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My ICM Model T!

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  • Member since
    September, 2011
My ICM Model T!
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 2:51 PM

This is my ICM 1913 Model T Ford Runabout.  It's done in dark blue (that was the body color used on Ford runabouts (OK, roadsters) in 1913--nearly a year before Ford standardized on black cars only.  Fully detailed, inside, outside, top and bottom, left to right.

1913 Ford Runabout

  • Member since
    June, 2015
Posted by dimaxion on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 3:36 AM

You know I am admiring this . She's a real beauty Art . Would someone drive me around in this please ?   Thanx .. 

  • Member since
    June, 2004
Posted by Tom99 on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 6:16 AM
Very nice.
  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 1:38 PM

Very nice,is it 16th or 24th?

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 3:23 PM

mini man

Very nice,is it 16th or 24th?

 

1/24 scale.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 5:09 PM

She's a real Beauty Art.

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by mini man on Thursday, January 19, 2017 1:21 PM

Arthur Anderson

 

 
mini man

Very nice,is it 16th or 24th?

 

 

 

1/24 scale.

 

Cheers.Big Smile

Will build most anything,love American cars muscle etc.Britishvehicles are a buzz too,trucks are great - want to do a jet truck,building parts up...

Nigel.

 

U.K.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Thursday, January 19, 2017 4:37 PM

mini man

 

 
Arthur Anderson

 

 
mini man

Very nice,is it 16th or 24th?

 

 

 

1/24 scale.

 

 

 

Cheers.Big Smile

 

It's the exquisite ICM kit, which is 1/24 scale.

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Thursday, January 19, 2017 4:50 PM

Any engine and chassis pics by chance?

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: the redlands, Fl
Posted by crown r n 7 on Thursday, January 19, 2017 5:49 PM

Thats  beautifully done all around . Yes

Niko

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Friday, January 20, 2017 10:04 AM

[quote user="midnightprowler"]

Any engine and chassis pics by chance?

 https://images57.fotki.com/v139/filedmXJ/b167c/4/43743/3168549/ICMModelT44.jpg
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Bombala, Australia
Posted by aussiemuscle308 on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 11:52 PM

It looks fabulous. it's a pity we don't see more of these.

Arthur Anderson

before Ford standardized on black cars only.

that never actually happened.

  • Member since
    September, 2011
Posted by Arthur Anderson on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 3:37 PM

aussiemuscle308

It looks fabulous. it's a pity we don't see more of these.

 

 
Arthur Anderson

before Ford standardized on black cars only.

 

 

that never actually happened.

 

Yes it certainly did!  Before spray guns and sprayable lacquers, the only way to paint a car body in colors was by brush, using old-fashioned long-drying enamels, coated with a layer or marine varnish! That meant for a very labor-intensive paint job--coupled with the bodies having to be set aside for perhaps several weeks in order for that early enamel paint and varnish to dry hard. 

So, with Ford sales and production passing the 500,000 cars per year mark by the middle of 1913, something had to give. Baking that primitive sort of paint job was out of the question on two counts:  First, the baking process would discolor the paint, and second--and most important:  Car bodies of that era were constructed in WOOD, with merely a sheet-metal skin.  At the worst, baking would cause that wood framing to shrink, making for a very loose body structure (or even causing a fire!); at the least, discoloring the paint itself.

Ford discovered that black enamel, with a bit of "Japan Dryer" (artists who paint in oils know what that is!), could be "Sprayed on" (using little more than a garden hose with nozzle) and then the body shells could be "baked" at a very low temperature by passing them through a "tunnel" of infrared lightbulbs--thus speeding up the production process immeasurably.

So, from about the start of 1914, all the way through 1925, "You could have a new Ford in any color you want, so long as it is black"!

Color choice returned to Ford, and the Model T with the newly restyled 1926 Model T--aided by the then-new ability to spray lacquer paints with the then-new atomizing spray guns that are still used to this day in auto body shops.  Fenders, running boards, and their splash aprons remained in black however, through the 1932 Ford production run.

Art

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