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Removing ridge from tires

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  • Member since
    May 2008
Removing ridge from tires
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 7, 2003 3:08 PM
I'm new to modeling and I am building may first race-type car. The racing slicks I got have an unattractive seam running down the middle of them. I would like to know what is the best way to remove the ridge?

greg
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 7, 2003 4:01 PM
Try 240 or 320 grit sand paper. It will not only remove the seam but make the tire look to have been "run".
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by kevlar86 on Sunday, December 7, 2003 6:12 PM
Sign - Ditto Ive seen some of mitchums work and I would definitly go with his suggestion. Smile
Kevin check out My photoalbum http://photobucket.com/albums/v648/kevlar86/
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by dubix88 on Monday, December 8, 2003 4:20 PM
HEY,
I have done the same thing as mitchum, and he is right when he says that is gives it a worn look. Works great.

Randy
"If a woman has to choose between saving an infants life and catching a fly ball, she would choose to save the infant without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry Semper Fidelis
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 8, 2003 6:51 PM
that is the best and easiest way!!!

the only thing i do different is i mount the tire on a scrap rim or round peice of plastic and mount it on my drill, or my dremel, and spin the tire, lightly putting presure on the sand paper......
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 8, 2003 11:22 PM
Thanks for the answers guys, I appreciate it. I've never done any kind of weathering before and I'm looking for a box-stock, non-driven look, just a cleanly built model. I know that's probably pretty boring to most of you "after-market" guys but do you think it'll look alright with sanded tires? Maybe a light coat of paint would help?

greg

BTW: It's a Tamiya Sauber Mercedes C-9, saw Ramon Quintana's Best in Show version in Scale Auto and fell in love with the car. I only wish I was talented enough to weather it the way he did, what an awesome job.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 11:50 AM
Greg,

I never build full detail type cars. In fact, my motto is "if it don't show, it don't go". I glue down the hoods and my "engines consist of only what shows from the underside of the car. I guess I really don't build models at all. What I build are glorified photo "props" like the false front buildings in the western movies. I concentrate on getting "the look" more that super detailing but the tread is one thing I always do. Even if you just "roll out" a car for photos the tires are gonna get the treads dirty. Now don't tell anyone but here is my secret for removing the seams and making the tires look new but "rolled". Take a #! Xacto handle with a #11 blade and scrape the tread. Hold it at about a 90 degree (right) angle to the tire and it will scrape off the seam while dulling the tread area but not rough it up like the sandpaper will. If this is too much weathering then rub your finger across you forehead and then across the tread area. The light coat of body oil will make the tread shine again but with a different gloss than the rest of the tire. Give it a try and let me know what you think.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Twin Cities, MN
Posted by colinm on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 12:44 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by mitchum

Greg,
... Now don't tell anyone but here is my secret for removing the seams and making the tires look new but "rolled". Take a #! Xacto handle with a #11 blade and scrape the tread. Hold it at about a 90 degree (right) angle to the tire and it will scrape off the seam while dulling the tread area but not rough it up like the sandpaper will. If this is too much weathering then rub your finger across you forehead and then across the tread area. The light coat of body oil will make the tread shine again but with a different gloss than the rest of the tire. Give it a try and let me know what you think...

Don't worry mitchum, your secret is safe with us 1200+ members Big Smile.
"So I bought it, brought it home, and built my first tangerine-scented glue bomb" - Patrick Mulligan from 'Starting Line' -- August 2002 issue of Scale Auto.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 2:45 PM
Thanks Mitchum, that worked exactly like you said. The tires look great. Thanks for the help!

greg

  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 4:59 PM
I have found a method that works pretty well if you just want to remove the center ridge. First, I mount the wheel on a drill as described above. Then slowly rotate the drill chuck by hand (NOT under power) with one hand while holding a new single-edge razor blade tangent to the wheel with the other hand. It cuts the ridge off as a tiny curl and leaves the tire flat. Don't increase the tangent angle very much or the blade will bite into the tire.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 6:06 PM
Thanks ChemMan, I'll try that next time. I think a new blade is only good for maybe two tires though, they sure dull fast at such an angle.

greg
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 7:22 PM
I know "Sticker" GoodYears have a center seam that is visible on the tires. I have used a new Xacto number 11 to remove just some of the seam to get a scale appearence for stickers.
I'm not sure if Pirelli, Michelin, or Bridgestones have this ridge.

Mack
  • Member since
    October 2003
Posted by Andy Lilienthal on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 8:46 AM
I'm in the same situation right now. I have a set of really soft drag slicks with a seam right down the middle. Because the slicks aren't solid rubber and they're so big, you can't really chuck the wheel/tire on a drill bit and do the traditional sanding method and get good results. The X-acto idea works well, but it's got to be a brand-new sharp blade. I've also taken some 400-grit to the seam. I put my finger inside the slick and slowly rotate the slick against the paper. It's rather labor intensive, though.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Dayton, OH
Posted by mach12003 on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 9:24 AM
Hey Andy,
I do all of my tires by hand using the "sandpaper and finger in the tire method". I never use a drill..... to me if I slip with the drill I have a sidewall that looks like I drove my car up against the curb (not cool) so I would rather spend the extra time and not risk the mistake........ after all, it's only time and time doesn't cost me anything... LOL

Eric
Eric Cole More Pics Here: http://photobucket.com/albums/y197/justdande/
  • Member since
    October 2003
Posted by Andy Lilienthal on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 9:33 AM
I do most of mine by hand, too. I did take my Dremel tool to a set of NASCAR slicks and that worked well except that if you mistkenly leave the bit in one spot for too long, it looks like you flat-spotted them.
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 6:24 PM
Andy, next time you've got one of those thin wall slicks find a solid tire that will fit inside like a stock car tire to give it support and you might be able to chuck it the regular way after all. You'd be surprised how much one of those tires will stretch. LOL
  • Member since
    May 2008
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, December 10, 2003 10:40 PM
if you 'flat spot' the tire, just use it in a pit stop diorama, as the tire that just came off the car!!!

HAHAHAHA

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