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Need help on indoor spray painting, please.

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  • Member since
    September 2019
Need help on indoor spray painting, please.
Posted by Mvrv on Sunday, September 1, 2019 9:37 AM

Hello, I am a very basic car modeler. I would like to spray paint indoors on a budget.  I have been using spray cans outside, but now that winter is coming I will need to go inside to my basement.   I am concerned about the fumes and odor.   Should I use arcrylics?   Brush the paint on the body or airbrush?  Again I am just a very basic modeler and have no idea on how to proceed.  Any recommendations I will be very grateful. Thank you!

  • Member since
    November 2013
Posted by Daddy_O on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 7:51 AM

No matter which paint you use, if you are indoor you need to have some kind of respirator for paint.

Ventilation is also a necessity. You can't risk fumes getting to the furnace or hot water heater and igniting. You also don't want it filtering through the house and smelling up everything.

Lots of guys paint a few bodies during the good weather and only have to do the hand painting stuff during the winter. That's sounds to me like your best bet. Just make sure you review the instructions to make sure that any body pans, etc aren't glued on until after the chassis goes on, or you'll be in a world of hurt.

G'luck!

  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:56 AM

I have been painting indoors all of my modeling carreer, (nearly 50 years)

I've never used a spray booth and have never used ventilation.

I use a respirator or at least a good dust mask, (depending on what or how much I'm spraying)

I paint in a seperate room with a door that I can close.

Granted, the smell can drift through the house and my wife will cuss me out occasionally, but it will generally subside after an hour or so.

You will be much better off using an airbrush as rattle cans not only belch out a lot more paint, but have a lot more odor due to the propellant.

I will not recommend this or say that it is optimal or for everyone, but it has worked just fine for me my entire life.

I throw on my mask, go into my room and paint and then close the door when I leave to let the dust and fumes settle.

And don't be fooled, acrylics and enamels can be just as hard on you as lacquers, sometimes worse.

 

 

Steve

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 9:05 AM

If you paint in the basement, you'll need good ventilation and a respirator!  Keep paint and its fumes away from the furnace and the hot water heater.  If you can't paint your future projects outside when the weather is nice and warm, I would like to suggest getting a paintbooth for winter-time painting.  I found these plans on a model railroad forum and built my own paintbooth.  If you decide you want to tackle a project like this, make sure all connections are sealed!  Use a fan that is a non-armature type (magnetic induction) and be sure to vent it outside.  

Or, you can order a paintbooth from one of several online sources like Micro Mark.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Mvrv on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:20 PM
Thank you!!!
  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Mvrv on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:21 PM
Thank you very much!
  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Mvrv on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:21 PM
Thank you so much for the information!
  • Member since
    May 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 6:29 PM

I will suggest that you try to at least do your priming outside if possible.

I do that in my basement as well, but I have found that primer creates twice as much dust as the paint itself and in general has a much more powerful smell.

I spray lacquer paints through my airbrush with very little issues at all.

The smell is minimal minus the propellent from a spray can, and it creates a lot lets overspray and dust than a rattle can will due to the fact that you are spraying much less paint with an airbrush.

I barely notice any smell at all after a session with the airbrush.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Mvrv on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 8:13 PM

Thank you all for the excellent advice And taking the time to help me out.  

  • Member since
    February 2014
Posted by Scale modeller on Sunday, December 1, 2019 3:44 PM

I built a spray booth out of scrap plywood, and a cheap bathroom exhaust fan, $30 and an hour labour. It seems to work well

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: West Bloomfield, MI
Posted by steveracer on Sunday, December 22, 2019 8:45 AM

My wife is super sensitive to the smells, and has almost put an end to my modeling projects indoors.  However, it seems I can get away with it if I turn off or down the heat to keep the odors in the basement and not flowing through the rest of the house.  I have a Micro Mark paint booth vented to the outdoors.  This seems to work pretty good, and sometimes I cheat and paint when she is asleep, he he he.  Yes, rattle cans put out more paint, but the modelmaster paints smell quite a bit too with the airbrush.  It really sucks, but I have to prep a lot of parts ready to paint, and when she is gone out of the house, I use all these techniques and it works pretty good.

steelies, dog dishes and poker chips

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Nashua, New Hampshire
Posted by mrmike on Sunday, December 22, 2019 12:32 PM

One thing that I found with my paintbooth is to run it for about 15 minutes before you start painting.  Once the booth has been running for a while, the fumes are less likely to invade the rest of the house.

"That's Spenser with an 'S' like the poet."

Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

Classic Plastic Model Club

  • Member since
    November 2004
  • From: Winnipeg Canada
Posted by Wayne Farmer on Wednesday, December 25, 2019 2:29 PM
I did that one night..I shot three engines with Duplicolor Chrrysler engine Green the a chassis and wheels with Acrylic Enamel mixed from an auto store..Cleaned my hands with Lacquer Thinner then downed two glasses of red wine..Stood up and held on to wheeled chair..Boom, down on the floor and neighbor had to come and lift me up..Too many fumes and maybe liquid too..Closed the door then went up stairs..No fumes at all smelled in house..

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