid To Use Them"

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Thursday, February 02, 2017 8:13 AM

By far, my favorite tool to scribe with is a razor saw. It makes scribing in lines so much easier. Photo etch saw blades also work quite well. Around four years ago, I modified a dental pick that also works great on tight rounded corners. What I like about these three tools is that they will follow the line every pass and not jump out of and widen them like a number 11 blade will. That's one tool I won't use!

For guides, I use a metal straight edge clamped to the body or make a pattern with .020 styrene and temp glue it with tiny drops of crazy glue. Once the initial cuts are made, remove the pattern and sand away the crazy glue.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Thursday, February 02, 2017 10:56 AM

There are some good suggestions! It seems to me though, Dymo tape would be difficult in anything other than a straight cut, although VERY useful in that application.

Layering tape and metal templates led me to wonder how thick aluminum tape would do as a guide?

So far though, I like the .020 styrene jig idea. I have plenty sheet styrene for the other build and after the initial scribes and removal of the template, it can be used on the opposite side! Digging with a dental pick is what I've been used to so that's another plus.

That's not to discount the other suggestions, because I've already filed those for future reference. Thanks for the help guys.

My favorite color is clear.

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    December, 2007
  • From: Portland Oregon: Tree Country. Most beautiful area on the West coast.
Posted by Treehugger Dave on Saturday, February 04, 2017 7:35 AM

I have been using the Dymo tape method for a dozen years with great results. Dymo tape can be cut into any shape you want , especially for rounded corners for doors and trunks. For many of my projects I stacked 2 layers so it's easier to follow with my exacto knife and #11 blade to scribe with and not slip. It takes a little practice to get it right, but like anything after a while you start getting good results.

Remember that the adhesive they use is strong enough to lift paint and primer, so make sure your taping and scribing is done on bare plastic Thumbs Up.

Good luck on what ever you choose to do.

I love Mecum Auctions and Barrett/Jackson auctions and what would I do without Ebay.

 

 

                                     

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by Prowler85 on Saturday, February 04, 2017 11:04 AM

I use 1:1 car paint, 2 K urethane clear, (Airbrushed Allways), and spray can gray primer, I scuff the body with either a 3M red or gray scuff pads,(wet with dish soap), before priming, spray a few of coats of primer, lightly not heavy, wet sand with 1000 grit paper, and prime again, sand with finer paper, sometimes I use a sealer,(don't have to), I take about a week to do this, I let it gas out, you can airbrush or spray cans, allways wet sand it is much finer, I am a body and paint guy. HAPPY HAPPY MODELING.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by Prowler85 on Saturday, February 04, 2017 11:09 AM

Sorry wrong forum, ment to put it on body

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Saturday, February 04, 2017 11:47 AM

Thank goodness you came back! I thought for a minute there my computer was messing with me and switched pages! I went back to the top twice to check! lol

My favorite color is clear.

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Tuesday, February 28, 2017 1:53 PM

Ive used the excellent Bare Metal Foil Co. panel scribers for years now  These have a "hook-shape" tip that they sharpen to a triangular cross section, with a very sharp pointed tip.

For long straight panel lines, believe it or not I use just the very tip of the back end of an Xacto razor saw blade! Why the back end?  Because I can "push" it against the work to start the groove, get a guideline groove started, then carefully "pull" it forward toward me, while holding the saw blade at a VERY shallow angle, which lets the groove I've started become a "guide" for getting the long, straight groove that makes most any door line.  For working up the "radiused" or curved panel line seen on many car doors, I simply used my Dremel Tool with a grindstone tip, to make a "hooked" or crescent-shaped "cutout" at the very back of the razor saw blade (the edge at the back end of the saw blade that is PERPENDICULAR to the cutting (or saw-toothed) edge of the saw.  This allows me to use the very back "teeth" of the saw, which I can carefully scribe in (with repeated passes) as I make the needed curved line.

What if I make a mistake, get a scratch or gouge where it shouldn't be?  Simple to fix:  Just a little dab of Bondo one-part "Lacquer" spot & glaze putty (let it dry overnight--or use a food dehydrator to force the issue if you have one--I do!), then sand the surface smooth, and  rescribe gently.

This does take some practice to master, but I found, years ago, that it works very well--been doing this on model car bodies for about 35-40 years now.

Art Anderson

  • Member since
    July, 2016
  • From: Podunk, Illinois
Posted by smhardesty on Tuesday, March 07, 2017 11:27 PM

Outstanding thread. I’m in the process of scribing lines on my very first build. It has been going slowly as I am trying different things and different ways of holding my tools. There are a few really good ideas here. I’m gonna have to try a couple of them to see if anything works better for me. Thanks!

Steve

On the bench - Right now, a mess.

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