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Green Horn Probs!

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  • Member since
    August, 2017
Green Horn Probs!
Posted by original_40 on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 11:11 PM

Hey guys,

Starting on my very FIRST kit and come bearing TONS of questions! Ive read many articles and watched many videos and its been a little overwhelming for me about where to start. I wanted to start by painting the engine but after putting together the engine block, I realized...hmmm..I probably should have painted the pieces while they were still on the sprue (first rookie mistake). I'm very anxious and nervous about this new hobby. Forgive me. My main questions are, "Should the pieces be primed before painting?" (I'm Brush Painting btw). I'm testing acrylic colors and enamel colors, "Should i be thinning the paints before I start painting? Is that more of a rule of thumb or just preference?". Sorry if this comes off elementary, alot of pre-information Ive received has kind of left me overwhelmed and undecided. Suggestions would be greatly appreciated! thnxSmile

TnT
  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by TnT on Thursday, August 24, 2017 12:06 AM

Some parts are best painted after assembly. Such as the block. That way you can sand and file the seams. Usually bottle paints need no thinning. You can start your build any where. But read and read and read instructions. Some parts go on in final assembly. Primer is an option. Some do some don't. Too many layers of paint and primer make it look thick. Ecspecially edges. If you are brushing get good brushes. And the right cleaner/thinner for paints used. Also for clear parts get what they call a white glue. Not elmers. And welcome to the hobby. Build it your way. Do not worry what others think of your build, it only has to make you happy. If you get frustrated step back , take a breath, come back later. Good luck and happy modeling.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by original_40 on Thursday, August 24, 2017 1:55 AM
Thank you for the words of encouragement. Appreciate the tips. Thanks again!
  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Thursday, August 24, 2017 8:35 AM

If you have more questions, please ask as there is a LOT of building talent on this forum and also many who would be glad to help.

High octane

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Thursday, August 24, 2017 8:56 AM

original_40

Hey guys,

Starting on my very FIRST kit and come bearing TONS of questions! Ive read many articles and watched many videos and its been a little overwhelming for me about where to start. I wanted to start by painting the engine but after putting together the engine block, I realized...hmmm..I probably should have painted the pieces while they were still on the sprue (first rookie mistake). I'm very anxious and nervous about this new hobby. Forgive me. My main questions are, "Should the pieces be primed before painting?" (I'm Brush Painting btw). I'm testing acrylic colors and enamel colors, "Should i be thinning the paints before I start painting? Is that more of a rule of thumb or just preference?". Sorry if this comes off elementary, alot of pre-information Ive received has kind of left me overwhelmed and undecided. Suggestions would be greatly appreciated! thnxSmile

 

 

Always remove the parts before painting. Otherwise, you'll have to sand and touch up the paint after you remove the parts. It's also impossible to remove the mold lines from the parts while they're on the tree. So, you made no mistake.

Primer makes all the difference in the world when it comes time to paint whether you're spraying or brushing it on. I used to only primer the body on a model. Now, I primer every single part. I was always frustrated with how my engines and chassis' would look when I painted them. It didn't matter if I sprayed them or brush painted them. The paint would always be thin on the raised details and sharp corners etc. unless I used a flat paint. One day, I decided to try primering an engine before painting it. When I spray painted it, I was very pleased with how well the paint covered with just one coat of paint. I've primered everything since.

I like the acrylic paints best for brush painting. Easy clean up and covers better. They also don't show brush marks as much as enamels do. I don't thin acrylics. But, when I'm brushing them on, I dip my brush in water before loading it with paint. For me, it makes the paint flow better onto the parts and almost eliminates brush marks. You can do the same with enamels. But, with thinner instead of water.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by original_40 on Thursday, August 24, 2017 12:35 PM

Thank you for your input. Much appreciated. Is there a brush on primer that you might suggest? spray on primer?. I intented to use the spray can method to paint the body. But right now I want to focus on the engine. 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by 195X on Thursday, August 24, 2017 2:26 PM

Pretty much any flat paint can be a primer. Most modelers prefer Duplicolor or Tamiya gray. For a cheaper alternative, I use Krylon flat grey.

My favorite color is clear. I am also ambidexterous, I can screw up equally well with either hand. I am 53 years old and been building for most of that time. :)

On the bench... somewhere. Pink Panther show car, 1978 Dodge Magnum Charger Daytona Midnight edition SE 300. Mongrel T.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Monday, October 09, 2017 12:59 PM

original_40

Hey guys,

Starting on my very FIRST kit and come bearing TONS of questions! Ive read many articles and watched many videos and its been a little overwhelming for me about where to start. I wanted to start by painting the engine but after putting together the engine block, I realized...hmmm..I probably should have painted the pieces while they were still on the sprue (first rookie mistake). I'm very anxious and nervous about this new hobby. Forgive me. My main questions are, "Should the pieces be primed before painting?" (I'm Brush Painting btw). I'm testing acrylic colors and enamel colors, "Should i be thinning the paints before I start painting? Is that more of a rule of thumb or just preference?". Sorry if this comes off elementary, alot of pre-information Ive received has kind of left me overwhelmed and undecided. Suggestions would be greatly appreciated! thnxSmile

 

I would add, NEVER twist and break pieces free from the sprue.  As you can damage the piece by twisting and breaking it free from the spure.  Use a new sharp X-Acto or similar knife or a pair of sprue cutters, to cut the parts free.

Scrape chrome/paint from pieces to be glued together.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Monday, October 09, 2017 1:02 PM

Plowboy

 

 
original_40

Hey guys,

Starting on my very FIRST kit and come bearing TONS of questions! Ive read many articles and watched many videos and its been a little overwhelming for me about where to start. I wanted to start by painting the engine but after putting together the engine block, I realized...hmmm..I probably should have painted the pieces while they were still on the sprue (first rookie mistake). I'm very anxious and nervous about this new hobby. Forgive me. My main questions are, "Should the pieces be primed before painting?" (I'm Brush Painting btw). I'm testing acrylic colors and enamel colors, "Should i be thinning the paints before I start painting? Is that more of a rule of thumb or just preference?". Sorry if this comes off elementary, alot of pre-information Ive received has kind of left me overwhelmed and undecided. Suggestions would be greatly appreciated! thnxSmile

 

 

 

 

Always remove the parts before painting. Otherwise, you'll have to sand and touch up the paint after you remove the parts. It's also impossible to remove the mold lines from the parts while they're on the tree. So, you made no mistake.

Primer makes all the difference in the world when it comes time to paint whether you're spraying or brushing it on. I used to only primer the body on a model. Now, I primer every single part. I was always frustrated with how my engines and chassis' would look when I painted them. It didn't matter if I sprayed them or brush painted them. The paint would always be thin on the raised details and sharp corners etc. unless I used a flat paint. One day, I decided to try primering an engine before painting it. When I spray painted it, I was very pleased with how well the paint covered with just one coat of paint. I've primered everything since.

I like the acrylic paints best for brush painting. Easy clean up and covers better. They also don't show brush marks as much as enamels do. I don't thin acrylics. But, when I'm brushing them on, I dip my brush in water before loading it with paint. For me, it makes the paint flow better onto the parts and almost eliminates brush marks. You can do the same with enamels. But, with thinner instead of water.

 

I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with you.  When it comes to small parts, it is far easier to paint them while they are still on the sprue.  Yes, there may be a little touching up after it is cut free.  But it is far eaiser to paint small pieces while they are still attached to the sprue.

I would say that I end up painting a large percentage of the parts while they are on the sprue as the sprue makes it easier to handle them.  I will use masking tape to mask the gluing surfaces.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: Douglas AZ>
Posted by littletimmy on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:07 PM

I have always primered and then painted part's while their still on the spru/tree.

Yes you will have to go back and touch up the paint where the part was attached to the spru but it's not that much work.

Definatly scrape the paint off any edge/ attachment point before gluing part's together.

(This is ESPECIALLY true for Chrome part's )

If all the parts of a paticular assembly are going to be painted the same color I assemble them first ..... then paint.      EXAMPLE: Prime part's on the tree, then assemble, then paint final color.

Dont worry about the thumb print.... paint it rust and call it battle damage

  • Member since
    May, 2013
Posted by Digital_Cowboy on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:39 PM

littletimmy

I have always primered and then painted part's while their still on the spru/tree.

Yes you will have to go back and touch up the paint where the part was attached to the spru but it's not that much work.

Definatly scrape the paint off any edge/ attachment point before gluing part's together.

(This is ESPECIALLY true for Chrome part's )

If all the parts of a paticular assembly are going to be painted the same color I assemble them first ..... then paint.      EXAMPLE: Prime part's on the tree, then assemble, then paint final color.

 

Agreed, except that I seldom if ever prime the smaller pieces.  Bodies, hoods, trunk lids, yes.  But not the smaller pieces.

---------------------------------
Digital Cowboy
Live Long and Prosper
On the bench: Star Trek: Romulan Bird of Prey; 1964 Ford Fairlane

  • Member since
    September, 2017
Posted by Big Gary on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 3:38 AM

I primer everything, especially sub assemblies like engines. I use only WalMart primer:cheap & works well, though becoming harder to find, I think they're phasing it out.

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