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Tesla Model 3

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  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Tesla Model 3
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Monday, September 24, 2018 3:06 AM

Completed this for now. It is 3D printed on my Flashforge Finder. i'm thinking i'd like to re-print the wheels for separate tire/rim as i found it hard to define them, and just painted them by hand. The chrome is bare metal foil, the paint is Tamiya metallic red, which is very nice under tamiya clear coat. i might also re-do the glass, as the brush strokes are still visible. How does 3d printing measure up? i'd put it about on-par with resin casting. not as sharp or detailed as styrene injection and quite a lot of clean up required. It's a good way to get subjects not available in scale, but if  you can't find a 3d mesh, you have to create your own to print.





Tesla Model by aus_mus, on Flickr

  • Member since
    February, 2008
Posted by justmike on Monday, September 24, 2018 10:58 AM

I'll be showing this to a friend of mine. He has one on order and what you've done will interest him

Feelings are like scents: The more they are analyzed, the worse they smell.
  • Member since
    February, 2008
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by gbk1 on Monday, September 24, 2018 11:41 AM

I looked up the printer you used and the manufacturer sells it for $299.00 + shipping. That's what we used to pay for simple 2D home color printers 10-15 years ago. Did you have to purchase the 3D file you printed? If so that would be the equivalent to buying a model kit. Or perhaps it's out there as a free file!

In any case the result is quite nice and shows we're getting closer and closer to a practical new form of modeling where we pay for the output file and assume responsiblility for all the time, materials, and capital equipment to make the real world output, including the quality of the intermediate version (the kit "parts", as it were). Kind of like we buy music these days...

In the case of music the ultimate cost of an "album" has to include pro-rated download costs, storage costs, and the utility value to us of the "lost" album art and liner notes. A question to ask ourselves, assuming one day high quality, high resolution output at a very low cost will be available to us (kind of like today's relatively high speed color printers), is what will we give up in utility value for the box, box art, instructions, and all that shiny plastic? What will be the offset to that? Perhaps it will be the advent of subjects never before seen in scale at relatively low cost. And who will be the Model Factory Hiro of 3D output?

Bernard Kron Keep On Buildin'

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 2:29 AM

gbk1
Did you have to purchase the 3D file you printed? If so that would be the equivalent to buying a model kit. Or perhaps it's out there as a free file!

In this case, the model was free, but "you get what you pay for" is especially true in 3D models. Much of the 'free' stuff is pretty low quality, a lot of stuff is not intended to be printable as well.

  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Canberra, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Monday, October 15, 2018 4:07 AM

I decided to go back and reprint the wheels. first, i edited the wheel mesh to separate the tire and rim and brake-disk in 3d studio max. This took about 2 weeks of messing up the mesh several times and having to restart the process. Then they were printed and painted separately. i also re-oriented them to print with the face at the top which resulted in cleaner spokes. overall i'm much happer and it definitely looks better than my shaky hand painted tires. I may next go back and repaint the windows with spray paint instead of brushing them on.

Tesla Model

by aus_mus, on Flickr
  • Member since
    March, 2006
  • From: Spring, Tx
Posted by modelcarjr on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:50 AM

Aussie, the reprinted wheels look great and overall the printed model looks great! I'm still trying to master right click/ left click! Nice work! CoolThumbs Up 

If you cannot have a good time, what kinda time can you have? JR

Next on the bench:  Another 1970 Hemi 'Cuda, 1958 Chevy Impala, 1987 Buick GNX, 1950 Chevy Pick-up, Indy Reynard, 1965 Corvette, probably not in this order.

  • Member since
    October, 2008
Posted by oldcarguy on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 9:29 AM

Hi;

 I like your effort .

    Why don't you set the windows and side pillar in a little . Then , over lay them with .010 sheet parts . That way you only have to worry as to what color you paint the windows . Cement these parts on the painted surface with Jewelers glue or Gorilla Clear glue .

gjgeracci

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