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Wheel detailing

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  • Member since
    September, 2016
Wheel detailing
Posted by flat33 on Thursday, September 08, 2016 12:11 PM

Well guys im kinda new here to these parts of town, Started a fujimi porsche 911s kit the other day and have just got to the wheels and I want to detail them would the process be mask and brush or could I use an easier method maybe even like they were done in the factory where they were dipped in paint? any ideas or help is entirely appreciated. I will leave some photos to show how I mean, as you can see the paint is deep in there and my masking tape wont stick to such a small surface anyway please have a look.Confusedfuchs

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Thursday, September 08, 2016 3:20 PM

I often use liquid mask for this type of work. The Humbrol brand is not so good but the MicroScale brand works fairly well. Definately practice on a couple of scrap wheels first.

Assuming the kit wheels are chrome, apply the masking goop with a brush to the areas that are to remain unpainted. The mask can be trimmed with a sharp exacto if needed. Once dry, spray the wheels with your black paint of choice (Tamiya semi gloss black would look great). If the chrome bit is to be dulled a bit, spray the whole wheel with satin clear once the mask is removed and the paint is dry.

If the kit wheel includes the lug nuts, be sure to put a dot of masking goop on them as well. If you are going to spray satin clear on the wheels, leave the lug nuts masked until afterwards so they retain the shiny chrome finish. It makes for a great detail.

Note: The liquid mask is great stuff, but is sometimes difficult to remove if it has been left to cure too long. I will sometimes do the painting before the mask has dried completely, then remove it as soon as the paint has set enough to be handled.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by flat33 on Thursday, September 08, 2016 3:24 PM
Right, cheers i'l have a look at that stuff and thanks for the tips.
  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Thursday, September 08, 2016 5:57 PM

Wheels like this are pretty simple to do with plain old acrylic craft paint.

just brush it into the areas you want blacked out.

Don't have to be real careful because the acrylic paint will rub right off of the chrome with little effort with a tooth pick or a conical swab moistened with a little water.

I use the same stuff for grilles & a miriad of other detailing chores.

The Magnum wheels on my '65 Monaco were done using this method.

 

Steve

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
Posted by litespeedsae on Thursday, September 08, 2016 7:39 PM

Great post as I have a Fujimi 1969 Porsche 911S to build as well.The Fuch wheels are, in my opinion,essential to get right for these early Porsche cars.Watching this closely.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by flat33 on Friday, September 09, 2016 9:20 AM

so could i use a tamiya acrylic pot black would that work?

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, September 09, 2016 12:27 PM

flat33

so could i use a tamiya acrylic pot black would that work?

 

I'm not really sure about the Tamiya paints.

I don't use them.

The key is to find a paint that does not adhere well to the chrome until thoroughly cured & does not require any harsh thinners or chemicals to remove.

I use "Delta Ceramcoat" myself.

It's a very common craft acrylic paint that can be found in nearly any craft store.

I buy mine @ Hobby Lobby in a 2 oz. plastic bottle for a couple bucks.

It comes in a nearly endless array of colors, including metallics & pearls, & a bottle will last for years.

 

Steve

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by flat33 on Friday, September 09, 2016 2:38 PM

I just tried the method you suggested the tamiya stuff worked fine will post photos of the finished product once its dry thanks, Do you have any advice on aging engines or give them some more detail i just think covering mine in silver does not cut it, and yeh I did do the small bigs like belts ect im just not sure about the colour of the silver it looks too new?

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Goofy62 on Friday, September 09, 2016 7:52 PM

flat33

I just tried the method you suggested the tamiya stuff worked fine will post photos of the finished product once its dry thanks, Do you have any advice on aging engines or give them some more detail i just think covering mine in silver does not cut it, and yeh I did do the small bigs like belts ect im just not sure about the colour of the silver it looks too new?

 

I'm not your guy for that sort of technique.

I build all of my projects in a show room new style.

 

Steve

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 10:56 AM

You need to black wash that engine. Make a black wash by mixing a small quantity of acrylic black paint with acrylic thinner or rubbing alcohol to create a very thin wash. Start at about 10:1 ratio (ten parts thinner to one part paint), and adjust by adding more thinner or paint as required. Definately try this on a scrap assembly first to get the right mix ratio and develope your technique.

Dip a med size soft bristle brush into the wash and lay it liberally across the engine, transaxle, etc. Let the wash flow into the crevices. As it dries it may lighten somewhat, so it takes a bit of practice to get the technique right, but it is quite easy to do.

It works great on all underhood and chassis areas to give them a bit of a used look without making them look too grimy. I also use it on interiors, body parts such as grills etc, and especially on wheels. It can add a lot to the realism of the build, and you can build it up in layers as required. It can be also be used as a weathering technique by using various browns and grays.

This method can be used on top of enamals and lacquers without concern. Exercise caution if doing this on acrylics as the solvent in the wash may soften the paint. Some people use Tamiya smoke for the paint portion, and some use black ink. There is a product called The Detailer that is made for this purpose, presumably pre-thinned, but I haven't tried it. Tamiya also makes a product marketed towards the aircraft builders called something like Panel Line Accent Colour, but I haven't tried it yet either.

Power matters in the straights.
Lightness matters everywhere. - Colin Chapman

Trevor

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