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BMW R90S in 1:6 scale

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  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
BMW R90S in 1:6 scale
Posted by eajonesgue on Friday, November 01, 2013 10:46 AM

I’ve never posted a Work in Progress (WIP) item on this forum and thought I would give it a try for this project.

This year our local model club (Guelph Plastic Modellers Group) decided to have a BIG model challenge.  You have to build a model that was either in a large scale or the final model is big or is from the largest model box that you have.  You must finish by 11:59 pm Dec 31, 2013 and those that did not complete had to forfeit $20 and endure the razzing of the members for the next year.

My choice was pretty easy as I had purchased this 1:6 scale Tamiya BMW R90S which was a scale I had never built and it was easily the largest model box I have.  I originally bought the kit the far-fetched idea of building a model of my 1979 BMW R100 motorcycle.  It would involve scratchbuilding the cast aluminum snowflake pattern wheels, a full aftermarket fairing, single seat and sidebags. . . . as I said, a far-fetched idea. 

I also thought about doing a model of the 1976 winning Daytona motorcycle, either the actual bike, or the replica stored at the AMA museum (see photo and description at  http://www.motorcyclemuseum.org/asp/classics/bike.asp?id=41)  However, that would again involve a lot of scratchbuilding and with the deadline we had, I didn’t think it was possible.

WIP photos to follow this weekend.

 

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Saturday, November 02, 2013 1:06 PM

Back in the early summer, I assembled the gas tank halves, cleaned up the seam and prepared all the body parts for paint.  White Tamiya primer, straight from the can was applied and after a gentle sanding I was ready for my new fast painting technique.  Tamiya Mica Silver was sprayed from the can in 3 coats – light, medium and heavy – 15-20 minutes apart.  This was followed by clear Tamiya orange lacquer, decanted from the can and airbrushed.  Again, 4 coats were applied, in 15-20 minute intervals to get the right coverage and fading between the silver and the orange.  Right after that, 3 coats of Tamiya clear were applied straight from the can in light, medium and heavy coats.  After waiting just 11 hours (overnight), the paint was ‘polished’ using Novus #2 and a soft cloth.

The one thing about using a clear, tinted lacquer is that I found it tricky to get an even colour and depth to the orange, especially on the horizontal surface of the gas tank.  The more paint you put on, the darker the orange became and it was tricky to get the colour even.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Saturday, November 02, 2013 1:17 PM

The next step, done over the previous two weeks, was to prepare all the parts for black paint, mostly frame parts.  I wanted to replace most of the molded bolt heads with metal or plastic replacements to dress the model up a bit.  The molded in nuts were removed from various spots on the frame and kickstand and metal replacements fitted.  These will be added during final assembly.  Below are some of photos of the parts being prepared for painting. 

The flange to attach the exhaust pipes was carefully sawed off and instead it was glued to the pipes.  This is how it is on the real bike.  Some putty was needed for a few of the frame joints.

One of the cross tubes on the kickstand was replaced with 2 mm diameter styrene rod. 

One detail missing on the kit is the pinch bolt for the rear axle.  Styrene tube fixed this and a photoetch saw was used to cut the slit on the end of the swing arm.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: The Great Northwest (SPOKANE)
Posted by Space Cowboy on Saturday, November 02, 2013 10:03 PM

You are doing an outstanding job. Keep it coming...........

(I Love It When A Plan Comes Together) Hannibal Smith.

http://s116.photobucket.com/albums/o33/moose5147/

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Friday, November 08, 2013 12:23 PM

I meant to get this loaded last weekend when I was working on the front forks.

The design of the front fork is such that the two halves, as well as the front brake caliper, either need to be painted before assembly or some tricky masking done afterwards.  I was able to modify the parts so that the brake caliper and fork sliders could be attached after the fork halves were partly assembled.  The following is the modifications:

-          Remove pin inside of fork which holds the brass inside slider in place

-          Drill a 2 mm hole on the other fork piece, opposite to the pin location, it is conveniently marked with an ejection pin.  After final assembly, a 2 mm rod will be pushed through the hole, and through the matching hole in the brass slider to hold it in place

-          File off the upper step in the inside of the fork.  It serves to stop the slider from bottoming out, something that is not really needed.

-          Taper the bottom slip ring so that it can slide a little easier into the fork (not shown)

-          Dry assemble the fork with the brake caliper and drill the bottom of the fork through the brake caliper with a 2 mm drill.  This will allow a 2 mm rod to be used to secure the brake caliper after everything has been painted.

Glue the two fork halves together only at the bottom portion.  Finishing and painting of the fork can now be done.  Assembly is pretty straight forward – push the assembled fork slider down the fork tube, which will separate at the unglued top part, until it clicks into place.  Then line up the hole in the fork with the hole in the brass slider and secure with a 2 mm diameter rod.  Line up the brake caliper and slide a long 2 mm plastic rod to secure.  Only the bottom bolt head needs to be finished.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    April, 2005
  • From: Caputh, Germany
Posted by modelmarc on Saturday, November 09, 2013 7:23 AM

Great work so far! Really like your choice of color and the execution is superb! Look forward to progress.

Marc

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Monday, November 11, 2013 5:40 PM

The gloss black parts have been drying for a week now.  The paint was Tamiya gloss black lacquer straight from the can, no primer.  Because the parts are so big, using the can didn't result in too much overspray.

I also got some work on the engine - filling some sink marks and blending in the engine vent piece on the very top.  The parts are just dry fitted for now as I want to use different shades of Alclad for the different parts.  The seams that you see won't be filled in as they are mating surfaces for the various engine parts (right upper parts cover the air cleaner, right lower part is the transmission.  I'm still experimenting on ways to get a cast metal surface on these parts - stay tuned.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Sunday, November 17, 2013 5:48 PM

Not a whole lot of progress worth showing for this week - we've had some nice weather the last couple of weekends and I've taken advantage to play some late season golf. 

Most of the week has been spent prepping all the parts that will be painted in metallic shades.  There are a lot of parts and they are all big, so the sanding of seams is quite lengthy.  I did airbrush the wheel hubs Tamiya Metallic Grey acrylic.  The front brake disks were masked and within 20 minutes of putting the paint on, I rubbed the paint off the rivets using a toothpick with a concave end.  Bolts will be eventually brush painted bright silver.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Sunday, November 24, 2013 3:55 PM

Some more updates this week. The rear brake arm was replaced with a threaded brass rod and some craft wire to replace the spring.

In the interest of saving time, I decided not to replace the plastic molded spokes with wire.  However, I wanted to tone down the chrome on them.  Brush painting would not give a consistent finish and was trying to decide how to mask the rim for airbrushing - Silly Putty to the rescue!  The spokes were airbrushed with Testors clear flat acrylic.

The final drive was spruced up a bit with a set screw fill plug, a drain plug screw and another screw at the joint where it's attached to the swing arm.  The set screw was a piece of 0.5 mm styrene sheet with a hex shaped punched in it and then a round punchwas used.  The other two screws were Plastruct hex rod.

The carbs are joined to the cylinder heads with large clamps, similar to hose clamps.  I decided to replace the molde in parts with aluminum pieces.  Some aluminum rod had a hole drilled in it and then cut off into 0.5 mm thick rings.  This should help detail the carbs, as well as not having to worry about cleaning up all the joints.

The rear of the transmission also had some details added:

- far right is the new attachment point for the negative cable from the battery

- the clutch arm was removed and a piece of aluminum rod used for the pivot point

- styrene rod and some stainless steel fishing line leader was used for the cable, along with an additional styrene piece added to the transmission casing.

I have a tendency to rush into painting without making sure all the construction is completed.  This leaves me during final assembly drilling holes and things in all the freshly painted parts - a recipe for disaster.  So I'm taking my time doing all the little detail parts before getting out the airbrush.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Sunday, December 01, 2013 3:29 PM

The pushrod tubes, located under the cylinder heads were modified by replacing the tube with polished aluminum rod.  The larger end will be painted silver and flat black.

I managed to paint the majority of the metallic parts this afternoon.  First, I had to experiment with getting a rough textured surface to simulate the cast aluminum look.  I tried brushing on Tamiya thick glue and while it was drying, stippling it with a cheap paintbrush.  This gave a nice bumpy surface, but in 1:6 scale was actually too rough.  I ended up doing something similar to what they suggested in the instructions:

- spray one part with Tamiya primer

- while still wet, stipple with a cheap, plastic bristle paintbrush

Once painted with Alclad, it had just enough roughness.  Below are most of the metallic parts in the spray booth.  Alclad aluminum, duraluminum, dark aluminum and steel were used.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 02, 2013 7:59 AM

Beautiful workmanship.  Thanks for all of the great documentation.  I'm going to be building a Norton Commando from the old Heller kit and will try some of your finishing techniques.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Sunday, December 08, 2013 6:24 PM

I got some of the painted parts put together in sub-assemblies this week and a second pass at metallic painting (for the stuff I missed the first time.  The exhaust pipes have a metal clamp that attaches to the frame.  I decided to paint it Alclad aluminum to distinguish from the chrome plated pipes.  This entailed a bit of masking.  I haven't decided whether I will use some clear paints to add heat stains to the exhaust pipes.

Here are a couple of really detailed photos showing how the 'bumpy' paint technique turned out on the rear drive.  A few places were a little rougher than I wanted but all in all I like the results.

Don't know how much I'll get done this week as I have an out of town business meeting.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Wednesday, January 01, 2014 4:25 PM

Well, I made the deadline (sort of).  The major components were assembled late yesterday afternoon and I took this photo.  There are still a few minor details to add and I will post additional photos once the model is complete.  I'm still debating on whether to add heat stains to the exhaust pipes.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 02, 2014 11:56 AM

Turned out really nice.  Looks like you throw a leg over and take off.

  • Member since
    January, 2011
Posted by Zeke on Monday, January 13, 2014 7:10 PM

Hi Evan, I saw you building this at the Toronto mototcycle show a couple of weeks ago.  Absolutely amazing job you did on this! I'm starting the Tamiya Ducati 916 and just wish I could devote half the time and energy that you put into the BMW. One of these days I'll get up to one of your monthly meetings to get more tips and advice.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by eajonesgue on Saturday, January 18, 2014 11:11 AM

Zeke

Glad you liked the BMW.  I finally got all the parts together - I misplaced the left footpeg for a couple of weeks.  The exhaust pipes received the exhaust blue stain using Tamiya transparent acrylics. Below are additional photos.

For those of you who wish to build the model I have two things to look out for:

1) I left off the air cleaner cover when the engine was installed in the frame.  I know on my real bike there is always some fiddling to get the carbs and intake tubes lined up just right.  This was not a good idea for the model.  The tubes kept trying to push the cover up and back and I finally had to resort to epoxy glue to get it to stay on.  I would recommend attaching the air cleaner cover parts very securely before installing the engine (just like the instructions)

2) I found during final assembly that the mufflers interfered with the rear axle on both sides.  Either gentle bending outward of the rear footpegs mounting plate or a longer length mounting plate on the muffler would help avoid this problem.

Evan Jones http://www.eajonesgue.com/scalemodels
  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by drodg1968 on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 1:26 PM

Beautiful job

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