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Priming Before Painting Really Needed?

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  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Priming Before Painting Really Needed?
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Thursday, May 28, 2015 9:22 PM

I've been looking at the instructions that came with my first model (haven't done modeling yet), and I noticed it doesn't mention primer or using primer at all.  I'm talking about a Tamiya Car Model.

As I heard, Priming is a must, but is it?  If I go by the paint/assembly instructions, it doesn't tell me when to apply my primer to parts.  I don't want to apply primer or paint to assembly joints if I can help it (I don't want to worry about having to sand those spots down, some spots are impossible to get because they are almost like trying to sand down a tiny hole).

Now, I have a feeling I need to prime because I plan to do all brush painting.  I know the hype is big on using an airbrush or aerosol spray, but I'm trying to be as cost-effective as possible.

Any insight would help.  Thanks.

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    August, 2013
  • From: West Seneca, NY (Buffalo)
Posted by Snork56 on Thursday, May 28, 2015 10:48 PM
Why is it that new modelers go through buying a model and all the glues and supplies, but then skimp on the body painting process and corresponding paints? The appear-ence of a well painted model is the most looked feature when a model is completed! It just doesn't make sense o build any other way! Bass-ackward thinking!!

To get back up when you are down, fight when you are struggling, give the extra effort when you are in pain, come back when no one expects you to and stand up tall when people try to pull you down.    That is what makes up a true champion!!   Snork56 (S56) Henry D.  

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Friday, May 29, 2015 11:10 AM

That's not a positive response to my question. I'm asking about priming, not painting. I noticed my model instructions doesn't mention priming.

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: arlington, tx.
Posted by rusty32rod on Friday, May 29, 2015 4:29 PM

   I could be wrong, but it might be less expensive in the long run to paint the body with a spray can as opposed to brush painting it. brush painting seems to use up more paint to cover the surface, not to mention, you usually lose some of the finer details. i always primer my parts before painting, but that's just me. to be quite honest with you, if i were to brush paint a car body, i wouldn't primer first. the reason i say that is because in previous experiences, brush painting one color over another tends to cause the two colors to mix & cause it to look terrible. don't forget to make sure and wash ALL parts before assembly to get rid of the mold release oils. i hope this helps answer your question. maybe somebody else will have some imput for you as well in a bit. good luck with your build. can't wait to see it.     

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 29, 2015 5:55 PM

I get the cost-effective approach, but with the investment already made in the kit and supplies it makes more sense to me to go with a most-cost-effective-quality approach.  

Brush painting the body color(s) will detract more from the overall look than almost any other single thing you can do to the model.

Tamiya sprays are great paints.  They can be applied directly to the plastic with excellent results.  

But, if you are going to mask and paint a second color over the base color, you will want to apply a light coat of primer for adhesion, otherwise the masking tape might pull the paint off.  

Tamiya primers are great and yes a bit pricey.  But the value is high, one can goes a long way and you only need a light coat for adhesion promotion.

 

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Midwest
Posted by High octane on Friday, May 29, 2015 7:53 PM

You can get Tamiya Primer at Hobby Lobby and also Testors spray paint there as well. If you want to be "cost effective" y,ou can use your 40% OFF coupon.

High octane

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Modesto, Ca
Posted by kitbashn82 on Friday, May 29, 2015 8:59 PM

Scale-Master

I get the cost-effective approach, but with the investment already made in the kit and supplies it makes more sense to me to go with a most-cost-effective-quality approach.  

Brush painting the body color(s) will detract more from the overall look than almost any other single thing you can do to the model.

Tamiya sprays are great paints.  They can be applied directly to the plastic with excellent results.  

But, if you are going to mask and paint a second color over the base color, you will want to apply a light coat of primer for adhesion, otherwise the masking tape might pull the paint off.  

Tamiya primers are great and yes a bit pricey.  But the value is high, one can goes a long way and you only need a light coat for adhesion promotion.

 

 

 

Listen to what this man has to say, he will not steer you wrong.

Donald Boger

---------------

"Strive for perfection in everything we do. Take the best that exists and make it better. When it does not exist, design it. Accept nothing nearly right or good enough" - Sir Henry Royce 

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Surf City, So Cal
Posted by Scale-Master on Friday, May 29, 2015 10:46 PM

I haven't used the new Testors (lacquer) spray paints, (yet), but I have seen great results from others who have.  If cost is an issue I understand they are a very viable option. 

I have used the older Testors enamel sprays.  I prefer the Tamiya (lacquers) over them.  But to be fair, I've been in the "airbrush mentality" for decades.

Point being, find what works best for you, and much of that is experimenting.

Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... Mark D. Jones

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Saturday, May 30, 2015 8:14 PM

Sounds like spray priming is great for adhesion promotion of paint, but doesn't it effect the color of my paint (like how the primer is a white, gray, or other color)?

If I can just paint without priming and get away with it that may be better for me (since Tamiya instructions doesn't mention priming).  I just need to ensure I take my time and paint on very thin coats so to retain detail in the plastic.  I saw from someone's opinion that paint flakes off if it doesn't get applied on top of primer.  Is this true? If I paint a larger surface like a car body, will I have to worry about my brush strokes showing up or can I avoid that?

I'm afraid that I would be wasting some money with spray paint because of the large amount of paint that will get unused since I would only use it for body color (like if I paint my car body red - when would I paint a car body red again?) (spray paint is $10 each!).  Everything else is much smaller, so I would brush paint those.

Whoo!  I'm trying to get decided on my plan here.  Thank you so much for answering my questions to help me inch my way to the best way for me to get great end results with my models.  I also want to be cost-effective and consistent in the long-run as this is going to be an ongoing hobby for me.

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Newcastle, Sydney, Australia
Posted by Dr.Hemi on Sunday, May 31, 2015 11:06 AM
Well it seems you've got quite a dilemma mate...
I'm assuming, after checking your bio', you're not a teenager, having served in the US Navy.
You also mention you love cars, video games about cars etc & you loved WRC ( whilst growing up in Germany )
Can we all assume then, that you know how are a real car is built - beginning to end? ( the normal process ) Have you ever seen any of the readily available TV shows on cars/customised cars/ factory stock cars, such as Restoration Garage, Fast'n'Loud, Graveyard Cars, Overhaulin', Rides, Fat'n'Furious etc etc?? Have you ever bought/read a car magazine, any type of car magazine?? Ever been in the internet ( besides here? ) perusing the thousands & thousands of car related sites? Maybe even Googled images of your favourite car/s?? Ever ( assuming you're on Facebook ) bothered to find car related sites on F/book?? Other Modelling sites/Builders... Looked at their work maybe??
I'm not trying to be rude, nor am i trying to make you look silly... It's all about education, your education & helping yourself, in this cool hobby you've chosen to be a part of. It's 2015 now... Not 1975. Along with all this new, modern technology we have, common sense will go a long way to helping you help yourself & beyond that, guys here are & on nearly every other model forum there is ;) . Just about every question you've asked, both here & in other areas of this forum, have already been asked & answered many, many times. Thats ok though because you won't be the last to ask them, they'll be asked again, & there are members here who are always willing to reply/help, no matter how brief & unhelpful their replies are or how well thought out & detailed their replies are.
As for building these models, research is key! Research your subject ( model ) if you feel the need to? Being very new to the hobby, i suggest you do this often. Be it here or another Modelling Forum. Check other builds of the same model, see the W.I.P pictures... Download them if necessary. Ask the builder/s questions if you need to, on how their technique/s on building their model. They will be more than happy to answer your questions :)

Now back to your "brush painting an entire body" question.... Have you ever seen a real 1:1 car brush painted? Ever seen a body shop bruah paint a car ( other than specifically asked to by the owner of the car )? Quality paint jobs aren't done with a "paint brush". Full stop. You've mentioned you want to be in this hobby for the long run/long term, correct? If this is true then you're contradicting your own plan. While most of us are in this hobby for the pure love of it, we aren't all millionaires capable of going out & buying everything we need/want for the hobby/building our models, so i DO understand your need to keep cost low...BUT... Buying in bulk is always cheaper than not. This is true when it comes to nearly everything you need in this hobby, to build your models, be it paint, sandpaper, blades, glue etc... Unless you only plan on building ONE model, ever.

In saying all that, i assume as you've mentioned, you're going to be building more than 1 model & most likely be building/painting them, occasionally, the same colour, say red for instance? If you buy a can of red spray paint ( Tamiya for instance ) you'll be able to spray at least 3 bodies/body parts with the can, given that each will need 3 good coats. Primer paints you'll get similar value or more. If you actually invest ( $ ) in a good quality air-brush & compressor, then a decanted spray can could easily give you even more value for $. Don't forget that in some cases, you might want to build a custom version of a model & therefore you might paint certain other parts of the model the same colour as the body.... So there is NO such thing as "wasted" paint. With other colours like aluminium, steel, black ( gloss/semi-gloss/matt/satin ), silver & chrome, nearly every car has these colours & are needed for chassis parts, motor parts, drivetrain etc... There is NO waste of these colours either... ;) So you'll need to take all of this into consideration when buying your supplies, on whether or not being tight-fisted or being smart will get you the results you desire. ;)

As for "instruction" sheets... They are a base-line, provided to help you put the model together, not so much what colour YOU want to paint it, whether Tamiya/Revell/AMT/Aoshima or Fujimi say's it should be "red, black or blue". They provide basic information regarding how to get the model looking like it does on the box... Not too much detail & in a lot of cases, incorrect detail/information. As i've mentioned previously... Research, research, research your subject... If you want to do it - paint it exactly like it's shown on the box ( in red ) then do it. If you want to paint it black, yellow or ANY other colour, then do so! You're not limited by what the kit manufacturer says on their instruction sheets, you're only limited by YOUR imagination. Simple.
Anyway champ.. Hope in some way any or all of this information is of some help to you.
Cheers Cliff
  • Member since
    May, 2014
Posted by Plopper on Sunday, May 31, 2015 2:16 PM

Wow! Did you take obnoxious lessons or are you just showing off some raw talent? You wrote four paragraphs dripping with sneering and condecension without addressing the OP's question. You say you aren't trying to be insulting or rude, but I can't imagine any other way your bloviating could be interpreted. With people like you representing, I'm not surprised participation on the forum has dropped off.

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Newcastle, Sydney, Australia
Posted by Dr.Hemi on Sunday, May 31, 2015 6:28 PM

Sneering ? Condecending? Yeh ok... If YOU say so... Give me a break! Obviously you haven't seen or read ALL the threads the OP has started in different areas of the forum. Thats called ... Ignorance. Seems you're quite ignorant too... Because if you actually read my reply you'd notice i DID address the OP's question/s on brush painting, cost effectiveness etc.... You know what the real problem is? Ignorant people like you mate.... If you need to have a cry about my reply i'm sure there's someone here who could help you out with some tissues. As for membership numbers dropping... Well thats been happening for quite some time & its no fault of mine.

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Monday, June 01, 2015 12:02 AM

Whoa! Let's go back and actually read all of Cliff's original reply. It's loaded with helpful information and suggestions and does not appear to be any any way demeaning or condescending to me. I applaud him for taking the time to write four paragraphs to the OP, who is possibly a little anxious to get going in the hobby and may need to take some time to follow along in the forums and adjust his priorities somewhat. I think Cliff's suggestions are more helpful and appropriate than many of the rude comments regularly posted by some members here who seem to forget that they were novices at one time. I'm encouraged by the enthusiasm of many of our newer members but it sometimes seems that they might need to slow things down a bit in order to get organized for a good start. 

chucky

  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by dreamsinplastic on Monday, June 01, 2015 11:47 AM

Hey Chucky! What's shakin'?  I've been reading and following these Questions and Replies with "_Lancer" the new modeler .This is NUTS.....back and forth...back and forth and one member going after another. You are right....he needs to SLOW things down a bit,try to understand one step at a time,I think he's trying to cover too many bases at one time. He has legitimate questions,BUT,it seems he might be overwhelming himself,seeking so many answers at one time. Like I said,it's turning into a "JABBING" match and that's not accomplishing or helping ANYONE!!.........Let's just offer our simple recommendations/suggestions and let it go at that.....he'll figure it out,we all had to at some point.Trial and error,testing and research...begats knowledge and experience.........THANKS to ALL the Forum members!!....JohnZ

I'm in the middle of a BIG move....From Corpus Christi TX to Tucson AZ.

NO building for awhile,til I set up my shop again !!

                   

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2011
  • From: long island, new york
Posted by chucky on Monday, June 01, 2015 2:11 PM

Hey, John! I hear you. Kudos to you for taking the time back in the Introduction thread  with the OP to point him in the right direction. We old farts pretty much learned as we went in the "olden days". I imagine that the magazine and the forums can, at times, be intimidating with the glut of information immediately available. Each builder will eventually find his or her own pace and will hopefully have the learing curve shortened somewhat by learning from the experiences of others. When inflation is taken into consideration, the hobby cost is comparable to what we dealt with in the early days, and we had (and still have) our budget limits, too.

chucky

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Cape Coral Florida
Posted by BigTallDad on Monday, June 01, 2015 4:26 PM

I've suggested to the OP that he look at what's available from the site

http://www.pages03.net/kalmbach/SCABeginnerSeries/

Apparently some newbies consider the membership of this site as their personal search engine...no effort whatsoever to find out for themselves.

"In order to teach a dog, you must first be smarter than the dog" P.R. Ferguson

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Monday, June 01, 2015 6:56 PM

I'm a little speechless over that.  I did find what Dr. Hemi said encouraging, but some of my questions were not answered.  I am very detail-oriented and this is how I am (I had to be that way in the Navy).  I like to have my plan precise before I act.  My questions are below, but I will give my assumptions for each one to show that at least I am trying to come up with my own insight on them.  Also, the last thing I want is to be blind at any point during even my first build.  I'm looking forward to this hobby being a big thing for me, perhaps even bigger than life.

By the way, I just turned 32 on May 28.

Does primer effect the color of my paint (like how the primer is a white, gray, or other color)?  My assumption is that it doesn't matter what primer or what color of the primer I get.  I will assume to get Tamiya's (I'm doing all Tamiya stuff) Fine Primer - Light Grey.

What I plan on doing now at this point is to spray my car body (body color) with Tamiya spray paint.  Everything else (small parts, interior, etc.) will be done with painted on acrylic paint.

One question I'm thinking about reposting because no one is answering it and I absolutely can't start until I know exactly what to do is:

How do I mix Tamiya Acrylic Paints together (like how do I measure for 1 part this and 3 parts that)?

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Monday, June 01, 2015 6:56 PM

BigTallDad

I've suggested to the OP that he look at what's available from the site

http://www.pages03.net/kalmbach/SCABeginnerSeries/

Apparently some newbies consider the membership of this site as their personal search engine...no effort whatsoever to find out for themselves.

 

 

^I signed up.  Thanks.  (-:

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Newcastle, Sydney, Australia
Posted by Dr.Hemi on Monday, June 01, 2015 9:13 PM

Aluminum_Lancer

I'm a little speechless over that.  I did find what Dr. Hemi said encouraging, but some of my questions were not answered.  I am very detail-oriented and this is how I am (I had to be that way in the Navy).  I like to have my plan precise before I act.  My questions are below, but I will give my assumptions for each one to show that at least I am trying to come up with my own insight on them.  Also, the last thing I want is to be blind at any point during even my first build.  I'm looking forward to this hobby being a big thing for me, perhaps even bigger than life.

By the way, I just turned 32 on May 28.

Does primer effect the color of my paint (like how the primer is a white, gray, or other color)?  My assumption is that it doesn't matter what primer or what color of the primer I get.  I will assume to get Tamiya's (I'm doing all Tamiya stuff) Fine Primer - Light Grey.

What I plan on doing now at this point is to spray my car body (body color) with Tamiya spray paint.  Everything else (small parts, interior, etc.) will be done with painted on acrylic paint.

One question I'm thinking about reposting because no one is answering it and I absolutely can't start until I know exactly what to do is:

How do I mix Tamiya Acrylic Paints together (like how do I measure for 1 part this and 3 parts that)?

 

Firstly... I'm glad you found what i said encouraging, it will go a long way to aiding you in this hobby. 

To answer your "mixing" question... Why do you want to mix the paints? To change the colours?? If so, why not find the colour ( in Tamiya's range ) that you actually want? That would be the better option. If you're actually asking about "thinning" the colour it shouldn't be necessary. Tamiya's acrylic paints are already thinned. If you want it thinner then use their acrylic thinner. Add a few drops until you get the consistancy you want. ;) 

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 7:31 AM

I replied to a thread about primer a couple of months ago which may answer some of your questions. Here is the link  http://cs.scaleautomag.com/sca/tips_techniques/f/8/t/119991.aspx

The short answer to your question is 'Yes'. The colour of your primer will affect the colour of the final finish in many cases. For bright colours you may want to try white primer. Tamiya makes a fine white primer that is very good and only requires light coats. Light grey primer can give a nice solid and realistic (non plastic) look to the colour. Grey, Black, and Red Oxide primer will have a darkening affect in the final appearance of some colours (reds, yellows, oranges are particularly affected).

As for mixing paint, Dr Hemi asks a good question; are you mixing to thin the paint or create a custom colour? The paint should not need thinning, especially when it is fresh. If it thickens with age, just add a couple drops of appropriate thinner until the paint consistancy is right. Do not add too much.

If you are mixing paint to create custom colours, pour a small amount of one colour into a small mixing pot (a top from a water bottle, etc works well) and add drops of the second colour until you get the colour you want. Stir after every drop or two so as to not over shoot the mix ratio. Be sure to mix enough for the job, otherwise colour matching will be nearly impossible.

However, on your first build, mixing should not be necessary. There really are no hard set rules for this. Probably everyone has their own way of doing things. Good luck.

Que the Vikings: "Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam ..."

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 9:35 AM

The reason why I asked about mixing colors is because the instructions for my Tamiya car model call for it.

If I want the exact color they call for for accuracy, then I need to try to mix the colors together they ask.  Mixing sounds complicated to me (thinning the paint etc.).  

In the instructions they call for mixing 1 part of one paint color with 3 parts of another paint color.

It sounds like what you all are saying is that I simply drop one drop of the 1 part paint onto a palette (I haven't bought paints yet, and assume it comes with a dropper as I've heard), then after each time I do 1 drop of the other paint (3 parts paint), I mix until I get my perceived new color.  I may have to do research about the color they want as I can't see what the color looks like in my instructions.  I'd have to do my best to get it as accurate as possible.

It sounds like it is okay to simply use a stirring stick (I have free coffee stirrers from the local coffee house) to keep stirring the paint colors while it is on my paint palette.  I'd keep stirring until the paints change to a different color together (which I hope it will be this color cosistently on the palette).

That's what I'll do if there is nothing else.  If I avoid mixing this first time around, I may not get the color the instructions is asking for.  If this becomes too hard for me, I may have no choice, but to just hit up a color to be 'decent' enough (one color from the jar - not mixed).  I'm not expecting perfection this time around, but I'm desperately fielding information to avoid those 'major' mistakes, and start myself off in a consistent pattern right.

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Kannsas City
Posted by 93slammer on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 9:53 AM

 

You are being way to anal about wanting to get an exact color match. It's your very first model, you are not going to build a contest winning model your first try. Many times the color references are not anywhere close to the 1:1 (real car).

 

With as anal as you are being, you are not going to enjoy building models. Model building is for fun & relaxation.

 

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Newcastle, Sydney, Australia
Posted by Dr.Hemi on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 10:27 AM
Are you actually serious mate?? Or are you pulling our legs?? Did you actually read anything in my FIRST reply... The parts about - RESEARCHing your subject?? About all "instruction" sheets being a just that, how to put the model together, rather than how accurate they are for detail/colours etc??

How about this... How about YOU actually tell us what MODEL you have ( from Tamiya of course ) that you are planning to build? There's a very good chance someone here has already built it. That way we can advise you further...??
  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 10:28 AM

Yeah, as promod said, don't get too hung up on the fine details, especially for your first build, or you will strip all the enjoyment from it.

With a known paint ratio (3:1) just pour a quantity of paint onto your palatte or your bottle cap (say, 5 drops), then three times as much of the other colour (15 drops) and then mix or stir. Don't fret over exact mix ratio. Tamiya likely spemt less time determining the ratio then you will spend getting it exactly right. Oh, and paint will not come with a dropper. Just dunk your paint stirrer into the paint and let some drops run off onto your palette.

Your desire to be prepared and avoid mistakes is admirable. However, be aware that despite all efforts, mistakes will happen. Lots of them. Some of them big ones. It can't be avoided. It is, in fact, the manner in which we all learned the things we are helping you with right now. Learning from the mistakes of others is a great thing, but mistakes will still happen, and from them you will learn personal lessons yourself. And in the future you will parlay those lessons to the rest of the forum.

I think you are ready to jump in and get at it. Don't expect magic with your first build. The skills required to build a nice clean model must be gained through experience. You will one day build an excellent model that you are proud of, and in its wake there will be a string of mistakes and maybe a couple of trashed models. Just jump in and go, it's the best way to learn. And you may notice that I said you will build an excellent model, but I did not say you will build a perfect on...  because no one has done that yet.

Good luck, relax, and have fun. Cheers.

Que the Vikings: "Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam ..."

  • Member since
    May, 2015
  • From: Norfolk, Virginia (US)
Posted by Aluminum_Lancer on Tuesday, June 02, 2015 11:32 AM

If I wasn't going to enjoy modeling, then I wouldn't have spent so much time on here chatting with you all. 

There were a lot of negative comments from people.  I did not expect people to go to this low and get frustrated over me.  I think my questions are thought out and not complex.

I am ready to do my model now.  I may blog about my model building on here or send you a link to my website, which is on Tumblr as I plan on blogging about my experience there.

Good day.

"I learned to approach racing like a game of billiards. If you bash the ball too hard, you get nowhere. As you handle the cue properly, you drive with more finesse."

-Juan Manuel Fangio

  • Member since
    November, 2011
  • From: Houston
Posted by BubbaMoose on Thursday, November 08, 2018 2:25 PM

Aluminum_Lancer

If I wasn't going to enjoy modeling, then I wouldn't have spent so much time on here chatting with you all. 

There were a lot of negative comments from people.  I did not expect people to go to this low and get frustrated over me.  I think my questions are thought out and not complex.

I am ready to do my model now.  I may blog about my model building on here or send you a link to my website, which is on Tumblr as I plan on blogging about my experience there.

Good day.

 

I just read your Post & it’s attached chained comments...I see that this info was dated back several years ago & just happened to be the time I jumped back into this Hobby. First of all I’m embarrassed regarding the treatment (answers U received) for the reason that I tell EVERYONE what an Awesome “COMMUNITY” we have with nothing but KIND & HELPFUL folks involved... U did receive many GREAT & SPOT ON help with everything, however it was sure peppered with some tuff criticism.. (IMHO)the negitive digs & barbs U received might be a way to counsel a prepubescent child, but not a grown man looking for some friendly advice. Tough Crowd.... Im a retired Texas Ranger living in Houston, Tx & happy to tell U that U R  “GUARANTEED” to find the WORLDS FINEST SKILLED MASTERS on Instagram within the (Scale Auto Community) & U Will NEVER be treated anything other than a KIND & RESPECTFUL manner. look me up @ZenModeling... (hopefully these folks didn’t scare U off)

Lee

  • Member since
    July, 2018
Posted by OldTallDad on Thursday, November 08, 2018 5:21 PM

It's SO nice to see a three-year-old post revived with a response that has nothing to add, other than possible spam (look me up @ZenModeling)

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