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Dupli-Color

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  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: El Dorado Hills, CA
Dupli-Color
Posted by IBuild1/48 on Friday, April 29, 2016 9:32 AM

As anyone used Dupli-color spray paint on plastic model cars?

what kind of success have you had?

did you use a primer?

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Friday, April 29, 2016 12:49 PM

Yes, and yes. I've used Dupli-Color paints a few times on model kits with success. I've also mixed Dupli-Color with other brands like when I want to clear the body I've used MCW, Black Gold, Tamiya, and Testors paints and they all seem compatable. Always use a primer under the color coats. I use grey primer under black and silver colors, and white primer under everything else, and this seems to work for me.

I finished this build last yearwith Dupli-Color that sat in the can for 'bout 17 years and it still worked great.

High octane

  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: arlington, tx.
Posted by rusty32rod on Friday, April 29, 2016 12:52 PM

    I do use their primer & it works great, but i haven't used their colored paint yet. i have painted some models without using primer first (many, many years ago). the finish came out nice, but the paint would flake off before i even finished the build almost every time. i asked a neighbor friend if he had any idea why that kept happening & he asked if used primer first. the next build got primer first and to this day (29 years later) the paint still looks like it did back then. some people don't use primer and still seem to get good results. i, myself, will continue with primer. i hope this helps you in some way. i'm pretty sure somebody here will fill you in on the rest of your question(s).     

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, April 29, 2016 2:36 PM

I've used Duplicolor paints many times on kits.

I basically stick to the solid colors myself though.

The metallics are designed for real automobiles & the flake size is therefore out of scale for 1/25th kits.

I use an airbrush with MCW paints for my metallic paint jobs.

Absolutely, primer is a must for any automotive lacquer!

Lacquers are very "hot" and will craze plastic like nobodies business!

 

Steve

 

These are a couple of examples of kits I've done with Duplicolor rattle cans.

 

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Highland, UT
Posted by avidinha on Friday, April 29, 2016 3:59 PM

I use Duplicolor paints a lot, and I use Duplicolor primer even when I use other paints. I've had a lot of success with it.

This is Duplicolor rattle can paint with Duplicolor rattle can clear, right out of the can, no polishing.

I.Y.A.A.Y.A.S.

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Friday, April 29, 2016 7:32 PM

Goofy62 I like both of your builds, but that Sunliner is really sweeeet! I know where I can get that kit, however it's likely to just sit on the pile like the rest of my stash.

High octane

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Eagan MN
Posted by hotrod jim on Friday, April 29, 2016 8:26 PM

Ive had no problems with dupli color..I do like to airbrush my paint on..

  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: El Dorado Hills, CA
Posted by IBuild1/48 on Friday, April 29, 2016 8:39 PM

I want to thank ALL of you on the input. I will be doing a 66 Galaxy and use the Dupli-color. Not sure on the color. I am hoping theY make a candy apple red.

I really like the build photos. Stunning work!Yes

  • Member since
    January 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Friday, April 29, 2016 9:23 PM

Good advice above. I always use Dupli-Color sandable gray primer on all my builds. (Be sure that the plastic is wet-sanded with at least 400 grit and washed with Dawn dish washing liquid and warm water and thoroughly dry before priming.) Steve (Goofy62) does beautiful work, as you have seen. While I agree that most automotive metallics are too coarse to be realistic on model cars, there are some exceptions. Check out some 1:1 cars with colors that you like and check the size of the metallic component. There are quite a few with very fine metallic content. You might want to check out the metallic red basecoat/clearcoat on the Lexus and Cadillac cars of the past five years or so. They look a lot like candy apple without the application problems of true candy apple. (I have used Dupli-Color GM 479 Cayenne Red which has VERY fine metallic.) The Dupli-Color basecoats and clear coat cover with minimal film thickness. They can be decanted and airbrushed, but require a couple of BBs in the airbrush jar to keep the metallic in suspension during application. Good luck on your project! 

chucky

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, April 29, 2016 11:48 PM

chucky

Good advice above. I always use Dupli-Color sandable gray primer on all my builds. (Be sure that the plastic is wet-sanded with at least 400 grit and washed with Dawn dish washing liquid and warm water and thoroughly dry before priming.) Steve (Goofy62) does beautiful work, as you have seen. While I agree that most automotive metallics are too coarse to be realistic on model cars, there are some exceptions. Check out some 1:1 cars with colors that you like and check the size of the metallic component. There are quite a few with very fine metallic content. You might want to check out the metallic red basecoat/clearcoat on the Lexus and Cadillac cars of the past five years or so. They look a lot like candy apple without the application problems of true candy apple. (I have used Dupli-Color GM 479 Cayenne Red which has VERY fine metallic.) The Dupli-Color basecoats and clear coat cover with minimal film thickness. They can be decanted and airbrushed, but require a couple of BBs in the airbrush jar to keep the metallic in suspension during application. Good luck on your project! 

 

Yes, there are some of the Duplicolor paints that have finer or "pearl" metallic particles in them that are closer to scale for models.

You just have to be vigilant when choosing your colors.

The whole point of model building is to make them look as real as possible.

Nothing kills that quicker than the "Bass Boat" affect in my opinion.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Saturday, April 30, 2016 10:21 AM

IBuild1/48

I want to thank ALL of you on the input. I will be doing a 66 Galaxy and use the Dupli-color. Not sure on the color. I am hoping theY make a candy apple red.

I really like the build photos. Stunning work!Yes

 

If you're after a Candy Apple Red, may I suggest using Tamiya Mica Red? IMO, it's one of the best looking red paints there is. This is what it looks like over Tamiya Gold.

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Saturday, April 30, 2016 12:06 PM

Goofy62

I've used Duplicolor paints many times on kits.

I basically stick to the solid colors myself though.

The metallics are designed for real automobiles & the flake size is therefore out of scale for 1/25th kits.

I use an airbrush with MCW paints for my metallic paint jobs.

Absolutely, primer is a must for any automotive lacquer!

Lacquers are very "hot" and will craze plastic like nobodies business!

 

Steve

Very Nice builds Steve!

However, I must disagree with you about flake size on DupliColor metallics. I've used Duplicolor paints of all types, including their ttransparent Metalcast line (a good source for Candy paints), all their primers (Sandable black, white, dark gray and red, as well as their primer sealer, great for blocking colored plastic bodies), and also their Metalcast Ground and Metal Specks Silver paints for a base for candy colors. I specifically go to Duplicolor metallics because of their fine flake which, IMHO, scales more correctly than most metalluics for a true scale metallic effect. For a more coarse flake, the Bass Boat effect mentioned above, I use Duplicolor Metal Specks silver for my base coat and then either a Duplicolor metallic or a transparent lacquer (either Duplicolor Metalcast or Testors or Tamiya transparents, depending on the desired shade I want.) All Duplicolor rattle can paints are designed for touchup work and therefore slightly more transparent than most hobby paints. As a I've found I can get a candy-like effect shooting Duplicolor metallics over a metallic base by limitng myself to no more than three color coats total (the 50 Ford below is a good example).

I can highly recommend Duplicolor paints of all types. They give consistently excellent results and offer many color and technique choices.

Here are some examples using Duplicolor metallics, transparents, metal specks and primers in various ways:

Duplicolor Caribbean Blue metallic over Duplicolor white primer. Despite the lack of a metallic base coat the depth and richness of the finely flecked blue metallic over the white is somewhat candy like:

Duplicolor Cherry Red Metallic over Duplicolor White primer and Gold Metallic Base This is an example of the slightly transparent nature of Duplicolor paints allowing the gold base to show through creating a candy red color.

Duplicolor Medium Quasar Metallic color coat over Duplicolor Metal Specks Silver base coat for a candy metalflake effect.

Duplicolor Metal Specks Silver over Duplicolor White Primer covered in Duplicolor Clear sealer coat. The candy blue fogged panels are home made decals which are slightly transparent. The naked Metal Specks creates the heavy flake "Bass Boat" effect. Spraying light coats of transparents over Metal Specks will do the same thing in other shades.

Duplicolor Metalcast Purple (a transparent) over Duplicolor white primer and Duplicolor Silver Metallic for a Candy effect:

Tamiya Transparent Yellow over Duplicolor White Primer and Duplicolor Gold metallic base:

 

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: El Dorado Hills, CA
Posted by IBuild1/48 on Sunday, May 1, 2016 12:44 PM

Hi plowboy

real like the paint suggestion. Did you airbrush or use rattle can? How many coats?

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Sunday, May 1, 2016 3:22 PM

IBuild1/48

Hi plowboy

real like the paint suggestion. Did you airbrush or use rattle can? How many coats?

 

 

Rattle can always. Paint is two coats of gold, three of Mica Red and three coats of clear. All Tamiya paint.

  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: El Dorado Hills, CA
Posted by IBuild1/48 on Sunday, May 1, 2016 6:42 PM
Bernard, Those are some "Awesome" Builds. I very much appreciate the insight on my paint question and have taken note.
  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: El Dorado Hills, CA
Posted by IBuild1/48 on Sunday, May 1, 2016 6:44 PM
What car is this? Is it resin or your own handy work?
  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Monday, May 2, 2016 7:02 AM

IBuild1/48
What car is this? Is it resin or your own handy work?
 

 

If you're talking about the Ranchero, it's my work except for the top chop. It's the old Revell kit with the multi piece body and severe chop.

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, May 6, 2016 1:22 PM

gbk1
Well, I guess we could just say that you've had better luck than I've had with the Duplicolor metallics.

I do use them occasionally as a base for MCW paints to save paint.

Everytime I use them, I get very heavy flakes that look way out of scale.

Might be just luck of the draw with the particular colors I've bought but it really killed any thought of using them for a finish coat for me.

Many of the MCW metallics are so fine that they are almost un-noticable as a metallic paint from any distance.

To me, that's the way most of them should be.

You get the "sheen" of the metallic paint, without the prominent flakes.

The MCW "Cay Coral" paint that I used on a '58 Impala comes to mind.

I challenge anyone to spot a "flake" anywhere on this model, even close up.

And yet, it is a metallic color & the "sheen" makes that obvious.

I guess we all have our own likes & dislikes, & that's how it should be.

But I will still stick with my MCW paints & recommend them to anyone.

 

Steve

 

 

 

 
Goofy62

I've used Duplicolor paints many times on kits.

I basically stick to the solid colors myself though.

The metallics are designed for real automobiles & the flake size is therefore out of scale for 1/25th kits.

I use an airbrush with MCW paints for my metallic paint jobs.

Absolutely, primer is a must for any automotive lacquer!

Lacquers are very "hot" and will craze plastic like nobodies business!

 

Steve

 

Very Nice builds Steve!

However, I must disagree with you about flake size on DupliColor metallics. I've used Duplicolor paints of all types, including their ttransparent Metalcast line (a good source for Candy paints), all their primers (Sandable black, white, dark gray and red, as well as their primer sealer, great for blocking colored plastic bodies), and also their Metalcast Ground and Metal Specks Silver paints for a base for candy colors. I specifically go to Duplicolor metallics because of their fine flake which, IMHO, scales more correctly than most metalluics for a true scale metallic effect. For a more coarse flake, the Bass Boat effect mentioned above, I use Duplicolor Metal Specks silver for my base coat and then either a Duplicolor metallic or a transparent lacquer (either Duplicolor Metalcast or Testors or Tamiya transparents, depending on the desired shade I want.) All Duplicolor rattle can paints are designed for touchup work and therefore slightly more transparent than most hobby paints. As a I've found I can get a candy-like effect shooting Duplicolor metallics over a metallic base by limitng myself to no more than three color coats total (the 50 Ford below is a good example).

I can highly recommend Duplicolor paints of all types. They give consistently excellent results and offer many color and technique choices.

Here are some examples using Duplicolor metallics, transparents, metal specks and primers in various ways:

Duplicolor Caribbean Blue metallic over Duplicolor white primer. Despite the lack of a metallic base coat the depth and richness of the finely flecked blue metallic over the white is somewhat candy like:

Duplicolor Cherry Red Metallic over Duplicolor White primer and Gold Metallic Base This is an example of the slightly transparent nature of Duplicolor paints allowing the gold base to show through creating a candy red color.

Duplicolor Medium Quasar Metallic color coat over Duplicolor Metal Specks Silver base coat for a candy metalflake effect.

Duplicolor Metal Specks Silver over Duplicolor White Primer covered in Duplicolor Clear sealer coat. The candy blue fogged panels are home made decals which are slightly transparent. The naked Metal Specks creates the heavy flake "Bass Boat" effect. Spraying light coats of transparents over Metal Specks will do the same thing in other shades.

Duplicolor Metalcast Purple (a transparent) over Duplicolor white primer and Duplicolor Silver Metallic for a Candy effect:

Tamiya Transparent Yellow over Duplicolor White Primer and Duplicolor Gold metallic base:

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2016
Posted by model-a on Tuesday, June 7, 2016 6:04 AM

You guys are freaky good I hope I can get half as good as ya'll, the last time I built a model was in my model club in 1978 at school.

  • Member since
    September 2016
  • From: Whitehouse, Tx.
Posted by oldschool53 on Monday, September 19, 2016 12:22 PM
Sweet ride

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