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Suspension Lowering

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  • Member since
    February, 2012
Suspension Lowering
Posted by Vettarri550 on Sunday, August 21, 2016 9:18 PM

I have some kits like for example Revell 96' Mustang Cobra convertible that have too much of a "off road" stance where the front or rear sits too high. I've been wanting to fix it, but not sure where to start and how to do it. The kit does have fairly fat tires which probably has some factor in to it. Anyways fill me in on the best route to do this.

"A wise man once said forgivness is devine, but never pay full price for a late pizza" -Michelangelo Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Tampa, FL.
Posted by Jantrix on Monday, August 22, 2016 4:50 PM

There are as many ways to lower a car as there are types of suspension. And that is the data we need. I'm not a Mustang guy so bear with me. If this is a representation of the suspension in the kit then it's as simple as shortening the springs and lengthening the control arms. If it's some sort of independant rear suspension, then it's a whole new ball game.

If it looks more like this, you'll have to raise the upper control arms so the spindle mounts higher, alter the lower control arm and axles as need. Good luck.

Rob Geeked There is a nasty little four letter word for building something you're not interested in - work. And that's not what we do here. My Photo Album

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by Plowboy on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 3:50 PM

Up front, it's as simple as cutting the wheel mounting stub loose and relocating it higher on the spindle the amount you want to lower it. You can use crazy glue to glue it back on. I use Tamiya Extra Thin Cement for a good bond.

The rear is as simple as cutting the coil springs down the amount you want to lower it. You'll probably have to shorten the shocks also or find a shorter pair from your parts box.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2012
Posted by Vettarri550 on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 9:25 PM

Ok. Thanks for the info guys. 

"A wise man once said forgivness is devine, but never pay full price for a late pizza" -Michelangelo Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by jbwelda on Wednesday, August 24, 2016 5:42 PM

Like said, each kit is different and just because the 1:1 prototype can be lowered a certain way is no guarantee a given kit of the same car can be lowered prototypically. So with each kit certain decisions have to be made and certain concessions to the reality have to be dealt with. If you dont really care how things look underneath you can glue the top of the tires to the bottom of the fender well and even cut off the top of the tire so it will tuck up in there better. If you are more picky how it looks under there, then, as suggested, perhaps you can liberated the spindle from the control arms and raise it up, effectively lowering the car. Other times its fairly simple to mod the suspension just as prototypically you could to get it lower to the ground. Sometimes you do a combination of things and of course things like shock absorber length come into play. One problem i often run into is the suspension lowering is easy, its the inner fender wells or inner lip of the fender opening that are the problem. I often grind away clearance for a radical lowering job, which is what i most prefer. Sometimes lower profile tires or smaller wheels will help if appropriate to the car in question.

Most often i choose the path of least resistance but that is governed by whether i want the undercarriage to look realistic or not...if its a slammer then i just slam it but if i want to show the underneath then more care is needed. Sometimes its as easy as reversing the spindles either side to side or upside down, if the wheel mounting spindle is higher one way than the other.

In the front though, and many times in the back too, some thought will have to be given to what to do with the tie rod and/or control arms as they might not fit into the space allotted to them when lowered.

jb

 

 

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