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WIP - 1/12 Tamiya Tyrrell P-34 (six wheeler) Update August 25, 2020

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  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
WIP - 1/12 Tamiya Tyrrell P-34 (six wheeler) Update August 25, 2020
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 4:13 PM

As a hobby, I build  model cars and model airplanes. For that past couple of years I have exclusively built model airplanes, so I need a change. I figure that it would be fun building a somewhat unique model car, so I decided to build a 1/12 scale Tamiya Tyrrell P34.   This is the race car with four front wheels Tongue Tied  

I remember attempting to build this kit in the mid 1970's. At that time I only built 1/25 and 1/24  scale cars, and I was overwhelmed by the detail and parts count of this kit. As I recall, this kit was never finished. So, it's time that I give it another try.

 

The difference in size between a 1/24 scale car and a 1/12 scale car is greater than one would guess. This is a 1/24 scale Corvette and a 1/12 scale Ford GT Mk II. Big difference.

 

The instructions have a copyright date of 2007. HOWEVER, the frets have a much earlier date on them. One is dated 1975. Luckly, there are very minor amounts of flash on the parts.

This kit has over 370 parts including lots and lots of small parts. The arrow is pointing at a 12" long ruler to give you an idea of the size of the frets. In addition to the plastic parts, there is a PE sheet and clear and black tubing, spark plug cables and brake ducts.

The instructioins are typical Tamiya quality.

Prior to starting the build I downloaded about 30 photos of the real car for reference and a review of the kit by Modeler Site. I am a retired architect which unfortunately makes me somewhat anal retentive about detaling.

Let's get started on the engine. I painted the nicely detailed engine in Testors' Aluminum Plate Metalize paint. After the paint dried I sealed it with Testors' Clear Flat. I did not use Testors' Matalizer Sealer because I do not like the way it looks.

This is a comparison between the 1/12 scale engine block and a 1/24 scale engine block. Again, big difference. It's easy to add additionl detail to engines of this scale so I intend to remove all of the molded plastic bolt heads on the engine and transaxle and replace them with stainless steel bolts.

This kit will take a while to complete. Also, I no longer receive email motifications from this forum and the forum at Fine Scale Modeler. 

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: West Bloomfield, MI
Posted by steveracer on Thursday, February 27, 2020 8:22 AM

Awesome!  Welcome back to cars.  And congratulations on the retirement as an architect, you are fit for the job!  I am to be a soon to be "retired" automotive designer, so I have that stupid retentive gene too...  :)  

 

These kits are not that hard, just time consuming.  Depends how much you want to get into it.  And the subject matter is really interesting to learn how the damn thing was designed and constructed, you will love it.  This site has a lot of inspiration to modelers so keep those cards and letters coming.

steelies, dog dishes and poker chips

  • Member since
    January 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:04 AM

Good luck with this build.  I started the same kit 6 mounths ago and have used a large amount of RB Motion and Top Studios bolts and A/N fittings.  This old kit sure lacks the quality of newer Tamiya kits, shows how far the kit companies have come. Keep up with the photos.  BTW what are you using for the Tyrrell blue.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, February 27, 2020 12:35 PM

steveracer

Awesome!  Welcome back to cars.  And congratulations on the retirement as an architect, you are fit for the job!  I am to be a soon to be "retired" automotive designer, so I have that stupid retentive gene too...  :)  

 

OMG!!! I think that being an automotive designer would be the best job ever!! Cars and trucks are real works of art.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, February 27, 2020 12:54 PM

Viperdoug

Good luck with this build.  I started the same kit 6 mounths ago and have used a large amount of RB Motion and Top Studios bolts and A/N fittings.  This old kit sure lacks the quality of newer Tamiya kits, shows how far the kit companies have come. Keep up with the photos.  BTW what are you using for the Tyrrell blue.

 

I used RB Motion bolts and fittings on my 1/12 Lotus that I built a few years ago. They make real nice stuff. I am using Tamyia X-04 Blue for the car's body. That is what the instructions indicate. 

Now, just to let you know how nuts I really am, I am thinking of using Bare Metal Foil as a finish on the unpainted aluminum body panels of the model.Confused

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, February 27, 2020 1:26 PM

Before I continue, I'd like to share this tip with everyone (I learned this from a fellow modeler). I add a piece of masking tape to each fret. Using a magic marker, I mark each fret's letter onto the masking tape. This makes it fast and easy to choose the correct fret.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, February 28, 2020 2:40 PM

The Ford Cosworth engine's oil system was a dry sump system. The system was composed of an oil tank mounted to the firewall and a series of pumps attached to the lower engine block. 

I removed six of the molded plastic bolts on the dry sump cover and replaced them with stanless steel bolts.

The instructions call for finishing the oil tank with a chrome paint. I decided to finishI the oil tank in Bare Metal Foil Chrome instead of painting it.

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, February 29, 2020 1:08 AM

Great project! And very interesting subject. It seems a daunting kit. I'm going to enjoy watching this one come together.

Have you considered aluminum plate buffing metalizer for the unpainted body panels?

 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, February 29, 2020 9:27 AM

Bainford

Great project! And very interesting subject. It seems a daunting kit. I'm going to enjoy watching this one come together.

Have you considered aluminum plate buffing metalizer for the unpainted body panels?

 

I may end up using Testots' Metalizer paint. It is difficult applying Bare Metal Foil to large areas without ending up with wrinkles. However, both Testors Metalizer and Allclad Aluminum paints end up looking like paint, because they are paint. Bare Metal Foil looks like metal because it is metal.

  • Member since
    November 2004
  • From: UK
Posted by PatrickW on Saturday, February 29, 2020 4:10 PM

Very nice kit! I made one of the first large scale Lotus 46 kits out some 30+ years ago!

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, February 29, 2020 7:49 PM

PatrickW

Very nice kit! I made one of the first large scale Lotus 46 kits out some 30+ years ago!

 

It's too bad that Tamiya has ignored the big scale car kits. They have a number of cycles but few cars. They do have an Enzo Ferrari priced at over $600.00. Too rich for me. I would guess that there are some big scale kits on ebay.

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: West Bloomfield, MI
Posted by steveracer on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 6:20 PM

That's it you did it now.  I just went out and bought this kit.

Any updates?  BTW I am trying to complete my 1/12 Williams at this time....

steelies, dog dishes and poker chips

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 10:30 AM

Yes, I have a few updates. I wish that I could find more time to work on this model, but I have been sooooooooooo busy since I retired. It is realy strange, but I am more busy now that when I was working. The nice thing is that I am able to do  things that I like to do instead of working on things that I am told to do. As an example, this week I trimmed a few branches off of my Crabapple tree, I raked up some leaves in the flower garden, I touched up the paint on some door trim, I went to exercise class, I worked on this model, I listened to some music, I took a short drive in my Z3. None of this would have been possibe when I was working. Retirement is just wonderful.

The kit includes clear tubing for the fuel injection system and black wire for the ignition system. I used Gators Grip to glue the clear tubing to the injection distributor rings. I hope that that works.

While the Gator Grip dried, I started working on the front body panel. The thickness of the plastic at the panel joint (red arrow) is less than 1/32" thick and there are only two small alignment pins. I think that Tamiya used some folks from Monogram to design this joint Big Smile

It is important that the body panel aligns with the bottom plate after the body panel joint is glued together. I taped the two sides of the body panel together and then taped the body panel to the bottom plate to insure perfect alighment. Next. I glued the two body panel parts together with a combo of Testors cement and Tamiya extra thin cement.

This is the finished joint, looking at the underside of the body panel. My concern is that this joint is going to flex, or crack, while I sand the filler on the top of the seam. So, I will need to reinforce the joint wth some strips of styrene. 

Now I am off to do something fun. I don't know know what it will be, but I know that it will take all day to do it.Wink

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, March 5, 2020 3:36 PM

For you modelers that love models with a lot of parts, you'll love this model. This is a photo of the parts that make up the transaxel and brakes. These were painted this morning. Not included in this photo are the rear suspension parts. I'll start on assembling this tomorrow. The gray parts were painted with Testors' Metalizer Stainless Steel overcoated with Testors' Flat Clear. The black parts are Testors' Semigloss Black.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, March 19, 2020 11:45 AM

I can't continue on the transaxel until the miniature metal bolts arrive. In the mean time I worked on the rear brakes.

The rear brake rotors are chrome plated and are composed of two parts (left and right side). Also included are PE parts for the rotor faces. First I sanded off all of the chrome plating from the rotors.  Then I painted the edges of the rotors with Testors' rust.

First the sides of the rotors were glued together and the hubs were attached. Then I painted the stub axels and hubs with Testors' Steel. I then gave them a swish with a thin wash of Testors' Rust. Next came a wash with Tamiya Smoke. Last came a coat of Testors' Flat Clear from the bottle. Last, the PE rotor faces were attached. I really like the result. The molded on bolts really pop.

This is an old kit with some molds dating back to the 1970's. The majority of the parts suffer from flash where the two parts of the molds meet. Keep in mind that there are hundreds of parts in this kit and most of them, especially the round parts,  will require sanding to remove the flash. The engine, transaxel and rear suspension alone are composed of about 200 parts and they all require sanding. I should have been prepared for this, but I wasn't. What a drag.

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, March 22, 2020 12:07 PM

I painted the transaxle with Testors' Metalizer Aluminum Plate. After the paint dried I sealed it with Testors' Flat Clear. Next I used Tamyia Smoke to bring out the molded in details.ValleJo  Oil was used to simulate spilled oil at the fill plugs. The color of the edges of the rotors is incorrect in these photos. The true color is rust.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, March 28, 2020 1:50 PM

Three hands are needed to install the fuel lines. One hand to hold the engine block, one hand to hold the fuel injection rack and one hand to thread the fuel lines under the injection rack. The best solution is to clamp the emgine into a small vise.

The injection ram tube that are included in the kit are chrome plated. The tubes on the 1:1 car were spun aluminum. In an effort to mimic the look of aluminum I first rubbed the chrome plated tubes with fine steel wool (top photo left). Next I painted the tubes with Tamyia SMoke. Next I painted the tubes withy Taestos' Cleat Flat (bottom photo left).

 

I painted the inside of the tubes with Testors' Clear Flat (left image).

The 1:1 engine used black bands to keep the fuel lines and ignition wiring organized. I cut thin pieces from a mouse cable's insulation to duplicate the look. I used a silver magic marker to highlight the valve cover bolts.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Tuesday, March 31, 2020 1:56 PM

The tranmission did not fit properly to the engine, so some prodding with a big clamp was necessary. 

This photo gives you an idea as to the size of the 1/12 scale engine/transaxel.

Next up is the exhaust system. There is nothing to hold the headers in place while the glue sets. I predict that there will be a lot of cursing involved.

First issue. The plastic exhaust pipe that is included in the kit is warped, plus it is not a true circle in cross section. I decided to scrap the plastic exhaust pipe and substitute an aluminum tube instead. I flared one end by spinning the tube while I pressed it against a pair of needle nosed pliers. The small tube will be epoxed inside the larger tube. The small tube will be glued into the plastic collector.

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: West Bloomfield, MI
Posted by steveracer on Thursday, April 2, 2020 9:46 AM

The engine and gearbox assembly look awesome!  Keep up the posts, some of us are watching...  :)  

If I may make a suggestion, a little wash on the cam covers and black on the plug wire grommets may give some definition to the top of the engine.  Most DFV's I have seen have darker cast cam covers, so a wash may help a bit, no?

 

Email subscription or not!

steelies, dog dishes and poker chips

  • Member since
    January 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Thursday, April 9, 2020 1:22 PM

How are you doing on your kit? I started mine last summer and now that I have been out work for 3 weeks I have been working hard on mine. Boy its a slow build, the amount of flash and mold fit issues and injector pin marks sure have slowed this build down. I didn't build this kit when it first came out so I don't know if these problems were there before or if its the age of the molds.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, April 9, 2020 4:39 PM

Steve and Viper, thanks for posting. I didn't think that anyone was watching.

I'll give the valve covers a light black wash. Good suggestion. I'll post some new photos tomorrow. I've run into a couple of nasty "gotcha's". I'll post those tomorrow also.

I've been spending a lot of time working in the garden doing Spring cleanup.  Usually I only work on this model when the weather outside is nasty. 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, April 10, 2020 1:54 PM

The hood is finished. It was painted with Tamiya rattle can blue.

There is a lot of flash on the rear suspension arms that need to be sanded off.

Note parts G24 and G25 (blue arrows). These need to be installed at a specific angle. The angle is indicated on the drawing (red arrow). It is very easy to not notice that drawing. It will be impossible to install the suspension control rods if those parts are installed on the wrong angle.

These are the rear suspension springs/shocks. The springs must be installed over assembled parts E38/E37 (red arrow) before part K4 (blue arrow) is inserted. However, once E38/E37 are glued together it is impossible to insert K4. HUH!!! I glued E38/E37 together with Testors red label glue because it a slow setting glue. After about 30 minutes, I installed the springs and pushed K4 into E38/E37. The slow setting allowed E38/E37 to temporarly spread apart. I then pushed two very small screwdrivers between the spring coils to push E38/E37 back together. WHAT!!! Time for a drimk.

 

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Friday, April 10, 2020 2:45 PM

You are making great progress. I continue to be blown away by the number of parts. Very fine detail. Everything is looking great!

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Friday, April 10, 2020 3:02 PM

Bainford

You are making great progress. I continue to be blown away by the number of parts. Very fine detail. Everything is looking great!

 

I'm slowly getting there! Lots of flash and gotcha's.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Saturday, April 11, 2020 4:47 PM

PE grills are included in the kit. They are applied to the faces of the radiators and oil coolers. The above pictures are of the front and back of one of the radiators. The radiators on the left include the PE grills.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 2:51 PM

Now it's on to the steering rack. This is designed so that when the steering wheel is turned the front wheels also turn. This thing is one major pain to put together. If it is not done correctly the rack will bind.

It is important to study the instructions for this kit carefully. It is not obvious at first glance, but there is a long side and a short side to the steering rack. The short side needs to face right. Also, it is important that the rack teeth are centered on the pinion grear when it is installed. I marked the center of the rack teeth with a silver marker. One more thing, see that little nub on the top of the shaft of the pinion gear--it must be facing "up" when the rack and pinion are installed. I painted the nub with a silver marker so I don't make a mistake. Wait, there is more. The teeth on the rack are too long and they cause the rack to bind. I sanded just a little off of the teeth. And there is more. All bumps and mold flash must be sanded off of the rack or else it will bind. And, the round part of the pinion gear must be smooth of any flash and fret bumps, or else the rack will bind.

Now that that is done, let's move onto something that will really drive you nuts---the exhaust system.

I painted the headers and the collector Testors Black and Testors Metalizer Titanium. I then sealed the Titanium with Testors Dull Coat. I may have mentioned this earlier--I replaced the kit's exhaust pipe with an aluminum tube which was painted to match the headers.

The headers fit into a socket that is molded into the engine block. However, the fit is super loose. That means that the headers will flop around before the glue sets. The holes in the collector are way to large. there is no way to friction fit the tips of the heqaders into the collector. They just flop around. I solved this by filling the holes in the collectors with Bondo. After the Bondo cured, I drilled the proper sized holes into the Bondo to ensure a tight friction fit with the headers.

The headers dryfit very snug into the collectors (top photo). I glued the headers into the engine block sockets. After the glue cured, I pulled off the collector, removed the Bondo, and then glued the collector to the headers with a gel super glue.

One set of headers are finished. Now it's time to have a nice tall cocktail and do the other side.

I can't wait to see what other kind of snigs, snags, and other crazy stuff this kit has in store for me Sigh

 

  • Member since
    January 2018
Posted by Viperdoug on Saturday, April 18, 2020 1:30 PM

You might want to think about ordering up decals from Indycal, I started to decal my model a couple nights ago and the Tamiya decals split into several parts.  Lucky I had a set of Indycals I had ordered earlier. Good luck and your right the headers are a pain!

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Nova Scotia
Posted by Bainford on Saturday, April 18, 2020 10:00 PM

Very interesting build. I'm enjoying watching this one come together. Everything is looking clean. 

"It would be unusual, if the unusual didn't occur."

- Steamboat Gariepy

Trevor

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Wednesday, April 22, 2020 5:51 PM

The headers and exhaust pipes on both sides are finished. One side is a little longer than the otherside. But, that's okay.

Next, i'll assemble the front suspension. The above photo shows the parts required for one side of the front suspension. 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, April 27, 2020 3:16 PM

The top photo is the front suspension of the 1:1 car. Tamiya did a very good job of duplicating the 1:1 car (bottom photo). I painted the bulkhead Testors' Metalizer Aluminum Plate. Unfortunetly, Testors no longer makes this paint. I used 26 guage wire to make the disc pad clips and I used the wire from a mouse cable to make the brake hose. 

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