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Testors1:9 Custom HD-FXSTS - Finished Pics 9-13-2012

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  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Testors1:9 Custom HD-FXSTS - Finished Pics 9-13-2012
Posted by ModelsByMas on Saturday, July 14, 2012 9:03 PM

I started this build awhile back and took photos of any custom built parts, or any changes I made to the stock project and any tips I had as the Work Progressed.

Any ideas or comments you have will be greatly appreciated and encouraged.

The first thing I found that was a bit challenging with the build was fitting the Front and Rear Rims together. When I fitted them it seemed that when I took off the chrome on the inner side of the rims where the glue was to go, it left a gap and the glue surface would not fit together properly. I took these photos to show how I remedied this problem.

Everything fit normally after this procedure.

I hope this helps someone that has the same problem.

Next step, Fitting the Cylinders together so the fins meet properly;

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Sunday, July 15, 2012 3:01 AM

After dry fitting the cylinder halves, I noticed that the fins did not line up and was very noticeable when fitted together as shown in the photos.

After taking the cylinder halves back apart, to match them up, I had to cut off the factory alignment pins as shown in the next pic. This is something that really doesn't have to be done and everything would fit together just fine, but under close scrutiny a trained eye might notice the cylinders are cock-eye, as my pops always would say when something was crooked in one way or an other.

After the factory pins are gone, the next step that I have done in the next pic is not necessary, but if you want them to be perfect, like so many modelers are, you can either skip drilling new pilot pin holes and throw the glue to it and cross your fingers, or drill the new hole and place a new pilot & pin so you can do more than just hope for the best. After placing the new pins, the fins might not be exactly aligned but they should be close enough that they can be cleaned up with a needle file or hobby knife as shown in the next few pics.


Before you try mounting the cylinders to the crank cases, the surface that fits to the cases might not be flat after re-alignment as shown in the above photo. If the surface is not flat, it should be flattened as shown below, so the cylinders fit properly to the cases.

Again, I hope these tips help with a model that someone else is getting ready to assemble.

Next step is to dry fit the Top End, Manifold and Carburetor.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Sunday, July 15, 2012 3:52 PM

Well this next part of the kit is fairly straight forward but with having problems with alignment trouble in the two prior steps I figure I should just stay with the plan and go ahead with dry fitting and alignment of the Top End as well. So here are a couple photos of how my project is going. In the last photo you will be able to see a few of the things I did to the carburetor after fitting and before the assembly process.




Not a lot of detail added to the carb, just a couple pieces of tin shaped like the throttle parts on the full scale carb and I also made a spring from some different color wire to hopefully make it more noticeable when the project is finished.


The next part of the build has to do with the crank cases so I will pay special attention to any mold lines and other pieces of extra plastic so fitting goes fairly smooth.

This image shows how the cases fit together before flat sanding and fitting was done.

This next image shows the cases after sanding and fitting. It is easy to see the difference between taking time to fit and align the parts and not taking the time to fit and align. It is easy to say that taking just a few minutes to sand and fit the parts makes all the difference in the end.

The next step is to place the cylinder into the crank casses, be sure to use a flat file or sandpaper file to flatten the surfaces of the casses as shown.


Thank you all for taking time to check out my build. It probably seems boring and that it looks like a regular stock build but believe me, from here on out there should be quite a bit more customizing going on, Please stay tuned.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Euless, Tx.
Posted by DEUCE1932 on Monday, July 16, 2012 5:49 AM

Looks great so far!! Love the attention your giving to the tiny details!!

Scott

Current Projects: 1991 Ford Dually

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Wednesday, July 18, 2012 2:03 PM

Thanks a lot for taking a looks and posting a little about the build, I know it isn't much yet but I hope it will get better soon as I start getting some more photos posted of the work that's been going on Big Smile
_________________________________________________________________

So I'll start this 6th step about fitting and assembly of the Swing Arm on the bike.
I started off by making sure all the mold line were gone and then I turned my attention toward the ride height of the bike. I could see on the cover of the box that I wanted the bike to sit lower and the only way to adjust the ride on the 1:1 bike is to adjust the push on the springs that mount on the Swing arm. To do this instead of adding push which would have raised the bike I cut some of the spring away so the spring wasn't pushing so hard which lowered the bike as shown in the photo below.

Next step is Assembling and Customizing the frame;

Next step I will get rid of the big sock harley seat and construct one of my own from peices of scrap styrene as shown in the next few images.

I started of by tracing the first peice of styrene so it was the same shape as the frame back to the finder. I then cut a smaller peice and glued it to the larger peice so the seat pan it's self would fit in the battery hole that is in the frame as shown.

As you can see I have stretched the leather around the seat and gathered it in the back and then
used small alligator clips to hold the leather tight in the back of the seat and then I laid the entire
thing aside to dry.

While it was still wet, I use the blunt side of a pair of sissors and pressed it down into the groove I carved in the top of the styrene seat so it would resemble the seam of the seat after the leather was dry.
Notice the leather is still gathered in the back.

After the leather has dried you can cut off the excess leather in the back with a pair of scissors. Be sure it is dry though or the leather will return to its prior shape.

Next I will use a hobby knife to cut off the excess leather in the back of the seat so it will sit flatter against the finder of the bike as shown.

As you can see in the image below the differance between the stock seat and the scratch built one. You might also notice that there are two seat covers, this is because I made an extra one, one is a plain surface and one has flames rubbed into the surface of the leather while it was still wet.

This is the plain seat cover.

And as you can see, this is the one with the flames rubbed into the leather.

I decided to use the smooth seat cover  on the bike so it would look cleaner. I will post more as it comes along.
Next is making a smaller tank as I do not want the stock 5 gallon fat-bob tanks on the bike.

Thank you for taking time to look at how it is coming along.

Back to work...

Tom Douglas (ModelByMas)

Last build = My 3 Window Deuce Hot Rod

My Sutterfly Scale Site = Mas's World of Scale Auto Racing

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Friday, July 20, 2012 11:14 AM

This next section is on making a Sportster take from scratch.

Well it is finally starting to look like something. I sorta like how the tank turned out, I like it a lot more than the stock Fat-bobs anyway LOL.

Next step is going to be the battery box and the wiring.

Thank you for checking it out.  Only one reply, MMMM makes me think no one likes the way I am doing it or something  Confused

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Euless, Tx.
Posted by DEUCE1932 on Friday, July 20, 2012 1:50 PM

It doesn't matter if other people like it or not as long as you like it. I think it is awesome that you are posting your WIP as well as making it a how-to for people that might want to do the same. Amazing work man!!!

Current Projects: 1991 Ford Dually

  • Member since
    May, 2008
Posted by 351gt on Saturday, July 21, 2012 5:56 PM

Great build. I bought one of these kits when they came out 20 years ago. I open the box and noticed the way the cylinders went together and lost interest. Seeing your build and scratch building is making me think differently about that kit. I look forward to seeing this build completed.

  • Member since
    November, 2004
  • From: Lubbock, TX
Posted by shadetree on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 9:59 AM

Mas,

Great work as always. Keep it up

Marc

  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by Iborg on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 5:17 PM

This is a great build.....I'll be watching it.

Mike

  • Member since
    June, 2010
  • From: Penha, SC - Brazil
Posted by Joca on Thursday, August 09, 2012 3:51 PM

Fascinating job...watching every episode...keep'on the excellent working...!!!

Regards,

Joca  

"There's no substitute for cubic inches"

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Thursday, August 09, 2012 7:58 PM

It doesn't matter if other people like it or not as long as you like it. I think it is awesome that you are posting your WIP as well as making it a how-to for people that might want to do the same. Amazing work man!!!

Current Projects: 1/8th Scale 32' Ford Roadster.......

Thanks for the nice words of encouragement '', What you say about other people liking it is so very true, as some of the steps I have posted, I myself have a hard time liking them because they are so frivolous, but then when I took a step back, and looked at it from an angle that a beginner, well like me would take, And then I even looked at it as a youngster that has never seen these type steps before would see them, and it made all the differance in the world, and then I reminded myself of my own problem, you see I personally have a "Hand Tremor" problem; which means that I have a hard time keeping my right hand completely still. It does it while I'm not thinking about it. But when I look at my hand, and think about it wiggling, the tremors stop almost completely, and with just a little more concentration, my hands stop trembling, and thank the lord, I can place together some of the smallest parts that, even myself can barely understand how and why it happens as it does, but it does "Well Most of the time" and I can get most things done slowly but surely.

Anyway Scott, Thank You for your moral support my Friend, it means so much that you could never know..

Sincerely;

Tom Douglas  aka "Mas"

**************************************************************************

Great build. I bought one of these kits when they came out 20 years ago. I open the box and noticed the way the cylinders went together and lost interest. Seeing your build and scratch building is making me think differently about that kit. I look forward to seeing this build completed........

Thank You too for the great words of reinforcement, . I had not realized that it has been 20 years since this kit was released to the public, wow how time flies. When I opened my box I liked it so much, that I bought the other three of the 4 available from a lady on ebay, but of course not at retail price. I was lucky enough to find a lady on ebay that was liquidating some stuff left over from a divorce. Seems her husband owned a hobby shop in which her payment was a certain percentage of the poor guys inventory and was able to talk her down a little bit and picked up all four Testors HD FXSTS kits for $40.00 total.

I'm happy that my build might be giving you somewhat of a boost in your thoughts about the kit you have, and hope that I will be commenting about your build of the Testors HD FXSTS one of these dayz bud.

Regards:

Tom Douglas "Mas"

**************************************************************************

Mas,

Great work as always. Keep it up

Marc........

Thank You for your post shadetree   I will "Keep It Up" as long as I can man, well the doctor said to call if I "Keep it up" longer than four hours Man, ya know,  but I'ii do my best just the same okay Stick out tongue

Just Kidding Man, Thank You for your post Pal.

All the best;

Tom Douglas "Mas"

**************************************************************************

This is a great build.....I'll be watching it.

Mike........

Thank You for taking time to post, , as I have said before, every post means a lot to me because it helps "Keep It Up" if ya know what I mean  LOL..   NNaa  I really care about each and every person that takes time to post as it gives me the moral support inside to keep building, cause when no-one posts it makes me feel sorta bad inside and then I lag on doing any building and that is not a good feeling if ya know what I mean.

Anyway! Thanks again;

Tom Douglas "Mas"

**************************************************************************

Fascinating job...watching every episode...keep'on the excellent working...!!!

Regards,

Joca  

"There's no substitute for cubic inches"................

I Hadn't thought that a model kit, or at least one of my kits, that can sometimes take almost a year to put together to be refereed to as Fantastic! But Heck, I appreciated the gesture all the same Man. I just hope I can make the rest of the project a little bit more fantastic than the first part just for you , Okay Man!!


All the best to ya Man!

Tom Douglas "Mas"
*************************************************************************
*************************************************************************

Well I am just about ready to post a couple more sections, the first I think will be the Battery Box....  Coming very soon!

Thank a bunch my friends!! 

"Mas"

  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by Iborg on Thursday, August 09, 2012 9:59 PM

This is a great job! You've done a great job on a kit that is rarely seen built. I look forward to seeing this one progress.

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Friday, August 10, 2012 8:29 PM

Thanks Iborg, I am going to get on the next steps towards getting just a little closer to the end which is going to cover the Oil Bag & Battery Box and putting power to the the Oil Bag to power-up the Head Light.

You might notice the clear orange colored box with the spring in it, This part originally was one of those clip-on reading lights that they sometimes sell at the 99 cent stores. I just cut the parts off that was not needed so it would fit in the Oil Bag.

Now that the batteries are installed and the Oil Bag is in place
I need to put the Head Light together so I can make sure that I get it wired right.



Well that is about it for now, I hope to have a few more picks posted soon as the scratch built clutch and belt drive is starting to come together.

If anyone has a question or comment please don't hesitate to post it.

Thank you all for taking time to see how this mess is coming along.

My best to you all;

Tom Douglas "Mas"

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Saturday, August 18, 2012 8:07 PM

So I've had some time to get a few items setup that I can get a bit closer towards the end of a couple of building sections.


This first section will be about building the Ape Hanger Handle Bars and also some things about putting the short Springer Front end on the frame.


THE HANDLE BARS;
As you will see in the second photo, I have used a peice of aluminum that is intended to be the handle bars, I have also pushed a piece of braising rod into the inside of the aluminum so that when I go to bend it, the aluminum will not kink or crack.  The spring will also help leep a clean bend in the aluminum tubing, I used a piece old spring from a speedometer cable to do the bending, this will work fine but if you can drop by a Harbor Fright store they have a spring tubing bender set that will do a better for just a few dollars.

As you can see, I drew out the handle bars on a sheet of paper using the stock handle bars and front suspension so I would have a guide to go by.

When I finished the handle bars, it was time to work on the front end. I could have just slapped on thee stock Springer that came with the Testors kit but I thought that the bike might sit a bit too high in the front for the style of bike that I was trying to create and so I derided to look elsewhere for the front end that I wanted. I didn't have to look very far as I had an old ERTL, HD WLA build that had been sitting in a box in my garage for years. I was lucky because the springer on the ERTL bike was not as long as the springer that was in the Testors kit had in it. The only problem was that the new Testors front end was chromed and the springer from the ERTL kit was painted silver. But as we all know, Alclad paint has a nice chrome paint that looks almost like real chrome and so that is the way I went.e

In this next photo, you might be able to tell the difference between the stock Testors springer parts and the shorter ASCI/ERTAL springer parts. The older parts are outlined in green to make it easier for you guys can see the difference in the two.

The next two steps are building the clutch plates and bell, and after that I will explain how to scratch build the Harley Davidson inner side plate, the clutch, and the front belt pulley and the rest of the belt drive.

I am sorry that my time is short right now but I will do what I can to get back over here to finish writing the rest of the instructions on the Clutch & the scratch built belt drive.; I hope these photos will do for now but I am busy and need to get more done so I can keep working on my other projects.

Take care my friends, until next time.

"Tom"

  • Member since
    November, 2003
Posted by Iborg on Saturday, August 18, 2012 10:19 PM

I wonder how much of what you've done could be applied to the Revell Harley?  This is a very impressive build.

Mike

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Thursday, September 06, 2012 9:40 PM

Iborg

I wonder how much of what you've done could be applied to the Revell Harley?  This is a very impressive build.

Mike

Thanks for the post Mike!, I have all of the Revell Kustom Chopper motorcycle kits and two of the Torch kits. I got them all on SlezzBay when they first came out just cause I thought getting the entire line of bikes would be a good investment in Revell, but I have yet to build one of them. I have opened the extra Torch kit that I have, to look at what is there so I could answer your question, and from what I see, other than maybe the cylinders & engine assembly, and the wiring with the button batteries for working lights would be harder, (which I have been having trouble getting to work properly on this larger 1:9 th FXSTS build) but to me it seems as tho the Revell 1:12th scale Harley s looks pretty much just as easy to build some sort of different custom seat, tank(s) and such that you might like better than what the kits offers, and as for the clutch and the open belt drive goes, it is just about already made to order if the open belt drive is more to your fancy. :)

It all depends on what your likes & dis-likes are and how much effort you feel like putting into the model if ya know what I mean. I made this Custom FXSTS with the shorter ERTL WLA springer front end to shorten the stance on this bike. I have plans to build the ERTL 6200 WL Civilian 1:9th scale kit after this one because I used to ride one of the WLA Hardtail Flatheads when I was younger, and wanted to use the longer springer front end from the Testors FXSTS kit because my old bike was stretched in the tails legs 4" and the springer that I had on it was 8" over stock with a raked neck of what degree I don't remember, but I wanted the longer springer for the WLA Flathead build so it was closer to the bike I used to ride. I stretched the frame  on my WLA Flathead so I could add the old style "rapp-around oil tank" under the seat, behind the rear down leg.  That way I was able to move the oil from being in the right side Fat Tank, down under the seat and put a "T" joint in the fuel line so I would have fuel coming to the carb from both Fat Tanks, which raised the maxumum fuel amount from 1.5 gallons to 3 gallons. After the switch, I could ride from Ventura Cal. to Disneyland and back on one fill-up (214 miles), and that was back when gas was only 24.9 cents a gallon.  LOL

Anyway sorry for the late reply, am getting ready to post the latest photos of the Testors Custom FXSTS WIP.

My best to ya  "Mas"

P.S. this my old bike and me in 1976

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Friday, September 07, 2012 12:46 PM

Well these next photos shows the frame with a white base-coat with traditional style flames. I did the base coat first and then used the negative side of the flame mask to cover the white so I could airbrush the different colors in the flames. (sorry I didn't get some pics while I was doing the masking process, just slipped my mind)

The next step will be to use the flame mask part that covers up the colors of the flame, so I can spray the Cobalt Blue that the bike will end up being.

Now comes a light sanding to take off any light burs that the masking tape might have left and then comes the Cobalt Metal Blue.

Here is the frame and the swing arm after the final top coat of blue.


This pic shows the frame and tank, you might be able to just barley see the masking tape that is covering up the flames that are on the tank.


Next came a day of drying, and then off comes the masking tape to reveal the flames as you can see in this next pic.

Now come about a week for the clear coat to dray real good so no finger prints start showing up as the assembly process starts. That is when it will hopefully start looking like something more than a bunch of home made parts LOL..
See you all when it drys  :)

Thank you all again for taking time to see how this mess is coming together. the support means a lot.

"Mas"

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Brooklyn NY
Posted by highwayman9674 on Monday, September 10, 2012 9:59 PM

WOW!!!this is one hell of a build!!I am a fan :D

"ITS BETTER TO LIVE ONE DAY AS A LION THEN THE REST OF YOUR LIFE AS A LAMB" from the desk of Dr. S.G.Oppenheimer Sr.
  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: Ventura California
Posted by ModelsByMas on Thursday, September 13, 2012 5:40 AM

Thanks for your post HighwayMan!!

Well it has been drying long enough so I did a few things to it, as shown in the pics below.

So it is getting so'oo close to the end that I spending all night up to finish it.

And it is no longer a Work In Progress, it was finished this morning at about 2:30 am.

I hope it ended up being what all of you great folks that have been watching wanted it to be, I have enjoyed it all the way through..

I appreciate all of your posts. Each and every post made a difference in the outcome of this project, or it would have probably been thrown in the scrap heap half way through and I thank you all.

All my best to you all;

Tom Douglas
aka "Mas"

Ventura California


Me and a friend at the GoodGuys in Pomona Ca with The Winged Express behind, and the ashes of the origanal driver "Willie Borsch" in the urn on my lap.

  • Member since
    May, 2010
Posted by krow113 on Thursday, September 13, 2012 3:01 PM

Cool stance!

Thank You ; Krow113

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