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Texaco station in 1977

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  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Texaco station in 1977
Posted by Repstock on Sunday, March 02, 2014 3:45 PM

The real station was located a few blocks from where I grew up. It's in 1/25 scale. the walls are gatorboard covered with .060 styrene. It's hard to photograph white in normal room conditions, but here goes...

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Powell River, B.C.
Posted by CLASSIC770 on Sunday, March 02, 2014 4:54 PM

I'm there, big guy.  I gotta favorite this build.  Kids, BITD, this was a gas station.  No convenience store, best you could do was a pack of coffin nails(to roll up in your shirt), a warm soda, and a 'pine' air freshener(that ALWAYS gave me a nasty headache).  Oil in metal cans.  You sat in the car, whilst fresh-faced attendants pumped the gas(a kid's first real job), checked the dipstick, wiped the windshield, and gave you a complimentary glass or item of silverware free("Please sir, oh we beseech you, good sir, to buy our gas!")  Plus, they worked on cars!

Anyway, this is an inspiring first look!  What brand of fuel?

In the frozen land of Nador, they were forced to eat Robin’s minstrels. And there was much rejoicing. 

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by fifer on Sunday, March 02, 2014 5:14 PM

Yep , "You can trust your car to the man who wears the star".

Great Job.

Mike

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.
I wrote ‘happy’. 
They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”
-- John Lennon

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Powell River, B.C.
Posted by CLASSIC770 on Sunday, March 02, 2014 5:21 PM

I'd heard about 'You can trust your car to the man who wears the star."  But it never made sense to me - The local sheriff was an idiot when it came to cars!

In the frozen land of Nador, they were forced to eat Robin’s minstrels. And there was much rejoicing. 

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by fifer on Sunday, March 02, 2014 6:02 PM

LOL Yep, they are sometimes that way.

MIke

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.
I wrote ‘happy’. 
They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”
-- John Lennon

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posted by peanutgallery on Monday, March 03, 2014 1:57 PM

Very impressive building skills so far...Bow  There are numerous websites that sell accessories for 1/25  scale gas stations and repair garages. It all depends how much money and time you want to spend.  Please keep us updated on your  gas station.....

Dennis

 

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Monday, March 03, 2014 3:33 PM

Repstock, are you saying you're scratchbuilding this, measuring by photographs? If so, WOW. I'd really like to build the same... Regards, Csaba

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Monday, March 03, 2014 6:00 PM

There in a used car dealership across town that looked familiar. After checking the county auditor site, I discovered it had indeed been built in 1968 as a Texaco station. I visited it and measured everything. The exterior had no tower and the cladding had been covered, but the garage area still had the cladding and Texaco colors. Having used the measurements to create drawings, I added the missing pieces by studying photos. If you want something extremely specific, usually you have to make it yourself. I have a friend who intends to build a Gulf station.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Posted by oldscalemodeler on Monday, March 03, 2014 6:22 PM

Very clean, and very precise looking. I remember those Texaco stations fondly, although I usually bought my gas at the dinosaur station. I'll be following this one.

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by dcat1999 on Monday, March 03, 2014 9:13 PM

Don't forget to add the air hoses across the gas pump lanes so the cars make that "ding,ding" sound to get the attendant's attention. One of my first jobs as a teenager was working in one of these old gas stations. It was a Standard station, but your Texaco station brings back a lot of memories. Keep us posted on this build and the trip down memory lane.

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:55 AM

Repstock

There is a used car dealership across town that looked familiar. After checking the county auditor site, I discovered it had indeed been built in 1968 as a Texaco station. I visited it and measured everything. The exterior had no tower and the cladding had been covered, but the garage area still had the cladding and Texaco colors. Having used the measurements to create drawings, I added the missing pieces by studying photos. If you want something extremely specific, usually you have to make it yourself. I have a friend who intends to build a Gulf station.

Thumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up That's the way to do it! I really like and (although this may sound silly) respect this project. Regards, Csaba

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 12:23 PM

Added lights to the overhang. This is going to take awhile to finish.

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 12:44 PM

Cool. What's the power source?

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 4:36 PM

Idea Power source for all my LED lighting is a 12v regulated power supply.

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by shaun.s on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 5:33 PM

very cool, idea, way to use your resources,you have no idea how many of us out there remember these in one form or another. great work!!!!!!!!!! shaun.s.

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Thursday, March 06, 2014 1:42 AM

BTW, how did you make those windows? The green ones. --- Do you have a photo of pieces of the 'gatorboard' to show their structure/layers? If it is what I understand it is, what did you use cover the board edges? Thanks, Csaba

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Thursday, March 06, 2014 8:14 AM

Your question implies gatorboard is what you think it is... a foam core with hard wood veneer on either side. to answer your question, this is how I make a wall. First, I cut out and scribe the inside and outside of the wall (.060 styrene sheet). Next, I create .156 x .200 square rods by gluing two evergreen .156 x .100 rods together.(the gatorboard I use is about .200 thick, thus the need for .200 rods). With these I line the outside edge of one of the scribed panels. I then cut the gatorboard to fit inside the edged panel. I super glue the gatorboard to the inside of the styrene panel. When set, I super glue the other scribed panel to the exposed gatorboard side. I then run liquid cement around the outside edged to seal the scribed panels to the .200 square rods.

The short answer is: The edges of the gatorboard are covered by the .156 x .200 rods. I hope this made sense.

 

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Thursday, March 06, 2014 8:53 AM

Yes, thank you, it perfectly makes sense. I just thought gatorboard was foam plus styrene, not wood veneer. Anyway, I'll have to go find this stuff (what it's called here in Non-English and what sizes it's available in)... Regards, Csaba

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Thursday, March 06, 2014 10:43 AM

I just noticed I didn't answer your whole question. I made the windows with evergreen styrene strips. I laid out the pattern on a piece of flat styrene, glued down the window parts, then made a simple one piece mold with RTV. If you are exact enough, your molded pieces can go back to back against a piece of clear lexan, and the panes will line up perfectly.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by fifer on Thursday, March 06, 2014 2:01 PM

Thanks , That was the part I was trying to figure out.

Mike

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.
I wrote ‘happy’. 
They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”
-- John Lennon

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Friday, March 07, 2014 2:29 AM

Wow, thanks.

RE: 'I just noticed I didn't answer your whole question. ' - I thought I would just ask again next time a question comes up :-) That's a real professional way of making windows. Regards, Csaba

  • Member since
    March, 2008
  • From: Canada
Posted by smellyfatdude on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 12:44 PM

Looks identical to the Texaco that was near my parents house for years. Nice work! Bow

introducing a leaner, fresher smellyfatdude 

Next builds:

Dunno

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Saturday, March 22, 2014 8:45 PM

A little more progress. I'm using Dupli Color white acrylic lacquer for the building color. The little tower is more or less done.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Saturday, March 22, 2014 8:48 PM

  • Member since
    February, 2012
  • From: Central/Eastern Europe
Posted by felhasznaaloo on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:03 AM

This looks real serious... The blue line in the fascia board I guess is some light seeping thru from the soffit...

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 1:09 PM

I'll fix the light leaks as I paint it. I'm painting a wall at a time so the polishing doesn't overwhelm me. Right now the tower is painted, and the wall with the garage doors is painted. I have yet to add the green trim, "Service you can TRUST" letters, and two red stars.

By the way, carving letters is tedious work, don't care for it at all.

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Saturday, March 29, 2014 9:46 PM

The wall with the bays is complete, and is painted DupliColor white acrylic lacquer. The letters were carved from .060 styrene, and I'm glad they're done!

  • Member since
    November, 2013
Posted by fifer on Saturday, March 29, 2014 11:04 PM

Looks nicer every time I see it.

Mike

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.
I wrote ‘happy’. 
They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”
-- John Lennon

  • Member since
    February, 2005
  • From: Southeast Pennsylvania
Posted by peanutgallery on Monday, March 31, 2014 6:00 PM

Repstock...The more I see your work, the more I hope you take your time building this station. I think you could be on to having a show winning diorama when completed..

Dennis

 

  • Member since
    February, 2009
  • From: Galloway, Ohio
Posted by Repstock on Monday, March 31, 2014 8:07 PM

I appreciate the kind words and encouragement. It helps keep me motivated. Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to respond!

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