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bare metal foil

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  • Member since
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bare metal foil
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 1:01 PM
does anyone know how to use bare metal foil? I always end up screwing it up
  • Member since
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  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 1:16 PM
hey hurst boy, well the first thing with BMF is to have a new #11 blade in the exacto, and the next step would be to be sure that you burnish it down, say like with a toothpick. then the next step would be to have lots of patients, go slow when you trim and it should come out fine. apply only light pressure when you are trimming it off the model , or it will snag and pull up on you. if you need more info , let us knowThumbs UpThumbs Up

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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 1:29 PM
what do u mean by burnish it, like press it down into the trim or what? sry so confused
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 1:30 PM
thanks by the way man
  • Member since
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  • From: East Bethel, Mn
Posted by midnightprowler on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 4:30 PM
Yep, a sharp knife is key, and burnish means to rub over it. I use a q-tip to rub it in place, the trim excess. Very easy and very realistic.
Lee

1 Corinthians 15:51-54
1 Thessalonians 4:13-18

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  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
Posted by Beemer on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 11:04 PM
I would have to say that this stuff is marvelous. I used to paint my car trim with silver paint. I use this stuff sometimes for masking.
As said before use a tooth pick or my favorite method - a Q-Tip.
Take your time, bare metal foil is a bit fragile.
Ray
A man who limits his interests, limits his life. Vincent Price
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 11:12 PM
hey hurstboy, just let me add one thing. practice , practice , practice, well thats really 3 things, but you get the idea.... grab an old model and foil the crap out of it, over time you will improve your skills with this stuff, i've been using it for about 4 years and will never use the silver paint on trim again, its just to realistic. CoolCool

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  • Member since
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  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Thursday, December 11, 2003 4:51 AM
hurstboy, when you burnish this stuff on, go lightly , but go over everyting well. burnishing just means rubbing over it to get a really good contact on the model, like these guys said use a q-tip, apply the foil, burnish down well, ( even if this means going over the same area 10 or 12 times) and then trim off excess. the weight of the knife is the only pressure you will have to apply to get this stuff to cut..... and go SLOW when you are removing the excess or your knife will go array and you'll be starting over..... but it really is quit easy once you get the 'feel' of hoe to use it.. i hope all of this helps you out, and good luck, let us know how things come out for youSmileSmileSmileThumbs UpThumbs Up

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  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 11, 2003 9:06 AM
ok i just tried it out on an old challenger i messed up on and it took a couple of tries but i have it down ok. The trim is a little rough but it sure does look a whole lot better that silver paint that i was used too. Thanks everyone who helped me with the BMF!
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Thursday, December 11, 2003 3:37 PM
your welcome... just remember to PRACTICE.... in time you'll have it down like a proThumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up

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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 11, 2003 8:57 PM
hey hurstboy, i too just started using foil, however my LHS didn't have BMF, but they did have Detail Masters foil, i suppose it's about the same!!

I LOVE this stuff!!

a little fragile, but the look in great!!

i also use it for oil pans and valve covers!!!
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Thursday, December 11, 2003 10:35 PM
hey ron, if i may add, the BMF, seems to be just a little more thicker or heavier , and it applies much easier than the stuff from detailmaster, you might have to go online to get some , but it is well worth it.

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  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
Posted by kevlar86 on Friday, December 12, 2003 6:39 AM
I was wondering the same thing.. Thanks for the great tips everyone and thanks Hurstboy for posting a good question. Smile
Kevin check out My photoalbum http://photobucket.com/albums/v648/kevlar86/
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 6:16 PM
I have tried both and and personaly I think the detail master foil is better but hey thats just me ...
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Friday, December 12, 2003 6:37 PM
hi moparman, yea the detail master stuff is very good indeed , but i think the BMF is easier for a begginer, or someone just starting out using it. it just seems to go on better? i dont know, maybe the piece i had was old or something? i just could not get it to work right?ConfusedConfused

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  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 11:13 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by FIREMODELMAN

hi moparman, yea the detail master stuff is very good indeed , but i think the BMF is easier for a begginer, or someone just starting out using it. it just seems to go on better? i dont know, maybe the piece i had was old or something? i just could not get it to work right?ConfusedConfused


Yea Know the feeling I have just started using the chrome foil detail master was the first I used then A friend gave me some BMF to try and I guess just because I started out on it is prolly why I like it better but is diff a trick to working with it lol....ConfusedConfusedConfused
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Saturday, December 13, 2003 3:21 AM
yea, it seems thinner or something? i just didnt have any luck with it????ConfusedConfusedConfusedi guess its what we get used toBig SmileBig Smile, cause it is good stuff and i'm in no way putting it down, but i think for the beginner the BMF might be easier to start off with???

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  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 13, 2003 3:27 AM
yea I'll agree it does seem kinda thin but man will it pick up the details ...
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Saturday, December 13, 2003 3:37 AM
oh yea, it sure does.. i've been having problems with my BMF for some reason here of late. when i go to peel it off the sheet , it curls up , man is it hard to get straight again without messing it up??? i havent had this problem until i bought these current sheets i've got???? any cluesSighSigh

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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 13, 2003 8:57 AM
Not sure what to tell ya on that one!!.. I haven't had that problem as of yet but I'm sure in time I will lol...
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 13, 2003 12:54 PM
i glanced at some christmas tags the other day you know the to and from things and relized it reminded me a lot of BMF, I tried it on a older model and it looked good just thought it might be a little easier for begginers
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 13, 2003 12:56 PM
o yea firemodelman i was having that problem with mine but it kinda seemed like the more i messed with it the easier it got i guess i jus got used to it and fixed it my self but im not sure, just try to be really, really careful and take yuor time
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: West of Chicago
Posted by garyo on Saturday, December 13, 2003 2:29 PM
Tried it for the first time today. Really like it. Used it on an old car just around the windshield. Cut it about 1/4 wide and about 1/2 longer than needed. Then as I peeled it back, I stuck it to a small strip of paper. Same on the other end as it came loose. Now I had to "handels" to position it with. That seeme to work well for me.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Monday, December 15, 2003 11:51 PM
hey nice tip garyo, i'll sure try that out the next time i do some foilingThumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up

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  • Member since
    November 2003
Posted by jhaught on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 8:12 AM
Hurstboy and others,

The June '04 issue will have a foiling tutorial/how-to. That might sound a long way off, but if you consider that we're working on the April issue now, it's coming up pretty fast. We're also planning to shoot a foiling cover for that issue.

Jim Haught

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 12:47 PM
sounds great Jim!!!!

Can't wait!!!!!!

I started using the DetailMaster stuff as i mentioned befor, and i like it!!!
However i WILL try BMF to see the difference!!!


Thanks for the great tips everyone!!!
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 7:23 PM
yea i ordered a subscription to scale auto the other day it was kinda an early christmas present so i cant wait till i get mine in the mail
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 11:06 PM
its the best magazine you'll ever ownTongueTonguealways great models and tips. the best part for me is the tips and tech section.enjoyThumbs UpThumbs UpThumbs Up

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  • Member since
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Posted by CraigDaModeler on Thursday, December 18, 2003 12:18 AM
Alrighty then, see if this helps any of you who are new to foil trim.
I use Bare Metal Foil Chrome for nearly all my trimming needs. I say nearly all because I have used gold and Matte Aluminum for specific items before. BMF is an excellent product but I will suggest you stay away from the Ultra Bright Chrome, I find it is too thick and does not cut very well.

On to my tutorial.

Let’s start with some basic tools. You will need fresh #11 blades. I may use as many as 5 or more replacing them often. Put these “used” blades away some where for future “non-foil” use. Some folks use Q-tips but I rather use a soft cloth for initial burnishing. You will also need some round toothpicks for detail burnishing…..LOTS of them. I strongly recommend all foil work to be done under magnification.

This particular model shown, I decided to foil the side trim to protect the delicate contour detail with BMF prior to priming and painting. One key element to getting smooth foil is to be sure the surface you are applying the foil to is free of dust and debris and generally smooth. BMF is thin enough it will take the contour of orange peel and trash in the paint and on the surface. I will rub fairly aggressively along the trim with a damp cloth.

In this photo you can see the over lap of the segment being foiled prior to trimming. Do a full segment at a time, for instance in the photo the entire rear quarter trim beyond the door is the segment being foiled; the door would be another segment.



Place the foil on one end, line it up straight and smooth it down with the soft cloth making several passes. Next, use the round toothpick holding it on an angle such that the point is nearly parallel with the trim. Guide the toothpick down the entire length following every contour. This may need to be done several times but with each successive run you can lift the angle and put more of the point or tip of the toothpick on the foil. Never use only the point. It is kind of a “feel” thing to know at what angle the toothpick will tear the foil, so the idea here is to not reach that point!

After the foil is burnished down, it is time to trim. As stated, start with a fresh #11 blade. Follow the edge of the trim using only the weight of the knife to do the cutting. Make this run only one time! Remove the excess. You will be able to tell if a spot is not cut completely through the foil as it will want to pull and is also quite visible. If this occurs, STOP, burnish everything back into place and start trimming at that spot. Same goes for places where the knife may have slipped onto the trim, burnish it back down and trim in the correct place. Once the excess is removed, you can see if any further places require closer trimming. ALWAYS burnish before and after any cutting is done. Again, I strongly recommend that all of this be done under magnification.



Foiling around vent windows is probably the trickiest places to do. All I can suggest is to look at what is required and do it in complete segments burnishing any overlapping as much as possible.



Now would be a good time to talk about repairs to damaged sections. I have yet to do a model that did not need foil repair at some point. One option is to replace the entire segment but this is not always practical. While I have yet to find a way to completely eliminate the line of the repair will show, it can be done in such a manner that it is less noticeable. First if the spot to repair is from a tear, cut that section out leaving a clean cut edge on either side. Burnish both sides as much as possible. Cut a piece of foil to over lap both ends. You know by now what’s next, burnish…..be as aggressive as you can without damaging. The soft cloth really helps blend the pieces together.
Here are a few tips on making repairs; if practical, cut the bad spot and remove back to the end of the segment, this will leave only one repair line. If the bad spot is on the lower side of a defined trim, replace only the lower part and the repair lines will not be as noticeable. For very small repairs like nicks and such use chrome silver paint or a silver sharpie to touch only that spot.

ZzzOk WAKE UPZzz…one more foil trick for you. I see a lot of models at contests where the builder either does a real sloppy job painting scripts or does nothing at all and leaves them painted body color. Now this technique will not work real well of the molded in scripts are not very well defined but if they are clean crisp and well defined this works quite well.

Before any primer or any paint is applied, lay some BMF over the scripts and……anybody, anybody……burnish. This is one place you will definitely use the point of the toothpick (carefully), inside the lettering in between every line, hoop, arc, ect and all around the outer perimeter as well. Trim the foil as close as possible around the outer perimeter only. After each coat of primer and paint use something in the 4000 grit range to remove the pigment from the foil. Don’t over do it or you will loose the chrome finish or the foil itself.






Craig Naquin 'Nawlins, La "If at first you don’t succeed, keep on suckin’ till you do succeed” Curly Howard
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: TRENTON, OHIO
Posted by FIREMODELMAN on Thursday, December 18, 2003 12:54 AM
BowBowBowBowBowBow, you need to write your own book on modeling tips craig!!!!!, an excellent read, i follow all those tips to a tee, but still have the hardest time doing the scrips on the sides of cars. i just cant seem to get this down????this needs to be a sticky as well, many thanks. its people like you that make this hobby fun for everyoneBowBowBow ( and i didnt even fall asleepWink)

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